CollectionsBrain
IN THE NEWS

Brain

NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Nedra Pickler and Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Tuesday proposed an effort to map the brain's activity in unprecedented detail, as a step toward finding better ways to treat such conditions as Alzheimer's, autism, stroke, and traumatic brain injuries. He asked Congress to spend $100 million next year to start a project to explore details of the brain, which contains 100 billion cells and trillions of connections. That's a small investment for the federal government - less than a fifth of what NASA spends every year just to study the sun - but it's too early to see how Congress will react.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
SPORTS
March 24, 2013 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
A Shawnee girls' lacrosse varsity jersey is something to strive for, something players dream about wearing when they start, usually around third grade, in Shawnee's feeder system. But this season, game jerseys won't mean nearly as much as the team's neon shoelaces or its white warm-up shirts - the T-shirts with the gray No. 22 on the back and, on the front, a cry of support for the team's "hero," Katie. Shawnee senior defender and team captain Katie Kernan has brain cancer, and she has been fighting the disease since receiving the diagnosis in late January.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
JUST AS the caveman comedy "The Croods" hits theaters, there is breaking Neanderthal news. This just in: Scientists at the Natural History Museum now believe that our cousin the Neanderthal, whose brain was as big as ours, died out because too much of his brain was dedicated to vision and physical ability, and not enough to socialization and thinking. Thus, he was unable to "cope with environmental change and competition. " This is, rather shockingly, the precise story line of the new 3-D animated comedy "The Croods," though with an upbeat spin.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Scene One: January 1990: Troy Carter, 17, was so obsessed with music and the record business that he dropped out of West Philadelphia High School. Every day he walked to Delaware Avenue, to the studio of hip-hop icons DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince. He went with his rap group, 2 Too Many, a name they chose because there were three of them, but always only bus fare for one, or food money for one, or whatever they needed or wanted, only enough for one. They hoped to find a way inside, a chance to perform.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia researchers have detected part of the virus that causes cervical cancer in a surprising place: a congenital brain malformation that causes an intractable form of epilepsy in children. This is the first study to uncover evidence of the microbe - human papillomavirus (HPV) - in the brain. It is also the first to suggest that an infection in the fetal brain leads to the malformation, which has no known genetic or environmental cause. Peter Crino, a neurologist in the Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center at Temple University, conducted the study with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOMENIC GRECO refused to let a crippling neurological disease that was eating away at his body and wracking him with terrible pain stop him from working. By the end, he was able to communicate only by blinking his eyes, the only movement that Lou Gehrig's disease had left him. When he lost his eyesight, he knew it was time to call it quits. He died Thursday at age 60. He lived in Fort Washington. The reason Domenic fought so hard was that he had work to do. His professional life had been devoted to helping people with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Seven years after a massive stroke removed him from office and left him in a vegetative state, former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is able to process information and has exhibited "robust activity" in his brain, according to doctors who conducted recent tests. Though some hoped Sharon might regain consciousness and resume his life, experts warned that was highly unlikely. The medical team that tested him last week said Monday that the scans showed Sharon, 84, responding to pictures of his family and recordings of his son's voice.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
AS WE WATCH this year's NFL playoffs unfold, we wonder who among the star players will win a Super Bowl, who will enter the Hall of Fame . . . and who among them will commit suicide before age 50. A grisly question, but a fair one. Last week, the National Institutes of Health revealed that one of the NFL's all-time greats, Hall of Fame linebacker Junior Seau, suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy - CTE - the degenerative, sometimes-fatal brain...
SPORTS
January 12, 2013 | By Barry Wilner, Associated Press
Junior Seau, one of the NFL's best and fiercest players for two decades, suffered from a degenerative brain disease often associated with repeated blows to the head when he committed suicide last May, the National Institutes of Health said in a study released Thursday. The NIH, based in Bethesda, Md., said Seau's brain revealed abnormalities consistent with chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE. It said that the study included unidentified brains, one of which was Seau's, and that the findings on Seau were similar to autopsies of people "with exposure to repetitive head injuries.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|