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Brandywine Creek

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NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a corner of Chester County, on either side of a tree-lined ridge that stretches out from the Welsh Hills, the East and West Branches of the Brandywine Creek gurgle from the ground as cold, pristine springs. For the next 20 miles, the two branches meander south through one of the most picturesque and fastest-developing areas in the Philadelphia region - past forests, meadows, farmland, industrial sites, housing developments and small towns, finally converging just north of Chadds Ford.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
The Williams Co. of Tulsa, Okla., received permission Wednesday from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection to replace a portion of its existing Transco natural gas pipeline in East Brandywine and East Caln Townships, Chester County. The company will be allowed to to use an open-trench method to replace a 30-inch pipeline that crosses the East Branch of the Brandywine Creek and Ludwig's Run with a 42-inch pipeline. The permit addresses runoff and the effects of stream encroachment.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flashing flooding that prompted calls for water rescues overnight is expected to be followed by lasting flooding problems Sunday — and beyond. Boats were brought in overnight to try to get to people trapped by rising water in cars, homes and apartments in Upper Moreland, Abington, Willow Grove and other parts of Montgomery County, according to a dispatcher. As of 3 a.m., Chester Creek was already about eight feet over flood stage and still rising. McDade Boulevard in Darby was also underwater as Darby Creek overflowed.
REAL_ESTATE
July 4, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
John Murphy was in his doctor's office one late-November day in 2013, reading a newspaper "from cover to cover" to pass the time till his appointment. Murphy, a history buff interested in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, came across an application to participate in an auction for the Squire Cheyney Estate in Thornbury Township, Delaware County. In 1777, Thomas Cheyney, a Thornbury farmer, rode on horseback through the British lines and dodged musket balls to alert Gen. George Washington that the Redcoats were about to outflank his army at Brandywine Creek.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was no official signal to open trout-fishing season Saturday morning in Southeastern Pennsylvania - no starting gunshot or horn. But thousands of anglers across the region knew that 8 a.m. meant they could once again break out their tackle boxes and wet a line. So for dozens of fishers standing nearly shoulder-to-shoulder along the West Branch of Brandywine Creek near Coatesville - many had arrived before dawn to claim a spot on the banks - one fisher's first cast was as good a signal as any: lines soon after dunked into the creek, and the brook was open for business.
NEWS
August 20, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paddle just about anywhere in the region and the sweep of history is all around. George Washington's 1776 Christmas-night crossing of the icy Delaware River turned the tide at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton. Coal carried by the Schuylkill ushered in the Industrial Age. The Brandywine Creek supplied gunpowder to the colonies. Two hundred years after the Revolution, the Brandywine seems most at peace, a tableau of Americana that served as inspiration and backdrop for three generations of Wyeths.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
There is no natural feature that defines Chester County better than the Brandywine Creek. We know the Brandywine has inspired paintings and poems, songs and a love of nature in its local residents. But what do people really know about it? First of all, where does the name come from? Some say the Brandywine was named after an early settler named Brandt Wyn but nothing is known about him. Others say the river looks like the color of brandy wine. The waterway starts out as numerous streams trickling down from the Welsh Mountains in Honey Brook Township.
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning flooding that closed roads is likely to get worse in some areas, as rivers keep rising, in some cases until Friday morning. That means some places might still have flooding Saturday. The Delaware River is the biggest worry, predicted to rise more than 11 feet above flood stage at Easton. Here's a list of overflowing rivers and when they should crest, according to the National Weather Service. SCHUYLKILL - At Philadelphia , should crest at 14 feet, 3 feet above flood stage, at 7 p.m. today.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Philadelphia lawyer Curtis P. Cheyney 3d throws around a lot of "ifs" when discussing the life and exploits of his Delaware County ancestor, Squire Thomas Cheyney. Lawyer Cheyney, of Haverford Township, considers the squire to be a Revolutionary War hero at least on a par with that Boston silversmith immortalized in rhyme by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Thomas Cheyney was a Thornbury farmer who in 1777 rode horseback through the British lines and dodged musket balls to alert Gen. George Washington that the redcoats were about to outflank his army at Brandywine Creek.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
After seven years of campaigning by the Brandywine Conservancy, a large portion of Brandywine Creek and its tributaries is on the verge of being designated part of the Pennsylvania "scenic-river" system. A bill imposing scenic-river status on 65.2 miles of the lower Brandywine between the Delaware state line, Coatesville on the west branch and Downingtown on the east branch has already been approved by the state Senate. A similar bill is scheduled for early action in the House of Representatives, according to its sponsor, Rep. Samuel Morris (D., Chester)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
August 1, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Pocopson isn't just another one of those sleepy, historic, sprawling, thinly populated Chester County townships. It does have history, of course, and although the town wasn't established until 1848, 71 years after the Battle of Brandywine, the British did cross the west branch of the creek at Trimble's Ford, now a historic district shared by Pocopson and West Bradford. Pennsbury and East Marlborough - which also were linked to the battle, according to every historical record - "donated" land to form Pocopson Township.
REAL_ESTATE
July 4, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
John Murphy was in his doctor's office one late-November day in 2013, reading a newspaper "from cover to cover" to pass the time till his appointment. Murphy, a history buff interested in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, came across an application to participate in an auction for the Squire Cheyney Estate in Thornbury Township, Delaware County. In 1777, Thomas Cheyney, a Thornbury farmer, rode on horseback through the British lines and dodged musket balls to alert Gen. George Washington that the Redcoats were about to outflank his army at Brandywine Creek.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along both branches of Pennsylvania's Brandywine Creek - in 24 hilly communities west of Philadelphia - about 37,000 acres have been marked off-limits to development. Part is public parkland; most is owned by private landowners who have given up development rights in exchange for lower property taxes and other incentives. The acreage covers nearly a quarter of the land in those communities, an area four times the size of Philadelphia's park system, including Fairmount Park . Is it enough?
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was no official signal to open trout-fishing season Saturday morning in Southeastern Pennsylvania - no starting gunshot or horn. But thousands of anglers across the region knew that 8 a.m. meant they could once again break out their tackle boxes and wet a line. So for dozens of fishers standing nearly shoulder-to-shoulder along the West Branch of Brandywine Creek near Coatesville - many had arrived before dawn to claim a spot on the banks - one fisher's first cast was as good a signal as any: lines soon after dunked into the creek, and the brook was open for business.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a low-tech week with high ideals. No cellphones, no showers, and the cuisine came freeze-dried. Still, 13 Chester County teens shunned modern conveniences in the name of a historic creek and an adventure meant to tap their inner environmentalists. "Because of technology, our generation doesn't know things about the world and how it runs," said Nijia Walls, 15, of Kennett Square. "We never have to do anything for ourselves. " For a week, the teens participated in a mostly do-it-yourself excursion along the Brandywine Creek.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
The Williams Co. of Tulsa, Okla., received permission Wednesday from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection to replace a portion of its existing Transco natural gas pipeline in East Brandywine and East Caln Townships, Chester County. The company will be allowed to to use an open-trench method to replace a 30-inch pipeline that crosses the East Branch of the Brandywine Creek and Ludwig's Run with a 42-inch pipeline. The permit addresses runoff and the effects of stream encroachment.
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning flooding that closed roads is likely to get worse in some areas, as rivers keep rising, in some cases until Friday morning. That means some places might still have flooding Saturday. The Delaware River is the biggest worry, predicted to rise more than 11 feet above flood stage at Easton. Here's a list of overflowing rivers and when they should crest, according to the National Weather Service. SCHUYLKILL - At Philadelphia , should crest at 14 feet, 3 feet above flood stage, at 7 p.m. today.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flashing flooding that prompted calls for water rescues overnight is expected to be followed by lasting flooding problems Sunday — and beyond. Boats were brought in overnight to try to get to people trapped by rising water in cars, homes and apartments in Upper Moreland, Abington, Willow Grove and other parts of Montgomery County, according to a dispatcher. As of 3 a.m., Chester Creek was already about eight feet over flood stage and still rising. McDade Boulevard in Darby was also underwater as Darby Creek overflowed.
NEWS
June 11, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Art Carey, and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In good weather, the Brandywine Creek in Chester County beckons scores of outdoors enthusiasts, who routinely dot the waterway with canoes, kayaks, and inner tubes. On Tuesday, two brothers would have been turned away if they had tried to rent kayaks: Heavy rain had churned up the usually slow-paced creek, creating a muddy, menacing environment that prompted rental businesses to suspend operations. Christopher Miller, 28, of Yonkers, N.Y., and the Rev. Chad Miller, 34, of Wilmington, never got to hear warnings from shop owners.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
There is no natural feature that defines Chester County better than the Brandywine Creek. We know the Brandywine has inspired paintings and poems, songs and a love of nature in its local residents. But what do people really know about it? First of all, where does the name come from? Some say the Brandywine was named after an early settler named Brandt Wyn but nothing is known about him. Others say the river looks like the color of brandy wine. The waterway starts out as numerous streams trickling down from the Welsh Mountains in Honey Brook Township.
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