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Brandenburg Gate

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NEWS
October 30, 1992 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT NO LONGER FOR THIS MONSTER Not long ago we told you about a trawler in the Irish Sea that caught a really big sturgeon. Turned out it was the USS Sturgeon, a 4,640-ton, nuclear- powered submarine that finally made its escape. Well, we now receive word of another big sturgeon being caught, this time in China. The official Xinhua news agency reports that a monster sturgeon as big as a minibus has been caught in the Yangtze River. Scientists say it could be 100 years old. The female sturgeon, which weighs 1,100 pounds and is 17 feet long, was netted Monday by researchers at the China Sturgeon Artificial Reproduction Institute.
NEWS
July 21, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama wants to speak at the Brandenburg Gate. He figures it would be a nice backdrop. The supporting cast - a cheering audience and a few fainting frauleins - would be a picturesque way to bolster his foreign-policy credentials. What Obama does not seem to understand is that the Brandenburg Gate is something you earn. President Reagan earned the right to speak there because his relentless pressure had brought the Soviet empire to its knees, and he was demanding its final "tear down this wall" liquidation.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
BERLIN - President Obama on Wednesday called for reducing the number of deployed U.S. strategic nuclear warheads by one-third if the Russian government agrees to a similar cut, reviving a goal outlined early in his presidency to work toward a world without nuclear weapons. Obama's proposal, which met with a cool reception in Moscow, came during a much-anticipated speech here that sought to shake Western nations from complacency that he said has taken hold since the end of the Cold War. Speaking at the Brandenburg Gate, a historic backdrop for U.S. presidents, Obama said the dissolution of the Soviet Union has brought "a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a young man on a ladder above him chiseled off chunks of the infamous Berlin Wall, Rudolf Borchardt bent to scoop up a couple of red-flecked pieces. "These little bits of history mean a lot to me," Borchardt said. "They are going up on my mantelpiece. " The 63-year-old insurance man fled to the West through the nearby Brandenburg Gate in 1961, just a week before the wall was flung up. He spoke to the steady rat-a-tat-tat of hammers striking chisels as dozens of mauerspechte - "wallpeckers" - assaulted the reinforced concrete barrier that was the symbol of the Cold War until it was opened on Nov. 9. Some of the wallpeckers are tourists, but others are entrepreneurs who peddle the pieces on the spot for prices ranging from one to 100 deutsche marks (60 cents to $60)
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
In an event that ranks somewhere between the opening of the Brandenburg Gate and the opening of a Bud Light, the Spring Garden Tunnel reopened last weekend after 504 days behind barricades. There were no fireworks, no ribbon-cutting, no speeches. But there were plenty of happy drivers. Let history note, the auspicious moment occurred a few minutes after 2 p.m. on Friday. "The work crew just slid the wooden barriers out of the way, and opened it to traffic" said Joseph Syrnick, the Streets Department's chief engineer and surveyor.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - New Secretary of State John Kerry reported for duty Monday, acknowledging that as Hillary Rodham Clinton's successor, he has "big heels to fill" and promising to protect U.S. Foreign Service workers from terrorist attacks overseas. On his first day at the office in his new job, the former senator and 2004 Democratic presidential candidate was greeted with loud cheers by employees of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development. As the first man in the post in eight years, Kerry referred to his two most recent predecessors, Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, by asking in jest: "Can a man actually run the State Department?"
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A popular new music station here uses the call letters JFK radio and recently plastered billboards around the city proclaiming "Ich bin ein Berliner. " One of the most frequently heard quotes in Berlin comes from none other than Ronald Reagan, the words uttered during his 1987 appearance in front of the Berlin Wall: "Mr. Gorbachev. Tear down this wall!" The demand was derided as ludicrous at the time, but has been quoted since as eerily prophetic. In some world capitals, U.S. presidents come and go, leaving little more than parade litter behind.
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One evening in the winter of 1961-62, a shuttered military train left Frankfurt, headed here through Communist East Germany. The drawn curtains and sealed outer doors were meant to keep us - U.S. troops on weekend leave - from turning a childish prank (mooning, perhaps) into an international incident. But at first light, I opened a curtain edge and, as the train slowed through a country town, I glimpsed the only person on the strangely barren platform: a teenager in a handsome tan overcoat with bright red piping along his lapels, a red star on his fur cap and an impressively ominous machine gun strapped across his chest.
SPORTS
September 29, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Haile Gebrselassie smashed his marathon world record by 27 seconds yesterday, winning the Berlin Marathon in a city where he has had so much success. The 35-year-old Ethiopian took advantage of excellent conditions on a flat course to finish in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 59 seconds. Despite an ailing calf he shattered the mark he set in Berlin last year and became the first man to win this race three times. In the women's race, Germany's Irina Mikitenko won in 2:19:19. She improved her personal best by more than four minutes to record the seventh fastest time for a woman.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | THE ECONOMIST
In death as in life, Rudolf Hess has been a bother to the three Western allied powers in Berlin, especially the British. Hitler's former deputy died at the age of 93 in Berlin on Aug. 17. West Germans complain they were misled by the Allies over the circumstances. A first announcement indicated that Hess had died in Spandau prison, where he had been serving a life sentence since 1947 and whose sole inmate he had been since 1966. Another announcement a day later said he had died in a British military hospital after trying to strangle himself with electric cord.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
BERLIN - President Obama on Wednesday called for reducing the number of deployed U.S. strategic nuclear warheads by one-third if the Russian government agrees to a similar cut, reviving a goal outlined early in his presidency to work toward a world without nuclear weapons. Obama's proposal, which met with a cool reception in Moscow, came during a much-anticipated speech here that sought to shake Western nations from complacency that he said has taken hold since the end of the Cold War. Speaking at the Brandenburg Gate, a historic backdrop for U.S. presidents, Obama said the dissolution of the Soviet Union has brought "a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - New Secretary of State John Kerry reported for duty Monday, acknowledging that as Hillary Rodham Clinton's successor, he has "big heels to fill" and promising to protect U.S. Foreign Service workers from terrorist attacks overseas. On his first day at the office in his new job, the former senator and 2004 Democratic presidential candidate was greeted with loud cheers by employees of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development. As the first man in the post in eight years, Kerry referred to his two most recent predecessors, Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, by asking in jest: "Can a man actually run the State Department?"
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One evening in the winter of 1961-62, a shuttered military train left Frankfurt, headed here through Communist East Germany. The drawn curtains and sealed outer doors were meant to keep us - U.S. troops on weekend leave - from turning a childish prank (mooning, perhaps) into an international incident. But at first light, I opened a curtain edge and, as the train slowed through a country town, I glimpsed the only person on the strangely barren platform: a teenager in a handsome tan overcoat with bright red piping along his lapels, a red star on his fur cap and an impressively ominous machine gun strapped across his chest.
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Ming E. Wong FOR THE INQUIRER
I was sitting in a chic Asian fusion restaurant - they sprout effortlessly here - listening to my friend, Patti, describing the city's charms: "I like it that there is a choice of restaurants and the menus are in English. I like it that Berlin is green, but not so green that it's too spread out. And I love it that they have Wax in the City!" "Wax in the City?" I asked. Apparently, it's a waxing-studio franchise, and it makes my friend, a former resident of Philadelphia and New York City, very happy.
NEWS
May 3, 2009 | By Jenny McIver FOR THE INQUIRER
Fittingly, it all began in a hotel. Away on business, I rushed out of my room, absently grabbing the newspaper on my way. Flipping through it later that day - travel section first, as usual - I noticed a captivating story of a man who had taken a leave of absence from his job, given up all his worldly possessions, and was about to embark on an open-ended trip around the world. I was mesmerized by the possibilities of such a trip. If you had all the time in the world, where would you go?
SPORTS
September 29, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Haile Gebrselassie smashed his marathon world record by 27 seconds yesterday, winning the Berlin Marathon in a city where he has had so much success. The 35-year-old Ethiopian took advantage of excellent conditions on a flat course to finish in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 59 seconds. Despite an ailing calf he shattered the mark he set in Berlin last year and became the first man to win this race three times. In the women's race, Germany's Irina Mikitenko won in 2:19:19. She improved her personal best by more than four minutes to record the seventh fastest time for a woman.
NEWS
July 21, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama wants to speak at the Brandenburg Gate. He figures it would be a nice backdrop. The supporting cast - a cheering audience and a few fainting frauleins - would be a picturesque way to bolster his foreign-policy credentials. What Obama does not seem to understand is that the Brandenburg Gate is something you earn. President Reagan earned the right to speak there because his relentless pressure had brought the Soviet empire to its knees, and he was demanding its final "tear down this wall" liquidation.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
In an event that ranks somewhere between the opening of the Brandenburg Gate and the opening of a Bud Light, the Spring Garden Tunnel reopened last weekend after 504 days behind barricades. There were no fireworks, no ribbon-cutting, no speeches. But there were plenty of happy drivers. Let history note, the auspicious moment occurred a few minutes after 2 p.m. on Friday. "The work crew just slid the wooden barriers out of the way, and opened it to traffic" said Joseph Syrnick, the Streets Department's chief engineer and surveyor.
NEWS
November 7, 1999 | By Lori Montgomery, KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE
Just after midnight on Aug. 13, 1961, thousands of East German troops and police officers began amassing on the border between the Russian sector of Berlin and the American, British and French sectors. Within hours, the city that World War II's victors had divided among themselves was split harshly into free West Berlin and communist East Berlin, sealing the last hole in the Iron Curtain. Just as quickly, the concrete and barbed-wire barrier that East German forces erected that night and would later fortify with mines and automatic machine-gun nests became a graphic symbol of the Cold War between Soviet communism and Western democracy.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Wolfgang Wippermann began teaching about the Holocaust in 1974, elders of Germany's war generation would stand at the back of the lecture hall shrieking that it was a pack of lies. That all changed the following decade, Wippermann recalls, when Germans, in "an almost religious coming to terms" with their Nazi past, packed the lectures and made pilgrimages to the Auschwitz death camp and to Israel. Now, with the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, Germans are running the gauntlet as never before.
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