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Brain

NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In the 1990s, an Israeli biophysicist wondered whether cells that were in the process of dividing might be vulnerable to damage by electromagnetic energy. If so, then maybe electric fields could be used to disrupt the growth of cells that divide relentlessly and uncontrollably - otherwise known as cancer. Yoram Palti began testing his hypothesis in the lab of his fledgling company, Novocure, located in his basement. The therapy he called "tumor-treating fields" met with deep skepticism, and some experts still have doubts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Staff Writer
"Consussion" seems like a strange Christmas release: Hey, lets go see that movie where pro football players with brain damage kill themselves. And in truth, it's not a knee-slappin' good time at the theater. But it is more appropriate to the season than you might guess - the story of a deeply religious man who undertakes a moral crusade, motivated by an abiding faith that gives him the courage to take on the NFL, based on his conviction that "God does not want us to play football.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
The young red panda that died unexpectedly at the Elmwood Park Zoo last month had a brain disease likely caused by a parasite. A brain biopsy determined that Clinger, who was just a year and a half old, died of meningoencephalitis, the zoo said Friday. The disease causes inflammation of the brain and Clinger, who died Nov. 29, was likely infected by a parasite. His mother also died of encephalitis that was brought on by a parasite. Clinger and his brothers all received preventative treatment, but the zoo said the disease is hard to detect without a brain biopsy.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia going full throttle, the region's year in classical music was bound to be excellent. And it was, with particularly distinguished activity in the outlying areas involving specialists in music both ancient and modern from Chestnut Hill to Princeton. That doesn't mean everything worked out. But while lapses and misfires aren't as satisfying as successes, they can be just as interesting. Pope Francis' visit, for example . . . Most distracted concert.
SPORTS
November 25, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
FORMER PHILLIE Lenny Dykstra is filing another lawsuit. This time, according to TMZ, he's claiming suffered brain damage when he was allegedly beaten by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies while serving time for grand theft auto. Lenny's asking for a cool $15 million. Dykstra claims that in April 2012, six sheriff's deputies slammed his head against the wall and broke several of his teeth. A sheriff's spokesman is on record as saying officers had to restrain Dykstra after he became aggressive.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE INTERRUPT my usual "You gotta do better, people!" rant with a column full of gratitude. I know . . . let's embrace the fleeting moment. It was kind of a nutty idea, I admit. But after hearing Jennifer Pownall's story, I couldn't resist. The Northeast Philly mom was diagnosed with three meningioma brain tumors last year. Sometimes, she told me, music was the only thing that got her through the pain. So, she created the Rock Out Brain Tumors Air Guitar Challenge to raise money for the National Brain Tumor Society by asking people to make videos of themselves rocking out for a good cause.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, For The Inquirer
Jackie Lithgow got out of his wheelchair at the starting line and began walking. He didn't think about the steps he was taking last weekend at the Flyers Charities 5K race. He just walked, and looked like anybody else walking, flanked by his parents and sister and grandmother and other family and friends, and that was the beauty of it. After a first few steps, the 20-year-old stopped to do a little dance move - what his parents might call the twist - right there in the middle of Pattison Avenue because he was happy and because he could.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virtua, South Jersey's biggest health system, has entered into a partnership with Penn Medicine for cancer and neurosciences, the two tax-exempt systems announced Tuesday. Penn's Abramson Cancer Center will replace Fox Chase Cancer Center, and in a neurosciences collaboration, Penn doctors will operate at Virtua Memorial Hospital, in Mount Holly. Virtua has been sending certain stroke patients to Capital Health in Hopewell Township, N.J. Penn, the region's biggest health system, with about $5.3 billion in revenue, has many ties to community hospitals, but "this is a deeper relationship," said Ralph W. Muller, chief executive of the University of Pennsylvania Health System after the announcement at Virtua's Voorhees hospital.
SPORTS
October 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Sanchirico has simple aspirations at this stage of his life: take classes at Rutgers Camden, spend time with family and friends, improve his game as a member of the Scarlet Raptors golf team. "Just be a normal college student," Sanchirico said, setting the bar at a level that always seemed unattainable in recent years. In one way, the 20-year-old from Haddon Township has made good on his goal. His days are pretty pedestrian for a popular pre-business major who can be found many afternoons at the Camden County Golf Academy driving range on Cooper River in Pennsauken.
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