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NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Dr. Charitha Gowda, For The Inquirer
'Mom, how long has this been going on?" the woman asked as she helped her 75-year-old mother back into bed. The woman had never seen her mother so unsteady on her feet. She walked as if drunk. "My left side feels so weak. I even have a hard time feeling my leg on that side," the mother said. "It started last night. " The daughter was alarmed on hearing her mother's slurred speech and learning how long the symptoms had been present. Worried that her mother might have suffered a stroke, she called 911. The responding EMTs shared her concern and rushed the elderly woman to the hospital.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
QR Pharma is a five-year-old start-up company based in Berwyn, but the young firm has been able to connect with well-known people and groups as it seeks funding to make drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In 2012, QR Pharma got $468,000 from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research to explore a compound called Posiphen as a potential treatment for Parkinson's. This grant is for work that will be led by Robert Nussbaum of the University of California, San Francisco, and Jack T. Rogers, an associate professor of psychiatry at the genetics and aging research unit of Massachusetts General Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* FRONTLINE. LEAGUE OF DENIAL: THE NFL'S CONCUSSION CRISIS. 9 tonight, WHYY12.   HALL OF FAMER Harry Carson has a 3-year-old grandson who won't be playing football if Carson has anything to say about it. "I've told his mom, my daughter, that he's not going to play football. And his father has bought in," the retired New York Giants linebacker told reporters this summer during a news conference in Beverly Hills, Calif., for PBS' "Frontline" investigation "League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis.
SPORTS
October 7, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Getting injured is a tricky thing. I'm a month into running again after being forced to take three months off. I thought recovery would be easier when I was allowed to hit the road again. Not quite. "It's very rare, in my experience, that physical rehab and emotional rehab progress at the same pace," said Joel Fish, sports psychologist and director of the Center for Sports Psychology in Philadelphia. And that's true. After a month off my feet - after the novelty of riding a stationary bike and having more free time wore off - I was ready to get back out there.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013
CAN YOU believe it? Summer is gone and another school year is upon us! While many of us parents are scrambling to lock down new wardrobes, bus schedules and school supplies for our kids, there's one more thing we need to put on the table, literally: breakfast. Breakfast not only helps kids (and adults) maintain a healthy weight, it also gives schoolchildren a cognitive boost, increasing concentration, memory, test scores and even attendance. Countless studies have proved the importance of eating breakfast.
SPORTS
August 31, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once a hard-driving fullback for the Eagles, Kevin Turner no longer has the hand strength to grasp a straw. That helps explain why Turner considered Thursday's news of a settlement between the National Football League and former NFL players suing the league to be as big a victory as any he had experienced on the field. Turner, 44, found out he shouldn't have to prove that his many symptoms from his diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, came from his eight seasons in the NFL. A lead plaintiff in the class-action settlement reached between 4,500 former players and the NFL, Turner should receive some of the $765 million the league will pay to settle lawsuits.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NFL had considerable legal defenses in its fight with retired players over injuries caused by the violent collisions that are at the heart of the sport, not the least of those being a contract with the players that substantially restricts lawsuits. But in the face of public opinion, and the potential damage to its image, those defenses likely became much less important to the league. The prospect of slugging it out with the players in a multiyear litigation battle in which damaging information is disclosed and the public is regularly reminded of the sport's sometimes brutal impact on player health likely was a powerful incentive for the league to settle.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen-year-old Imani Gordon thinks a good memory will help her be a better veterinarian someday. So the West Philadelphia student was intrigued when she saw a poster on the train for a Temple University memory study. She had already signed up for Lumosity, an online brain-training program. The study might help too, she thought. Plus, it paid $120. "I just want to improve my memory," she said after finishing preliminary testing at psychologist Jason Chein's neurocognition laboratory last month.
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