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NEWS
December 15, 1987 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
Motown - in the driving beat of a big brass band - roars from a boom box in the warehouse where the South Philadelphia Vikings practice for New Year's. Six kids who will turn into costumed spark plugs for the Mummers Parade listen for their song cue. They pop out of a plywood automobile engine and start gyrating. The spark plug dance, in rehearsal since September, is a clever gimmick for the Vikings in the highly competitive fancy brigade division. But what's really new is the music they'll dance to. The Vikings have hired a brass orchestra of 25 professional and college- trained musicians to play "Dancin' in the Streets," "I Feel Good" and the theme from "The Wiz" on their strut up Broad Street.
NEWS
March 2, 1986 | By Robert J. Salgado, Special to The Inquirer
If you have an old house or collect antiques, you may have heard of Ball & Ball of Exton, makers of brass and iron hardware. The company's catalogue can be found in any shop that deals seriously in American or English antique furniture, and some of the hinges, door knockers, latches and hooks produced in Exton are sold by shops specializing in decorative hardware. What you may not know is that Ball & Ball welcomes the walk-in shopper and will reproduce virtually any piece of brass or iron hardware by the same methods used to make the original.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker has named 10 police officials to run three boards that would review the actions of the department's top brass and screen the qualifications of officers seeking promotions and transfers. Chief Inspector Frank Scafidi was named chairman of the accountability board, which also will include Chief Inspector Thomas Roselli and Staff Inspector James Gallagher. The transfer review board will be chaired by Chief Inspector Joseph Orbell and will include Inspector Jerrold Kane and Captain Willie Williams.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A two-day auction to clear the contents of five estates will be conducted next Friday and Saturday by Pook & Pook Auctioneers and Appraisers at Griffith Hall in Ludwigs Corner, Chester County. In the furniture phase of the sale, rare Lancaster County, Colonial Philadelphia, and New England desks, tall case (grandfather) clocks, cupboards and mahogany chest of drawers will be on the block. Featured as well will be a Georgian breakfront, a Chippendale mahogany slant front desk, a northern European highly carved oak settle, and a painted cottage bedroom suite.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents can rub shoulders with nobility - as well as with assorted unicorns, angels, griffins and other interesting specimens - at the London Brass Rubbing Center exhibit that continues through Saturday at the Church of the Good Shepherd, 315 Highland Terrace, Pitman. Brass rubbing is a craft in which heavy paper is placed over an embossed brass plaque and rubbed with a special metallic crayon (silver, gold, copper or black in color) so the image on the brass is repeated on the paper.
FOOD
July 7, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: I have just spent weeks polishing my antique brass bed. How do I keep it "sparkling" and prevent it from tarnishing again? Are there any products on the market that will retard the tarnish? - M.L. The only way to keep your brass bed from tarnishing is to protect the surface of the brass from contact with air. The product that will accomplish this is plain-and-simple clear lacquer, available at paint and hardware stores. Lacquer only a small area first: If you decide you don't like the way it looks, remove the lacquer by rubbing with a soft cloth dipped in denatured alcohol.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Sneak thieves have taken a shine to the antique brass handrails in Broad Street Subway stairwells. In the past three weeks, rustlers have made off with railings from four North Philadelphia stations. "An inventory by SEPTA's Facilities Department revealed missing handrails at Spring Garden, Girard, Dauphin-Susquehanna and North Philadelphia stations," SEPTA spokeswoman Donna Alston said. And on Election Day morning, subway commuters who use the northwest stairwell at Erie station noticed their handrail had been removed.
NEWS
July 8, 1989
The top brass of the Philadelphia Police Department are hitting the streets on night patrols to counteract the shortage of cops. It's not a perfect solution, and it doesn't make up for the fact that there are not enough officers, especially in summer, when so many are on vacation. But it seems like an honest effort to augment the force at a time when money and personnel are strained to the limit. Maybe Police Commissioner Willie Williams has come up with an idea others ought to try. It wouldn't hurt to see the streets commissioner out pushing a broom or the head of Licenses and Inspections doing a little licensing and inspecting.
SPORTS
March 3, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Kurt Warner is being courted by an eager division rival of the Arizona Cardinals. The San Francisco 49ers sent a private jet yesterday for the two-time MVP quarterback, who traveled from Phoenix to the team's training complex for a physical exam and a meeting with top brass. Warner led the Cardinals to the Super Bowl last season, but became a free agent when he didn't re-sign with the club. Arizona has offered a 2-year, $20 million contract to Warner, who will be 38 when training camp opens.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Brassed Off" is one movie that truly deserves to be called an ensemble piece. It's actually about an ensemble - an amateur brass band in the working-class English village of Grimley, where the factory bosses are preparing to close the coal mine that is the community's economic heart and soul. Most of the men who play in the band are miners, and as it becomes increasingly likely that the mine will close, their commitment to just about everything, including music, begins to wane.
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SPORTS
June 5, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
The Phillies are less than a week away from making the first pick in baseball's draft, but they have yet to finalize their selection. General manager Matt Klentak said before Friday's game that the team is down to "a small handful" of options for the franchise's first No. 1 overall pick since 1998. The popular belief is that the Phillies will use that pick Thursday on Florida lefthander A.J. Puk. Other top contenders are Mercer University outfielder Kyle Lewis, Tennessee third baseman Nick Senzel, and California high schoolers Mickey Moniak and Blake Rutherford.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Brass opposed bomb The commentary on the 1945 debate about whether to use atomic bombs to end World War II perpetuates the fiction that "within government circles, there was little question that the bomb should be used" ("The momentous decision to use atomic bombs," Friday). Many prominent military leaders strenuously objected to using the weapon: Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower said that dropping the bomb was "completely unnecessary . . . as a measure to save American lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
The effect of several centuries of collective ear-training in Western music has led us to expect a certain journey in sound: The basic idea is stated. It gets explored. It returns. But what happens when the composer's assignment is to write a piece only three or four minutes long? How much development is desired, or even possible? It was perhaps not a question explicitly put to composers contributing to the Brass Project this past weekend. But two one-hour-long afternoon concerts Saturday and Sunday at the Philadelphia Art Alliance answered nonetheless - in turns tersely, monotonously, sweetly.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
And now, the guys ... The Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia has commissioned a series of Alleluias for retired longtime artistic director Alan Harler. The first two, from two female Philadelphia composers, debuted earlier. Now come two more, from James Primosch and Robert Maggio, to premiere at 4 p.m. Sunday at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion. The rest of the program is interestingly British. Although it flopped when new, Benjamin Britten's excellent Gloriana is represented by its "Choral Dances.
SPORTS
April 29, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
DOUG PEDERSON knows better than anyone how little patience Eagles fans have. On the first play of his first start as Donovan McNabb's placeholder back in 1999, he underthrew Duce Staley on a swing pass out of the backfield. And got booed. It wouldn't be the last time. Pederson was jeered mercilessly in the nine games he started that season, as was the man who decided to keep running him out there for two-plus months while McNabb (mostly) watched and learned, Andy Reid. Eagles fans wanted to see the rookie from Syracuse, ready or not. They didn't want Pederson, a journeyman who had thrown 32 passes in four seasons with Miami and Green Bay. But Reid held his ground.
SPORTS
April 20, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
THE STAKES are high, and they could get even higher for the Eagles, as they approach their first draft with Howie Roseman and Doug Pederson running the show, April 28-30. As Roseman noted Monday, this is only the second time the Birds have drafted in the top 10 during his 15-plus years with the franchise, the other 2013, when they took offensive tackle Lane Johnson fourth. Roseman traded up from 13th to eighth last month in the deal that sent Byron Maxwell and Kiko Alonso to Miami.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
In the political battle that's just begun over his proposal to tax sugary drinks, Mayor Kenney broke bread last Saturday with leaders of Big Soda. Kenney pitched his proposal directly to some of the most influential people in the soft-drink world during a private lunch meeting in swank surroundings, the newspaper has learned. In a back room at Lacroix, the French restaurant on Rittenhouse Square, Kenney and three top aides met with local soda mogul Harold A. Honickman, a few representatives of the Coca-Cola Co., and the chief executive of the American Beverage Association.
SPORTS
February 29, 2016
Jerry Colangelo was back in town Thursday and Friday to meet with 76ers coach Brett Brown and general manager Sam Hinkie. The team's chairman of basketball operations planned to return to Phoenix on Saturday. Colangelo said the discussions were about getting ready for the draft and free agency. But he realizes the transformation from the NBA's worst team to title contender won't happen overnight. Colangelo mentioned that the competitiveness and the excitement displayed after Ish Smith was reacquired on Dec. 24 have leveled off. "So we are a little out of kilter right now, I would think," he said Friday before the home game against the Washington Wizards.
SPORTS
February 28, 2016 | Bob Cooney, STAFF WRITER
IF YOU LOOK at the biggest story line of this horrendous season by the 76ers, it would have to be struggles that big men Jahlil Okafor and Nerlens Noel have had playing together. They struggled again Friday against the Washington Wizards, as they switched positions up and down the floor, with Okafor at the power forward on defense and center on offense, and Noel doing the opposite. The most talked-about subject going into the summer will be the progression of Joel Embiid and how he might be able to come back from the two surgeries on his right foot.
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