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SPORTS
August 31, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once a hard-driving fullback for the Eagles, Kevin Turner no longer has the hand strength to grasp a straw. That helps explain why Turner considered Thursday's news of a settlement between the National Football League and former NFL players suing the league to be as big a victory as any he had experienced on the field. Turner, 44, found out he shouldn't have to prove that his many symptoms from his diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, came from his eight seasons in the NFL. A lead plaintiff in the class-action settlement reached between 4,500 former players and the NFL, Turner should receive some of the $765 million the league will pay to settle lawsuits.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NFL had considerable legal defenses in its fight with retired players over injuries caused by the violent collisions that are at the heart of the sport, not the least of those being a contract with the players that substantially restricts lawsuits. But in the face of public opinion, and the potential damage to its image, those defenses likely became much less important to the league. The prospect of slugging it out with the players in a multiyear litigation battle in which damaging information is disclosed and the public is regularly reminded of the sport's sometimes brutal impact on player health likely was a powerful incentive for the league to settle.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen-year-old Imani Gordon thinks a good memory will help her be a better veterinarian someday. So the West Philadelphia student was intrigued when she saw a poster on the train for a Temple University memory study. She had already signed up for Lumosity, an online brain-training program. The study might help too, she thought. Plus, it paid $120. "I just want to improve my memory," she said after finishing preliminary testing at psychologist Jason Chein's neurocognition laboratory last month.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
YOU MIGHT not call him a brainiac, but Dr. Neal Barnard is certainly brainy. He takes care of his gray matter and wants you to take care of yours. He'll be at the Ethical Society Friday night to talk about it. Power Foods for the Brain (Hachette) is Barnard's latest book, and his thinking on food and health is worth paying attention to. Not just because he's a best-selling author, does nutrition research, teaches medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and runs the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, all of which take mental acuity.
NEWS
August 4, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Torres, a computational neuroscientist at Rutgers University, thinks many experts are making a mistake when they focus only on what's malfunctioning in the brains of people with autism. She sees autism as a condition of the whole body in which information from all sorts of sensory channels - movement, touch, pain, vision, temperature - is not reaching the brain properly while messages from the brain that tell the body what to do also are not getting through. "The whole loop is disrupted," she said as she explained two studies published last month in Frontiers in Neuroscience that lay out her theories on the importance of movement as a form of sensation and perception in autism.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tug McGraw. John Vukovich. Johnny Oates. And now Darren Daulton. All four played for the Phillies at Veterans Stadium, and all four developed brain cancer. Is there a connection? The rate of brain cancers in team members from that era appears to be about three times the rate in the adult male population, according to an Inquirer analysis that was reviewed by a University of Pennsylvania epidemiologist. And that elevated rate of brain cancer is statistically significant, though the analysis had certain limitations and the pattern easily could be due to chance, said Penn's Timothy R. Rebbeck.
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
NINE DAYS after undergoing surgery, Darren Daulton has been diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer. Daulton underwent surgery to remove two tumors July 1. But, his battle isn't over. The update on Daulton's condition was released in a statement on 97.5 The Fanatic yesterday afternoon. "[Darren] has returned to his Clearwater [Fla.] area home to continue recuperating amongst his immediate family and friends," the statement read. "He will eventually begin treatments in Florida.
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darren Daulton has returned to his home in Florida to begin his fight against an aggressive form of brain cancer. The former Phillies catcher has glioblastoma, according to a statement released on the Darren Daulton Foundation website. The National Brain Tumor Society places the median survival rate at about 15 months for a person with Daulton's form of brain cancer. That means that 50 percent of the patients live less than 15 months, while the other 50 percent live more than 15 months.
SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darren Daulton was awake, speaking with family and in good spirits after a seven-hour surgery Monday at Jefferson University Hospital to remove two tumors from his brain, his surgeon said. Kevin D. Judy reported that the procedure "went well. " Judy, a professor of neurological surgery at Jefferson, said he hopes to have Daulton home for the Fourth of July. The former Phillies catcher and Philadelphia radio personality will need to rest for three to four weeks before likely undergoing radiation treatment, Judy said.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
LOS ANGELES - Long before he was running the operation from the top floor, Ruben Amaro Jr. was a kid in his late-20s just trying to etch out a place on a big-league roster. In June of 1993, Amaro walked into a veteran-packed home clubhouse at Veterans Stadium and reported for work. The surprising Phillies were already running away with the National League East and there was no way the kid from Penn Charter High was going to screw up or get in anyone's way. So Amaro made sure he stayed in the good graces of the unofficial team captain and clubhouse leader, Darren Daulton.
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