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Brain

NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Alzheimer's disease expert at Drexel University is testing an unusual approach to the disease: giving the brain what may be a more efficient source of energy. In people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, the brain loses its ability to properly metabolize glucose early in the course of disease, said Carol Lippa. This is critical because the brain needs a lot of fuel. "The brain uses, like, 30 percent of your oxygen," she said. "Your brain is really active metabolically, so it needs a really good supply of energy.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY CAROL KLEINER
  I AM A baseball fan. I love all aspects of the game: the fact that it's your companion for the entire summer and hopefully well into the fall, the idea that every at-bat creates its own set of circumstances that can turn the tide of a game in a heartbeat, the fact that not every season can be a repeat of the Phillies' magical 2008 season, but that every season can be enjoyed for the ride it gives you. I cherish baseball. I have delighted in the opportunity to spend special time with my son every summer for the past 16 years as we travel to a new ballpark, just the two of us. We have journeyed to 14 different parks, and Cooperstown, N.Y. This year we're trekking to Atlanta.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MARY Anderson doesn't know where her son is. She knows that his skin and bones were buried at Northwood Cemetery. But Vance Anderson's brain, eyes and other internal organs never made it to his West Oak Lane grave site. The 51-year-old painter, who died in 2012 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from a lung condition, was allegedly a hollowed-out shell by the time he was lowered into the ground - stripped for parts like a junkyard Chevy. Vance Anderson's insides were, in the words of a Jefferson doctor, "donated for education.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Medical education is in a crisis. According to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, half of 4,287 students surveyed at seven medical schools experienced burnout and 10 percent expressed suicidal ideation. And doctors aren't much better off; a second study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 7,288 physicians showed that almost half had experienced some symptom of burnout. The public image of doctors hasn't fared well, either. While the popular notion of doctors was once the wise and avuncular Marcus Welby, M.D., more recent portrayals tend toward Dr. Gregory House, a brilliant but annoying know-it-all with a decided God complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Come Saturday, Philadelphia's beloved Franklin Institute will more resemble a fairground than a museum - albeit one with a scientific slant. At the grand opening of the Nicholas and Athena Karabots Pavilion, the institute's 53,000-square foot, $41 million addition, sounds of celebration will fill the museum's halls. The pavilion houses the interactive, neuroscience-focused "Your Brain" exhibit - a permanent installation that opens Saturday - in addition to conference and education centers and exhibition spaces for traveling shows such as "Circus!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there On a summer afternoon in 2009 at an Ocean City Shore house, Bob's friend made an announcement about that evening's Atlantic City festivities: Several Eagles cheerleaders would be joining them. "It was like, 'Oh my God! Wow! This is great!' " remembered Bob, who grew up in Voorhees. He and the other dudes put down their beverages to prepare. "There were guys doing push-ups everywhere. " As soon as Jenna walked in, Bob whispered to his friend. "You really need to hook me up here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE FRANKLIN Institute has expanded its commitment to science education and made space for world-class traveling exhibits in the process, thanks to the new three-story Karabots Pavilion, opening Saturday. The addition will kick off with a "brain party" to celebrate its main attraction, "Your Brain," a permanent exhibit on the pavilion's second floor. But while all the sensation runs through the brain, it's only part of the opening day itinerary. The first 500 visitors can experience the Institute's new furnishings and a rare gallery of 80 scientific artifacts for free, while the rest must pay normal admission prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THE BRAIN. It's how we perceive and create our world. It's our motivator and best protector - and sometimes our undoing. All this and more are explored in the super-spiffy interactive exhibit opening Saturday at the Franklin Institute - a $10 million installation celebrating "Your Brain. " It's the big come-on of the Institute's new, 53,000-square-foot addition: the Nicholas and Athena Karabots Pavilion. An entertaining hands-on, eyes-on, full-body experience demonstrating how our noggins' work, "Your Brain" - and the three-story museum addition that houses it - culminates seven years of planning and a whole lot of fundraising by the museum, explained incoming president/CEO Larry Dubinski.
SPORTS
June 9, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Walk in looking the wrong way and you might miss the real star of the Franklin Institute's major new exhibition, preserved and suspended, unfurled for pondering both prosaic and poetic: a real human brain and its ruffled tail of a spinal column. Of all the major organs, this may be the most inscrutable. Form follows function in the case of the heart and stomach, but tracing this familiar intertwined clutch of tubes and two knotted bulges at the back, underneath, reveals nothing about what it actually does.
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