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Bram Stoker

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1990 | By Jeff Seiken, Special to The Inquirer
His entrance is unforgettable. He strides down the staircase trailing his silky black cape, curling his lips and fixing the camera with a hypnotic stare. As if any doubt to his identity could possibly exist, he offers a simple declaration: "I am Dracula. " With that brief pronouncement, Bela Lugosi established himself as a movie icon. His performance in the 1931 Dracula typecast him for life, making his name synonymous with the king of the undead, whom he managed to bring so uncannily to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you happen to be in the neighborhood of 20th Street and Delancey Place over the next couple of months, better keep your neck covered. Especially if you're a young woman. Dracula, the vampire, has a taste for young women's blood. Some people say Dracula is just a legend. Some people say Dracula is dead. Ha! If Dracula's dead, how come so many people in so many places are celebrating his 100th birthday? Answer that, you doubters. Actually, it's not his 100th birthday; vampires, the undead, live for centuries.
NEWS
October 20, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vampire whose unquenchable thirst for blood Bram Stoker chronicled in the 1897 classic, Dracula, has returned. Again. And once again, history's ultimate revenant has oozed into our world out of the dread pen of a Stoker. The count's postmodern, postmortem return was engineered by Stoker's great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker - coauthor, with Dracula expert and screenwriter Ian Holt, of Dracula the Un-Dead, a terrific and terrifically bloody sequel to Bram's book, set in London 20 years after the first book closes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Shot in glorious black and white - with only the dark, drippy red of human blood adding color to the palette - Guy Maddin's Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary (. out of four stars) is a sublimely strange, erotic, goofy pastiche of dance and drama, bloodsucking depravity, and decadent allure. Maddin's whole body of work (including Tales From the Gimli Hospital, Careful, and the forthcoming The Saddest Music in the World, with Isabella Rossellini) is steeped in a bygone era of cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Since Bela "I never drink . . . wine" Lugosi, a cortege of actors has gone down for the count in Dracula movies and assorted vampire variations. But as soon as Klaus Kinski enters Nosferatu, you know you are in for something very special and deeply unsettling. The head is shriveled to an animated skull, the eyes possessed and sunken, the ears spread like batwings and the nails grown into talons. Werner Herzog's purist restoration of the Dracula legend came out in 1979, the same year as George Hamilton's infantile Love at First Bite and Frank Langella's suavely sensual Dracula.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
IN OCTOBER, we enjoy vampires in all forms, from live performances of "Nosferatu" to screenings of campy films such as Tim Burton's "Dark Shadows. " But nothing can outdo Bram Stoker's original opus, "Dracula. " Watch a performance of the tale in an unexpected form this weekend, produced by West Chester's Brandywine Ballet. The ballet, choreographed by the company's own Nancy Page, takes one liberty with Stoker's original plot: The story is reimagined as a tragic romance between the characters Mina and Dracula.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We live in a knowing age. Today, if some chaste young thing wakes up feeling listless, drained of blood, with two puncture wounds on her neck, we all know: It's Dracula. But in 1897, when Bram Stoker wrote his classic about the Transylvanian count, his characters were such bumblers it was almost humorous. Lucy, for instance, was tucked safely into bed, garlic around her neck and around the window. Then one of those ubiquitous British servants came in, said the equivalent of "EEEeeaaau!
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents who would like a chance in the spotlight are invited to audition for parts in the thriller, Dracula, to be performed by the Haddonfield Plays and Players in late October through early November. The auditions will be held tonight and tomorrow night at 7:30 in the Performing Arts Center, 957 S. Atlantic Ave., Haddonfield. Dracula, also called The Vampire Play, is a show based on the Bram Stoker novel, said Alan Rosen, who directs and also does public relations for Haddonfield Plays and Players.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stake that was driven through Dracula's heart at the end of the Bram Stoker novel that introduced the vampire to the world did not do a very good job of killing the fanged fellow, and it certainly hasn't kept him in his coffin. He keeps being brought back in films and on stage for yet another swoop. The latest vehicle for transporting Dracula back from the undead is a stage piece called Others, which the theater group Bricolage performed last night at the Painted Bride Art Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The earnest souls at Universal Pictures have requested that critics writing about Van Helsing "refrain from revealing plot developments involving the characters of Van Helsing (Hugh Jackman) and Anna Valerious (Kate Beckinsale) in the final 30 minutes. " As if anyone who's endured the preceding 102 minutes of monster-movie hokum - a turgid gurgle of cheesy special effects and charisma-less characters cloaked in Comic-Con couture - is likely to care. They may not even be awake. Like last year's gigantic bore The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Stephen Sommers' Van Helsing takes a batch of popular figures from literature (and the movies)
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NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's something wonderfully preposterous about Showtime's Penny Dreadful , an exciting nouveau-Gothic series about a group of characters from 19th-century novels who band together to fight evil. Eva Green plays the pivotal role of Vanessa Ives, a luscious Catholic sinner and psychic medium whose best friend, Mina Harker (from Bram Stoker's Dracula ) is taken by a devilish vampire-demon known only as the Master. Vanessa joins forces with Mina's father, renowned explorer and mountain climber Sir Malcolm (Timothy Dalton at his virile, thunderous best)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Newhart will be remembered centuries hence as one of the greatest straight men in American comedy. The soft-spoken stand-up comic and actor who has the deadliest deadpan in the biz and the driest of humors was singularly brilliant in his first major sitcom, The Bob Newhart Show , which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1972 to 1978. In a great character choice, Newhart plays a therapist, Dr. Bob Hartley. Consistently calm in the midst of chaos, Bob listens in each episode to the strange and hilarious problems of a slew of series regulars who bare their souls to him. Florida Friebus has gone down in TV history for playing one of Bob's patients, Lillian Bakerman, an elderly woman who spends her therapy sessions knitting.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2014 | By Raymond M. Lane, For The Inquirer
SLIGO, Ireland - "The landscape isn't, strictly speaking, necessary," said Helen Vendler of Harvard University. She has written about and teaches about Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet William Butler Yeats and other great writers and had some advice about the presumed pleasure of combining place with poetry - a lure to which all too many literary junkies fall prey. My librarian wife and I knew the wordy part about Ireland fairly well, and where to find some of its low-land temples.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* DRACULA. 10 tonight, NBC10. * SPRINGSTEEN AND I. 9 tonight, Showtime.   NBC SETS the wayback machine for Victorian London tonight in "Dracula," a lavish-ish new costume drama with a cold, dead heart at its center. That would be Vlad/Dracula himself, who, in his latest incarnation, is played by Jonathan Rhys Meyers ("The Tudors") in one of the dullest outings yet for both character and actor. I blow hot and cold on vampires, getting perhaps a bit too excited a few weeks ago to receive a review DVD set of "Kindred: The Embraced" - which lasted just eight episodes in 1996 - but rolling my eyes through "Twilight," longing for a sequel in which "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" slapped some sense into Bella.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to blame Jonathan Rhys Meyers for signing up to star in - and produce - NBC's neo-Gothic, Victorian-period thriller, Dracula , which premieres Friday at 10 p.m. following Grimm 's third season opener. The Tudors heartthrob, who gave female fans shudders as Henry VIII, looks so good in those billowy white shirts that thesps since Valentino and Errol Flynn have worn in period dramas, it would have been hard to pass up the chance to play another monstrously ravenous, impeccably-dressed seducer and killer of women.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
By Douglas Brode The annual observance of Halloween as an unofficial American holiday makes one wonder: Why are many supposedly normal people attracted by the dark side? The success of The Twilight Saga , The Vampire Diaries , and other current vampire tales raises a more specific question: What's behind the allure of this particular creature of the night? Vampires are not new. In Western culture, this unique beast can be traced back to the Bible. In its unexpurgated form, the Hebraic Torah contains a "first wife" of Adam, Lilith, who subsists on human flesh.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
IN OCTOBER, we enjoy vampires in all forms, from live performances of "Nosferatu" to screenings of campy films such as Tim Burton's "Dark Shadows. " But nothing can outdo Bram Stoker's original opus, "Dracula. " Watch a performance of the tale in an unexpected form this weekend, produced by West Chester's Brandywine Ballet. The ballet, choreographed by the company's own Nancy Page, takes one liberty with Stoker's original plot: The story is reimagined as a tragic romance between the characters Mina and Dracula.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | By Amber South, PUBLIC OPINION
Zombies can eat you alive. Vampires can drink your blood. Werewolves can tear you to shreds. Witches can turn you into a frog, or anything else for that matter. Despite the horrible fates that these monsters and others can force upon a human, the fear people once had of such mythical figures has gone way down even though Hollywood has made them more real than ever before, with movies and TV shows that depict vampires and company walking among us. Burt Raifsnider is essentially an expert on making monsters come alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011
'FIGHT' FANS BE 'DAMNED' With a name as recognizable as it is unpronounceable, cult author Chuck Palahniuk has gained fame for writing delightfully disturbing novels about a fight club, aging porn stars and a man who pretends to choke in restaurants. He will read from his new book, "Damned," at a Free Library event tomorrow. Palahniuk's shock-value work has been hailed as the voice of Generation X, a generation of men raised by single women and a generation for whom sex, because of HIV, would always be linked to death.
NEWS
October 20, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vampire whose unquenchable thirst for blood Bram Stoker chronicled in the 1897 classic, Dracula, has returned. Again. And once again, history's ultimate revenant has oozed into our world out of the dread pen of a Stoker. The count's postmodern, postmortem return was engineered by Stoker's great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker - coauthor, with Dracula expert and screenwriter Ian Holt, of Dracula the Un-Dead, a terrific and terrifically bloody sequel to Bram's book, set in London 20 years after the first book closes.
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