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Brandon Lee

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NEWS
August 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Since the death of Bruce Lee, the martial arts genre has been without a king. The closest thing to a successor is Steven Seagal, a hulking brute whose trademark limb-breaking and massive body blows made him the leading chock- socky icon during the power-obsessed '80s. Seagal, however, has lately talked of doing more meaningful pictures (yawn) and has clearly lost his taste for action. That leaves a void, one that martial-arts lovers would like to see filled by someone with the exuberant charisma and frenetic martial arts style of Lee. That is clearly the genesis of "Rapid Fire," a movie starring Lee's son, Brandon.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Tragic death and eerie coincidence have already made a notorious movie of "The Crow," which anything-for-a-buck Miramax has tastefully decided to release on Friday the 13th. This movie seems truly cursed. Its star, Brandon Lee, died on the set in a freak accident involving a prop gun just as the production wrapped. There were homicide theories, never proved. Lee is the son of movie/martial arts legend Bruce Lee, who also died at an early age under mysterious circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1994 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Brandon Lee's final film tops this week's list of new movies on video, along with a work from Roman Polanski. THE CROW (1994) (Miramax) 117 minutes. Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson, Michael Wincott. Art imitates death in an opening that sees Lee, who died during production, rising from his grave and wreaking vengeance on the thugs who murdered him and his fiancee. An unsubtle revenge saga, but the virtuoso direction and visual flair from Alex Proyas proclaim the arrival of a major new talent in action films.
LIVING
August 18, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
Their young, beautiful, brooding faces seem to be everywhere you look on the boardwalks at the Jersey Shore: on airbrushed shirts, buttons, hats, keychains, posters. Store owners report they can't keep Brandon Lee and Kurt Cobain items on the shelves. "The deader, the better," explained Larry Graber, co-owner of Cookie's Fun Shop on the boardwalk, who likens the post-mortem popularity of Cobain and Lee to that acquired by Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix. "I've been living off of Morrison and Hendrix for years," said Graber.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Dolph Lundgren: Looks like a skyscraper, kicks like a Rockette. But why would Warners commemorate the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor by putting this Aryan-looking hulk in a Japloitation kickboxing flick that, if viewed by trans-Pacific diplomats, could set back American-Japanese relations by centuries? Showdown in Little Tokyo stars Lundgren - best known as the bionic Soviet boxer in Rocky IV - as a Los Angeles cop whose beat is the downtown neighborhood of Little Tokyo.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Moir was pummeled and pistol-whipped inside a Hunting Park basement that police described as "a scene from Dexter ," the show about a serial killer. The floor and walls were covered with black tarp, Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Mitrick said Friday. A lightbulb dangled overhead. Moir was beaten so forcefully that the chair beneath him had shattered. Moir, now 66, had been lured to the house in the 3800 block of North Eighth Street on Oct. 24, 2008, by a young woman he met through an escort service.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The film year is not likely to yield a sadder irony than the opening of The Crow. Brandon Lee, who died in a gun accident on the set just before the movie was finished, in the film rises from the grave as a man bent on inflicting post-mortem vengeance on the thugs who murdered him. There could hardly be a more macabre case of what has to be called art imitating death. But if the arrival of The Crow - a visually dazzling and hyperkinetic action movie - is an occasion to mourn the loss of Lee, it is also ample reason to celebrate the protean gifts of its director, Alex Proyas.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
They keep punching 'em out, like a factory punches out semis. Or, more to the point, motorcycles. We're talking about the new breed of action movie stars. The rough, tough and, most significantly, reasonably priced musclemen who've been beating bad guys in formulaic features over the last couple of years. The new action-adventure stars such as Brian Bosworth, Jean-Claude van Damme, Jeff Speakman and Brandon Lee are the direct descendants of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone, two generations removed from Bruce Lee and Clint Eastwood, and the current species in an evolutionary process that began with silent swashbuckler Douglas Fairbanks and the Saturday matinee cowboy heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are a couple of scenes in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story - a big, boisterous biopic of the late kung fu movie star - that now seem eerily prescient, and devastatingly sad. Preview audiences who have seen Rob Cohen's lively homage to the American-born, Hong Kong-raised Lee have sighed and even sobbed at Dragon's depiction of the birth and early childhood of Brandon Lee who became a promising action film star, like his father - and died recently under...
NEWS
May 14, 1994 | by Lenore Skenazy, New York Daily News
"It's not that I always expect the worst," says sad-eyed James O'Barr, author of the graphic novel "The Crow. " "It's just that when it happens, I'm not surprised. " Plenty of non-surprises have heaped themselves on O'Barr, 34, the most recent being the death of Brandon Lee last year while filming the movie based on O'Barr's comic. "Everybody felt guilty in some respect, but for me it got to the point where I wished I'd never even written the book," groans the Detroit author, looking like someone who had been slugged in the stomach.
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NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Moir was pummeled and pistol-whipped inside a Hunting Park basement that police described as "a scene from Dexter ," the show about a serial killer. The floor and walls were covered with black tarp, Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Mitrick said Friday. A lightbulb dangled overhead. Moir was beaten so forcefully that the chair beneath him had shattered. Moir, now 66, had been lured to the house in the 3800 block of North Eighth Street on Oct. 24, 2008, by a young woman he met through an escort service.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1994 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Brandon Lee's final film tops this week's list of new movies on video, along with a work from Roman Polanski. THE CROW (1994) (Miramax) 117 minutes. Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson, Michael Wincott. Art imitates death in an opening that sees Lee, who died during production, rising from his grave and wreaking vengeance on the thugs who murdered him and his fiancee. An unsubtle revenge saga, but the virtuoso direction and visual flair from Alex Proyas proclaim the arrival of a major new talent in action films.
LIVING
August 18, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
Their young, beautiful, brooding faces seem to be everywhere you look on the boardwalks at the Jersey Shore: on airbrushed shirts, buttons, hats, keychains, posters. Store owners report they can't keep Brandon Lee and Kurt Cobain items on the shelves. "The deader, the better," explained Larry Graber, co-owner of Cookie's Fun Shop on the boardwalk, who likens the post-mortem popularity of Cobain and Lee to that acquired by Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix. "I've been living off of Morrison and Hendrix for years," said Graber.
NEWS
May 14, 1994 | by Lenore Skenazy, New York Daily News
"It's not that I always expect the worst," says sad-eyed James O'Barr, author of the graphic novel "The Crow. " "It's just that when it happens, I'm not surprised. " Plenty of non-surprises have heaped themselves on O'Barr, 34, the most recent being the death of Brandon Lee last year while filming the movie based on O'Barr's comic. "Everybody felt guilty in some respect, but for me it got to the point where I wished I'd never even written the book," groans the Detroit author, looking like someone who had been slugged in the stomach.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Tragic death and eerie coincidence have already made a notorious movie of "The Crow," which anything-for-a-buck Miramax has tastefully decided to release on Friday the 13th. This movie seems truly cursed. Its star, Brandon Lee, died on the set in a freak accident involving a prop gun just as the production wrapped. There were homicide theories, never proved. Lee is the son of movie/martial arts legend Bruce Lee, who also died at an early age under mysterious circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The film year is not likely to yield a sadder irony than the opening of The Crow. Brandon Lee, who died in a gun accident on the set just before the movie was finished, in the film rises from the grave as a man bent on inflicting post-mortem vengeance on the thugs who murdered him. There could hardly be a more macabre case of what has to be called art imitating death. But if the arrival of The Crow - a visually dazzling and hyperkinetic action movie - is an occasion to mourn the loss of Lee, it is also ample reason to celebrate the protean gifts of its director, Alex Proyas.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story is a wildly entertaining biography of the late martial arts icon that both adheres to and transcends the Hollywood biopic formula. While director Rob Cohen's exuberant eulogy provides the essential historical information about the Hong Kong actor's steerage-to-stardom life (there are a few apocryphal brushstrokes), Dragon is also a boisterous celebration of the chopsocky genre. In its depiction of the relationship between Lee and the perky California blonde who becomes his wife - portrayed with feisty charm by Lauren Holly - Dragon makes a seductive opposites-attract romance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are a couple of scenes in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story - a big, boisterous biopic of the late kung fu movie star - that now seem eerily prescient, and devastatingly sad. Preview audiences who have seen Rob Cohen's lively homage to the American-born, Hong Kong-raised Lee have sighed and even sobbed at Dragon's depiction of the birth and early childhood of Brandon Lee who became a promising action film star, like his father - and died recently under...
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Since the death of Bruce Lee, the martial arts genre has been without a king. The closest thing to a successor is Steven Seagal, a hulking brute whose trademark limb-breaking and massive body blows made him the leading chock- socky icon during the power-obsessed '80s. Seagal, however, has lately talked of doing more meaningful pictures (yawn) and has clearly lost his taste for action. That leaves a void, one that martial-arts lovers would like to see filled by someone with the exuberant charisma and frenetic martial arts style of Lee. That is clearly the genesis of "Rapid Fire," a movie starring Lee's son, Brandon.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Dolph Lundgren: Looks like a skyscraper, kicks like a Rockette. But why would Warners commemorate the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor by putting this Aryan-looking hulk in a Japloitation kickboxing flick that, if viewed by trans-Pacific diplomats, could set back American-Japanese relations by centuries? Showdown in Little Tokyo stars Lundgren - best known as the bionic Soviet boxer in Rocky IV - as a Los Angeles cop whose beat is the downtown neighborhood of Little Tokyo.
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