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NEWS
February 21, 2014
A PAIR OF upcoming local beer-drinking events has me thinking out of both sides of my brain. My left side - controlled and analytical - is focused on Saturday's Bierfest at the German Society of Pennsylvania. I'll sit on a panel of beer experts to discuss classic, old-world lager styles. My right side - freewheeling and emotional - is preparing for Beer School at the Loft at Iron Abbey, in Horsham, next week. I'll lead an advanced class on unconventional beer ingredients that produce inventive, newfangled flavors.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University will try to entice New Jersey's best and brightest to stay in-state with a new undergraduate merit scholarship that president Robert L. Barchi announced Monday. The Henry Rutgers Merit Scholarship will be awarded to 100 undergraduates a year for each of the next four years in an attempt to reduce the flow of more than 30,000 students who leave the Garden State annually for college elsewhere. The scholarships will be available to freshmen entering in the fall of 2014.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
PIZZA AND BEER have always been one of life's most sacred combinations. But there's no chapter in the good book of pie-and-pint relations that quite addresses what Pizza Brain and Tired Hands Brewing Company have in mind. In January, Kensington's zany pizza-culture emporium introduced a monthly "Third Thursdees" collaboration event that has the parlor pairing with local businesses to create . . . something. The taco truck Calle del Sabor visited last month, providing jerk chicken for specialty slices.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
What a headache! Coworkers at the nail salon were worried about Xi. She had been a remarkably reliable worker for the last 20 years. Always on time, she seemed to enjoy her work. Meticulous and skillful, she trimmed cuticles, filed nails and applied polish to her clients' fingers and toes, taking pride in perfection. Over the last month, however, Xi had started to show up late, sometimes with bedraggled hair and rumpled clothes. Her work was deteriorating, too. Regular customers were concerned, asking if she was ill or suffering.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER A Chester County Court jury has awarded $32.8 million to a 4-year-old girl, concluding that she suffered brain damage at birth because nurses at Phoenixville Hospital failed to alert doctors about changes in her condition. After a two-week trial, the jury on Friday found two nurses were negligent when they waited 13 minutes to tell doctors that Lilly Ciechoski's heart rate had dropped, the family's lawyer said. The same jury found that a third nurse and the hospital were not to blame for the girl's injuries.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Goldstein has always been freaked out by needles and blood. When he was about five, his mother, physician Susan Wiegers, had a small biopsy done. Goldstein and his brother asked to see the wound. "It was a tiny line with two stitches," she recalled. Goldstein's brother was fascinated. But Goldstein turned away. "I don't feel so good," he said. Then he keeled over. Since then, Goldstein has passed out, or come close to it, every time he has had a close encounter with a syringe or an intravenous line.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Memory loss, cognitive deficits, drops in IQ, and abnormal brain structures: these are but a few of the neurotoxic effects that recent research has correlated to marijuana use in adolescents. But while a number of studies suggest a link between these changes and regular cannabis use, particularly for young teens, there is no definitive evidence that marijuana is entirely to blame. Adolescents who smoke daily, for example, may have problems that predate marijuana use. One thing is certain: pot smoking among American teenagers is on the rise.
SPORTS
January 4, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Even after Nick Foles threw 27 touchdown passes and two interceptions this season, even after he compiled the highest passer rating in the NFL, even after he led the Eagles to their first division title in three years to set up Saturday's wild-card matchup against the New Orleans Saints, there remains an air of mystery about him. This is understandable. It's not often that a quarterback selected in the third round of the NFL draft, as Foles was by the Eagles in 2012, flourishes as he has. It's even rarer that a quarterback with so humble a pedigree (by the standards of most elite NFL quarterbacks)
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
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