CollectionsBrain
IN THE NEWS

Brain

SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darren Daulton was awake, speaking with family and in good spirits after a seven-hour surgery Monday at Jefferson University Hospital to remove two tumors from his brain, his surgeon said. Kevin D. Judy reported that the procedure "went well. " Judy, a professor of neurological surgery at Jefferson, said he hopes to have Daulton home for the Fourth of July. The former Phillies catcher and Philadelphia radio personality will need to rest for three to four weeks before likely undergoing radiation treatment, Judy said.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
LOS ANGELES - Long before he was running the operation from the top floor, Ruben Amaro Jr. was a kid in his late-20s just trying to etch out a place on a big-league roster. In June of 1993, Amaro walked into a veteran-packed home clubhouse at Veterans Stadium and reported for work. The surprising Phillies were already running away with the National League East and there was no way the kid from Penn Charter High was going to screw up or get in anyone's way. So Amaro made sure he stayed in the good graces of the unofficial team captain and clubhouse leader, Darren Daulton.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is news no family wants to hear once and now, for the third time in a decade, the Phillies family is dealing with it again. Darren Daulton has two brain tumors. The news about the unquestioned leader of the 1993 Phillies National League championship team first broke Thursday afternoon in a statement released by 97.5 The Fanatic, the radio station that carries Daulton's weeknight program "Talking Baseball with Dutch. " The statement said that Daulton is scheduled for surgery early next week.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Martha Davis and Kristin B. Schubert Once scientists learned that smoking changes the brain, making it very difficult to quit, we were able to devise treatments to help smokers change their behavior. Today we are witnessing another health revolution that is just as far-reaching. It concerns the effects of mistreatment on the brains of young children. It will force us to rethink the way we deliver services - health care, education, and more - to our most vulnerable. And it has particular urgency in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
May 17, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
CHIP KELLY, meet Sam Hinkie. Sam, Chip. The Eagles' new coach and the Sixers' new president of basketball operations share neither a sport nor a background - but they are united in a way they probably don't even realize. They are united in their ability to make people uneasy. Kelly insists that he is a football man to the core, but his philosophies about how to play the game - and, even, how to practice the game - have left some people with a permanent eye-roll. Hinkie, by all accounts, is a video fanatic who spends a large percentage of his time scouting the game in a traditional way - but his embrace of advanced basketball statistics leads some to marginalize him as a nerd.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The contestants sat clustered in teams, viewing the game board projected on the classroom wall and waiting to pounce on a buzzer if they knew the answer. This was clearly no match for amateurs. "What is the average volume of the adult cranial vault, plus or minus 200 ml?" asked Bernie Lopez, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's own Alex Trebek. The Pen Is Mightier - an all-male team of first-year emergency medicine residents, who took their name from a Saturday Night Live skit - was the first to buzz in. It had 10 seconds to answer.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
WILMINGTON - The autopsy of a Texas man who killed his former daughter-in-law and another woman at a Delaware courthouse shows he had a brain tumor. The autopsy report of Thomas Matusiewicz, 68, says a large tumor known as a meningioma was found. Authorities say Matusiewicz killed himself after the courthouse shooting Feb. 11. His widow, Lenore, had sought an independent autopsy, saying she believed an untreated brain tumor was to blame for her husband's violent actions. Matusiewicz was cremated shortly after the state released his body.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
WILMINGTON - The autopsy report for a Texas man who killed his former daughter-in-law and another woman at a Delaware courthouse shows he had a brain tumor. The report notes a large tumor known as a meningioma was found during the autopsy. Authorities say Thomas Matusiewicz, 68, killed himself after the courthouse shooting Feb. 11. The gunman's widow, Lenore Matusiewicz, had sought an independent autopsy saying she believed an untreated brain tumor was to blame for her husband's violent actions.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JEFFREY DEITCH majored in psychology, but eventually became more fascinated by what goes on inside the brain than its emotional reactions. He was intrigued by the "miracle of this extraordinarily well-oiled machine - our brains," said his son, Caleb Deitch. This fascination led him to the main thrust of his scientific work, the study of the crippling disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, and the search for a cause and cure. "He found his life's professional path and passion," his son said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|