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NEWS
February 23, 1991
The running battle between the Philadelphia Parking Authority and the Parkway Corporation continues to be good news for lawyers . . . And bad news for everyone else. As spelled out in Paul Maryniak's story, the dispute over whether the garage at 15th and Arch streets is safe seems destined for still another day (week? month?) in court. So far, the Authority has spent almost $1 million in legal fees and other expenses, while Parkway's bill is almost $700,000. Almost $2 million - for lawyers?
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The National Transportation Safety Board urged yesterday that tougher standards be developed to upgrade the effectiveness of brakes on jetliners and to improve safety guidelines for aborted takeoffs. The board acknowledged that its recommendations, if adopted, could have far-reaching economic effects on the airlines. Brakes might have to be replaced more often or perhaps even redesigned; planes might have to carry lighter loads of fuel in some circumstances, limiting their range, and heavily loaded aircraft might be restricted from using runways formerly open to them.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It must have seemed to Springfield resident James M. Thiel that things just couldn't get any worse early yesterday. First, the brakes of his 1984 Cadillac El Dorado failed. Next, the vehicle was barreling through the walls and into the living room of a home in the 1100 block of Providence Road, Upper Darby Township. And just when he pulled himself from the car, an occupant of the house appeared before him in boxer shorts, and shouted, "Robber!" Thiel pushed out a living room window and dove headfirst outside.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A car being driven at a private auto auction in Mansfield yesterday lurched out of control and struck 10 bystanders when its brakes failed, state police said. The incident occurred around 12:40 p.m. at the National Automobile Dealers Exchange complex on Route 206 in northern Burlington County. None of the injuries was critical. According to the state police, a Trenton man, Walter Buzinsky, 74, was driving a 1976 Pontiac Grand Prix into one section of the 12-lane auctioning complex, when the car's brakes failed.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who drove his BMW down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art told police Friday he could explain everything: His brakes failed. Emin Faki, 20, turned himself in Friday afternoon at Central Detectives after video surfaced online of his car driving up and down the famed Rocky steps the night before. In the video, the BMW bumps slowly down the steps and attempts to back up several times. At several points, the brake lights appear to come on. But Faki told police his brakes and transmission were giving him trouble, police said.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
ISSUE | TRAFFIC COURT Credit to Castille It was wonderful to see the Inquirer recognize voters for their sensible decision to remove Philadelphia Traffic Court from the Pennsylvania Constitution last week, ending years of corrupt practices ("For Traffic Court, voters decide the fix is out," Friday). The article did a good job of recounting the court's history, but people should know that the charge for change was led by then-state Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille.
NEWS
May 28, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you've walked anywhere in Center City during the last two years, you have without a doubt witnessed a phenomenon that could mark the beginning of major social change. Witnessed it, and - almost as surely - not noticed. It is called "the fixie. " Otherwise known as the fixed-gear bicycle, a ride with one speed and no brakes. Mostly college students, couriers and assorted risk-takers ride these things, forsaking the increasingly complex alternatives featuring 27 gears, finely tuned derailleurs, and FAA-worthy brake systems.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013
Q: I find it to be a pain in the butt when I am on the highway and the person in the left lane is driving 40-50 mph. It is called the passing lane, buddy. At what point can I hit the horn or flash my lights? - In a Hurry but not a Rush from Ridley A: Slow down,'bro. It's not worth getting worked up with road rage over some slow driver, because these days you've got a lot of crazy people out there, and there's no telling what they'd do if confronted. Keeping a safe distance and flashing the brights once is cool, but if you keep doing it and the driver still doesn't move to the right, then it could turn into a game of wills.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Brakes, a rock group rehearsing weekdays in a Bala Cynwyd basement, are not American Idol contestants, but they are featured in an H&R Block commercial that has been running during the popular TV show. The five in their 20s who first played together in the Bala Cynwyd Middle School Jazz Band also appeared recentlyon a back-cover advertisement in Rolling Stone. The TV and print ads, the concerts and CDs are steps that the Brakes hope will lead to many road tours, guitarist Matt Kass said.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | By Meredith Dewey, Peter Smolowitz and Aileen Soper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
On a Father's Day that was to have been the first day of the rest of Scott Wisner's life, investigators said there was no initial indication why the Greyhound bus he was driving ran off the Pennsylvania Turnpike and crashed early Saturday, killing Wisner, his wife, and a boy they'd helped raise. Federal investigators yesterday were studying a brake system, taillights and road surfaces as they tried to unravel the mystery behind the crash of the bus and a truck. Four other passengers were killed and 18 people were injured in the accident, which occurred at 4:18 a.m. when the New York-to-Pittsburgh bus veered off the turnpike and slammed into a tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder of the rain-covered road about 50 miles west of Harrisburg.
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NEWS
August 30, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Insurance unaffordable I am worried about proposed health-insurance rate hikes proposed for next year. Aetna has requested an 18 percent increase for its HMO, and Independence Blue Cross's Keystone Health Plan East, also an HMO, has proposed a 13 percent increase. Medical treatments are getting pricier every year, and a recent study by the University of Michigan found that patients are bearing a much larger share of that cost. According to the four-year study, deductibles rose 86 percent and coinsurance costs increased 33 percent.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey's gas tax isn't going up - at least for the holiday weekend. The Senate did not hold a vote Thursday on legislation to raise the tax to replenish the state's fund for roads and bridges, spurning a call by Gov. Christie to resolve the crisis before the fiscal year ended Thursday. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said he didn't believe there was enough support in his chamber to advance legislation, backed by Christie, that the Assembly passed this week.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
At some point during the early-morning hours Tuesday, Gov. Christie and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto walked into a Statehouse hallway for a public hug on a $34.8 billion budget deal that wasn't really a deal, because the hug was missing Senate President Steve Sweeney - as well as a requisite dose of fiscal sense. Christie and Prieto (D., Hudson) agreed to raise New Jersey's gas tax from the nation's second-lowest, 14.5 cents a gallon, to its seventh-highest, 37.5 cents. That would raise $16 billion over the next eight years to support badly needed road, bridge, and mass transit repairs.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
ISSUE | TRAFFIC COURT Credit to Castille It was wonderful to see the Inquirer recognize voters for their sensible decision to remove Philadelphia Traffic Court from the Pennsylvania Constitution last week, ending years of corrupt practices ("For Traffic Court, voters decide the fix is out," Friday). The article did a good job of recounting the court's history, but people should know that the charge for change was led by then-state Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
SEPTA and two energy services firms announced Thursday they had teamed up to expand the first-of-its-kind battery storage system that captures power from braking trains on the city's two subway systems. Constellation Energy Resources, a Baltimore subsidiary of Exelon Corp., will pay for and install battery systems at seven SEPTA electrical substations on the transit system, which will capture and store power produced from the subway's regenerative brakes. Viridity Energy, a Philadelphia firm, will bid the stored power into the regional energy grid, which pays a fee to suppliers that can instantly match generation with demand to maintain the desired electrical frequency on the network.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
SAYING THEY DON'T want money or limousine rides to watch a developer's dog-and-pony shows, a coalition of African-American civic and religious leaders yesterday urged City Council not to approve zoning legislation for a South Philadelphia casino and hotel project until it investigates racial discrimination allegations against the project's Baltimore developer. The coalition members also asked Council to schedule a special hearing to address the discrimination claims separate from Monday's Rules Committee hearing during which the zoning legislation will be addressed.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Over the past 200 years, the country has lost half of its wetlands. Even in this era of environmental awareness, the rate has accelerated from 60,000 acres a year in 1998 to 80,000 a year in 2009. This matters because wetlands filter water for plants and animals that are integral parts of the food chain and provide rest stops for migratory birds. They also serve as a sponge in storms, protecting people and property. Some of New Jersey's wetlands have the misfortune of being near its popular beach towns.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Paul Nussbaum, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Federal Railroad Administration ordered Amtrak on Saturday to immediately install an electronic braking system at the Frankford curve that - if it had been in place last week - likely would have prevented the train derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Amtrak officials said the system would be in place by the time the damaged line is reopened, perhaps as early as Tuesday, and "most certainly will be safer. " Service between Philadelphia and New York remains suspended through Monday, affecting thousands of commuters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
On Valentine's Day 2014, Adrien Reju played a set of what she called "unconventional love songs" at the Fire. The singer-songwriter covered songs by Sonny Bono, Lou Reed, Skeeter Davis, and others, and the show sent her down the path that led to her second full-length album, Strange Love and the Secret Language . "My choices for that show were a little more wacky or quirky," says Reju, who will perform a solo show Friday night at Burlap &...
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