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NEWS
February 23, 1991
The running battle between the Philadelphia Parking Authority and the Parkway Corporation continues to be good news for lawyers . . . And bad news for everyone else. As spelled out in Paul Maryniak's story, the dispute over whether the garage at 15th and Arch streets is safe seems destined for still another day (week? month?) in court. So far, the Authority has spent almost $1 million in legal fees and other expenses, while Parkway's bill is almost $700,000. Almost $2 million - for lawyers?
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The National Transportation Safety Board urged yesterday that tougher standards be developed to upgrade the effectiveness of brakes on jetliners and to improve safety guidelines for aborted takeoffs. The board acknowledged that its recommendations, if adopted, could have far-reaching economic effects on the airlines. Brakes might have to be replaced more often or perhaps even redesigned; planes might have to carry lighter loads of fuel in some circumstances, limiting their range, and heavily loaded aircraft might be restricted from using runways formerly open to them.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It must have seemed to Springfield resident James M. Thiel that things just couldn't get any worse early yesterday. First, the brakes of his 1984 Cadillac El Dorado failed. Next, the vehicle was barreling through the walls and into the living room of a home in the 1100 block of Providence Road, Upper Darby Township. And just when he pulled himself from the car, an occupant of the house appeared before him in boxer shorts, and shouted, "Robber!" Thiel pushed out a living room window and dove headfirst outside.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A car being driven at a private auto auction in Mansfield yesterday lurched out of control and struck 10 bystanders when its brakes failed, state police said. The incident occurred around 12:40 p.m. at the National Automobile Dealers Exchange complex on Route 206 in northern Burlington County. None of the injuries was critical. According to the state police, a Trenton man, Walter Buzinsky, 74, was driving a 1976 Pontiac Grand Prix into one section of the 12-lane auctioning complex, when the car's brakes failed.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who drove his BMW down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art told police Friday he could explain everything: His brakes failed. Emin Faki, 20, turned himself in Friday afternoon at Central Detectives after video surfaced online of his car driving up and down the famed Rocky steps the night before. In the video, the BMW bumps slowly down the steps and attempts to back up several times. At several points, the brake lights appear to come on. But Faki told police his brakes and transmission were giving him trouble, police said.
NEWS
May 28, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you've walked anywhere in Center City during the last two years, you have without a doubt witnessed a phenomenon that could mark the beginning of major social change. Witnessed it, and - almost as surely - not noticed. It is called "the fixie. " Otherwise known as the fixed-gear bicycle, a ride with one speed and no brakes. Mostly college students, couriers and assorted risk-takers ride these things, forsaking the increasingly complex alternatives featuring 27 gears, finely tuned derailleurs, and FAA-worthy brake systems.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013
Q: I find it to be a pain in the butt when I am on the highway and the person in the left lane is driving 40-50 mph. It is called the passing lane, buddy. At what point can I hit the horn or flash my lights? - In a Hurry but not a Rush from Ridley A: Slow down,'bro. It's not worth getting worked up with road rage over some slow driver, because these days you've got a lot of crazy people out there, and there's no telling what they'd do if confronted. Keeping a safe distance and flashing the brights once is cool, but if you keep doing it and the driver still doesn't move to the right, then it could turn into a game of wills.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Brakes, a rock group rehearsing weekdays in a Bala Cynwyd basement, are not American Idol contestants, but they are featured in an H&R Block commercial that has been running during the popular TV show. The five in their 20s who first played together in the Bala Cynwyd Middle School Jazz Band also appeared recentlyon a back-cover advertisement in Rolling Stone. The TV and print ads, the concerts and CDs are steps that the Brakes hope will lead to many road tours, guitarist Matt Kass said.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | By Meredith Dewey, Peter Smolowitz and Aileen Soper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
On a Father's Day that was to have been the first day of the rest of Scott Wisner's life, investigators said there was no initial indication why the Greyhound bus he was driving ran off the Pennsylvania Turnpike and crashed early Saturday, killing Wisner, his wife, and a boy they'd helped raise. Federal investigators yesterday were studying a brake system, taillights and road surfaces as they tried to unravel the mystery behind the crash of the bus and a truck. Four other passengers were killed and 18 people were injured in the accident, which occurred at 4:18 a.m. when the New York-to-Pittsburgh bus veered off the turnpike and slammed into a tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder of the rain-covered road about 50 miles west of Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bad brakes. Too much weight. Faulty lights. Those were the most common violations police and state inspectors found as they pulled truck after truck off Interstate 95 near the Philadelphia International Airport yesterday. Then the trucks stopped coming. Holstein Avenue grew quiet, where earlier that morning a line of idling tractor-trailers at the impromptu checkpoint had noisily competed with the roar of jets overhead. "As far back as Maryland, they know we're up here," said Pennsylvania Department of Transportation inspector Pierre Cornelius.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Over the past 200 years, the country has lost half of its wetlands. Even in this era of environmental awareness, the rate has accelerated from 60,000 acres a year in 1998 to 80,000 a year in 2009. This matters because wetlands filter water for plants and animals that are integral parts of the food chain and provide rest stops for migratory birds. They also serve as a sponge in storms, protecting people and property. Some of New Jersey's wetlands have the misfortune of being near its popular beach towns.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Paul Nussbaum, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Federal Railroad Administration ordered Amtrak on Saturday to immediately install an electronic braking system at the Frankford curve that - if it had been in place last week - likely would have prevented the train derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Amtrak officials said the system would be in place by the time the damaged line is reopened, perhaps as early as Tuesday, and "most certainly will be safer. " Service between Philadelphia and New York remains suspended through Monday, affecting thousands of commuters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
On Valentine's Day 2014, Adrien Reju played a set of what she called "unconventional love songs" at the Fire. The singer-songwriter covered songs by Sonny Bono, Lou Reed, Skeeter Davis, and others, and the show sent her down the path that led to her second full-length album, Strange Love and the Secret Language . "My choices for that show were a little more wacky or quirky," says Reju, who will perform a solo show Friday night at Burlap &...
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
If Amtrak Train 188 had been heading to Philadelphia from New York City, it would not have derailed at the sharp Frankford Junction curve, because an automatic braking mechanism has been in place for years on the southbound side of the tracks to stop a speeding train. But Amtrak never installed the same electronics on the northbound side, so Train 188 was able to enter the curve where the speed limit is 50 m.p.h. at more than 100 m.p.h. Amtrak CEO Joseph Boardman said in an interview that the lack of the automatic-braking control on one side of the curve was "a loophole" that he was unaware of until Train 188 derailed Tuesday, killing eight people and injuring about 200. The death toll rose by one Thursday, when the eighth victim was found in the wreckage of the mangled first passenger car. Mayor Nutter said officials now believe all 243 people who were on the train have been accounted for. The eight victims have been identified through various sources as Jim Gaines, 48, an Associated Press employee, of Plainsboro, N.J.; Abid Gilani, 55, a bank executive, of Rockville, Md.; Bob Gildersleeve, 45, an Ecolab executive, of Elkridge, Md.; Giuseppe Piras, 41, an olive-oil and wine merchant, of Italy; Justin Zemser, 20, a U.S. Naval Academy midshipman; and three passengers from New York City - Laura Finamore, 47, a corporate real estate officer; Derrick Griffith, 42, a dean at Medgar Evers College; and Rachel Jacobs, 39, an online start-up executive.
SPORTS
January 29, 2015 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Octorara's Tarojae Brake needed 16 points to reach 1,000 heading into Tuesday night's Ches-Mont American League contest. The senior guard scored exactly that in a 61-56 win at West Chester Rustin. He hit the milestone on a free throw in the fourth. In other Ches-Mont games: John Rodriguez's 15 points helped Coatesville beat visiting Downingtown West, 56-48, and move the two teams into a tie atop the National division. Cary Angeline pumped in 39 points, and Downingtown East won at Unionville, 61-45.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | Michelle Singletary
THERE ARE SOME things you want to run long. I like two-week vacations so I can have time to wind down. A week is just not enough. If you're an investor, the best thing going is that you have a long time to let your money work for you. But the one thing you don't want to be too long is your auto loan. An increasing percentage of car buyers are opting to stretch their monthly car payments far longer than the traditional four-year loan. Edmunds.com noted that in October, the average new car loan was 67 months, making it the second-highest average term on record.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council President Darrell L. Clarke said Tuesday that legislation on the proposed sale of the Philadelphia Gas Works would not be introduced before the summer recess, drawing a sharp rebuke from Nutter administration officials who have been urging Council to start moving on the $1.86 billion deal. Suzanne Biemiller, the mayor's first deputy chief of staff, said Clarke's decision could jeopardize the sale of the city-owned utility to UIL Holdings Corp. of Connecticut, which can opt out of the deal as of July 15. "Obviously, the decision will be theirs to make, and we hope they'll stick around," Biemiller said.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
J ET MAGAZINE, which first hit newsstands in 1951 to cover issues impacting African-Americans, is ceasing regular print publication and going all digital. Johnson Publishing, which owns both Jet and Ebony , says the switch will occur at the end of next month. The Chicago-based company says the move is a proactive effort to adapt to its readers' growing desires for quicker and easier access to information. Jet , conceived by Johnson Publishing founder John Johnson , publishes every three weeks, but will soon be able to update every three seconds.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
DESPITE persistent polarization in Washington, a bipartisan consensus is emerging around the proposition that too many Americans are incarcerated for too long. Democrats tend to emphasize the injustice of excessive sentences that disproportionately affect racial minorities. Republicans are more likely to stress the cost of over-incarceration. But the common ground is real and significant. Last week, by a vote of 13 to 5, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved the Smarter Sentencing Act, sponsored by Sens.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're a 62-year-old man who's ready, willing, and eager to take Social Security's offer of early retirement. There's just one pesky detail. Although you're well-fixed financially, you can't afford hundreds of thousands of dollars in uninsured medical bills. And your wife, a 55-year-old cancer survivor worried about a relapse, can't get insurance. At least that was so last year, when you were still "job-locked" - stuck by your family's need for insurance in a position you'd be happy to give up, perhaps to a recent college grad struggling to find work.
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