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NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie vowed to rein in government spending when he took office in 2010, and one of his most controversial first-term initiatives was setting a cap on salaries for school district superintendents. Anecdotes of seemingly exorbitant pay for school administrators became a symbol of the government excess Christie had pledged to rid from Trenton. Four years after Christie set his own salary - $175,000 - as a maximum base for superintendents, Democratic lawmakers and school boards say the regulation has resulted in high turnover and made the state less competitive in attracting the best administrators.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Dr. Jeffrey Miller, For The Inquirer
By the time A.A. arrived in my office, she had spent almost a year looking for answers. In November 2012, she was 45 and struggling to lose weight and keep her blood pressure down. What sounds like a common scenario, however, was anything but. A.A. was experiencing fatigue and malaise, and the area around her eyes bruised easily. Another puzzling symptom: She said she was acutely aware of her neck. It wasn't pain, but awareness. She was losing more hair than usual in her brush and had stopped menstruating, and her skin broke open easily.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having trouble remembering all the elements of the proper golf swing? Getting stuck while trying to pick out that tune on the piano? Maybe you're thinking too much. That is the implication of a new study published Monday by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California Santa Barbara, and Johns Hopkins University. On four occasions over a six-week period, the scientists used MRI machines to measure the brain activity of people as they tapped out various 10-digit sequences on a keyboard.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THERESA "TERRI" Robinson ignored the pitfalls of working full time as a health-care manager while attending Lincoln University full time to earn a master's degree in human services. She smoked. She ate salty, fatty foods. She was in her 50s but didn't think about her family's high-risk medical history. Until one night in late March 2012, when she suffered a brain aneurysm. "Finding my mother lying on the floor was one of the most devastating moments of my life," said Robinson's son, Michael, 26, who called 9-1-1 in time to save her. Robinson, 58, who lives in Germantown, said she should have seen the warning signs long before she lost her 25-year health-care career and nearly lost her life.
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, For the Daily News
AVERY MARZ is stepping up and then off of an aerobic platform. Her left foot lands on the platform first and her right foot follows. She does this repeatedly as her physical therapist watches. Her mother, Mary Beth Schoellkopf, stands off to the side and watches intently. Marz, a Saint Joseph's freshman, is wearing a T-shirt from the basketball camp of women's coach Cindy Griffin, a pair of Jordan-brand basketball shorts, athletic shoes and a white headband to keep the sweat from trickling down on her face.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IF "AMERICAN SNIPER" can fire a shot in the culture war, why not "Frozen"? "Frozen"? Yesterday morning, Steve Doocy , of "Fox and Friends," led off a segment on the megapopular animated movie with the basic premise that its intention was to emasculate men. (Actually, its intention was to sell a bazillion CDs, DVDs, costumes, coloring books, etc., but why let the free market interfere with Fox News silliness? Although it is true that male testicles get very small when they're frozen.)
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Every Sunday night after she steps out of her shower, 16-year-old Emma texts a nude selfie to her boyfriend. He has promised to destroy it within five minutes. Michael, 18, knows about the dangers of drinking and driving, but figures a couple of beers won't put him over the edge. After an evening of partying with friends, he tucks himself behind the wheel of the 1989 Honda Civic he borrowed from his brother. The police pick him up 30 minutes later for erratic driving. Alice, 14, who goes to a school for the academically talented, texts until 4 in the morning instead of studying for tomorrow's midterm science exam.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CLINICAL neuropsychologist testified yesterday that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown has mild brain damage consistent with early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Barbara Malamut's testimony contradicted that of three court-appointed mental-health experts who took the stand earlier in the week during a competency hearing to determine whether Brown, 77, is fit to stand retrial for allegedly defrauding four schools of $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to conceal the crimes.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years of "chair shots," "flying head butts," "facebreakers," and "cobra clutch slams" have left former professional wrestlers with long-term brain injuries to which the sport's dominant circuit has continuously turned a blind eye, two ex-wrestlers allege in a proposed class-action suit filed in Philadelphia. The plaintiffs in the suit filed late last week - who include a cross-dressing Italian who wrestled under the name Skull von Krush - say Stamford, Conn.-based World Wrestling Entertainment encouraged them to take risks it knew could permanently affect their well-being while offering them no health or disability insurance.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The darkened room at Drexel University contains a 120-inch projection screen, a bunch of high-end 3-D glasses, and a custom-built computer with enough memory to make your laptop seem like a toaster oven. State-of-the-art equipment, in other words, for racing through a fantasy world to gun down virtual foes. Andrew R. Cohen and Eric Wait use it for something they find much more interesting: traveling through the brain of a mouse. The Drexel engineers and their colleagues have applied video-game technology to let biologists analyze and watch movies of the formation of brain cells - though the phrase "watch movies" hardly does it justice.
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