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NEWS
December 15, 1987 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
Motown - in the driving beat of a big brass band - roars from a boom box in the warehouse where the South Philadelphia Vikings practice for New Year's. Six kids who will turn into costumed spark plugs for the Mummers Parade listen for their song cue. They pop out of a plywood automobile engine and start gyrating. The spark plug dance, in rehearsal since September, is a clever gimmick for the Vikings in the highly competitive fancy brigade division. But what's really new is the music they'll dance to. The Vikings have hired a brass orchestra of 25 professional and college- trained musicians to play "Dancin' in the Streets," "I Feel Good" and the theme from "The Wiz" on their strut up Broad Street.
NEWS
March 2, 1986 | By Robert J. Salgado, Special to The Inquirer
If you have an old house or collect antiques, you may have heard of Ball & Ball of Exton, makers of brass and iron hardware. The company's catalogue can be found in any shop that deals seriously in American or English antique furniture, and some of the hinges, door knockers, latches and hooks produced in Exton are sold by shops specializing in decorative hardware. What you may not know is that Ball & Ball welcomes the walk-in shopper and will reproduce virtually any piece of brass or iron hardware by the same methods used to make the original.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker has named 10 police officials to run three boards that would review the actions of the department's top brass and screen the qualifications of officers seeking promotions and transfers. Chief Inspector Frank Scafidi was named chairman of the accountability board, which also will include Chief Inspector Thomas Roselli and Staff Inspector James Gallagher. The transfer review board will be chaired by Chief Inspector Joseph Orbell and will include Inspector Jerrold Kane and Captain Willie Williams.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A two-day auction to clear the contents of five estates will be conducted next Friday and Saturday by Pook & Pook Auctioneers and Appraisers at Griffith Hall in Ludwigs Corner, Chester County. In the furniture phase of the sale, rare Lancaster County, Colonial Philadelphia, and New England desks, tall case (grandfather) clocks, cupboards and mahogany chest of drawers will be on the block. Featured as well will be a Georgian breakfront, a Chippendale mahogany slant front desk, a northern European highly carved oak settle, and a painted cottage bedroom suite.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents can rub shoulders with nobility - as well as with assorted unicorns, angels, griffins and other interesting specimens - at the London Brass Rubbing Center exhibit that continues through Saturday at the Church of the Good Shepherd, 315 Highland Terrace, Pitman. Brass rubbing is a craft in which heavy paper is placed over an embossed brass plaque and rubbed with a special metallic crayon (silver, gold, copper or black in color) so the image on the brass is repeated on the paper.
FOOD
July 7, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: I have just spent weeks polishing my antique brass bed. How do I keep it "sparkling" and prevent it from tarnishing again? Are there any products on the market that will retard the tarnish? - M.L. The only way to keep your brass bed from tarnishing is to protect the surface of the brass from contact with air. The product that will accomplish this is plain-and-simple clear lacquer, available at paint and hardware stores. Lacquer only a small area first: If you decide you don't like the way it looks, remove the lacquer by rubbing with a soft cloth dipped in denatured alcohol.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Sneak thieves have taken a shine to the antique brass handrails in Broad Street Subway stairwells. In the past three weeks, rustlers have made off with railings from four North Philadelphia stations. "An inventory by SEPTA's Facilities Department revealed missing handrails at Spring Garden, Girard, Dauphin-Susquehanna and North Philadelphia stations," SEPTA spokeswoman Donna Alston said. And on Election Day morning, subway commuters who use the northwest stairwell at Erie station noticed their handrail had been removed.
NEWS
July 8, 1989
The top brass of the Philadelphia Police Department are hitting the streets on night patrols to counteract the shortage of cops. It's not a perfect solution, and it doesn't make up for the fact that there are not enough officers, especially in summer, when so many are on vacation. But it seems like an honest effort to augment the force at a time when money and personnel are strained to the limit. Maybe Police Commissioner Willie Williams has come up with an idea others ought to try. It wouldn't hurt to see the streets commissioner out pushing a broom or the head of Licenses and Inspections doing a little licensing and inspecting.
SPORTS
March 3, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Kurt Warner is being courted by an eager division rival of the Arizona Cardinals. The San Francisco 49ers sent a private jet yesterday for the two-time MVP quarterback, who traveled from Phoenix to the team's training complex for a physical exam and a meeting with top brass. Warner led the Cardinals to the Super Bowl last season, but became a free agent when he didn't re-sign with the club. Arizona has offered a 2-year, $20 million contract to Warner, who will be 38 when training camp opens.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Brassed Off" is one movie that truly deserves to be called an ensemble piece. It's actually about an ensemble - an amateur brass band in the working-class English village of Grimley, where the factory bosses are preparing to close the coal mine that is the community's economic heart and soul. Most of the men who play in the band are miners, and as it becomes increasingly likely that the mine will close, their commitment to just about everything, including music, begins to wane.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
After winning back their freedom and their jobs, five former members of an elite Philadelphia narcotics squad - acquitted earlier this year on federal corruption charges - have set their sights on new targets: The district attorney, the mayor, and the city's police commissioner. The three city leaders unfairly maligned the officers and made accusations that led to their firings and arrests last year, Officers Thomas Liciardello, Brian Reynolds, Michael Spicer, Perry Betts, and John Speiser alleged in a defamation complaint filed Friday in federal court.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AFTER A FIREFIGHTER killed himself in September 2011 and another attempted suicide last year, a cloud of grief hung over the redbrick firehouse in Ogontz where Engine 51, Ladder 29 and Medic 18 are stationed. Yet that's where Philadelphia fire officials sent a troubled young paramedic not long after her second suicide attempt, sources say. Such insensitivity helped throw an already vulnerable woman into deeper instability, those who know her say. The paramedic, whom the Daily News is not naming because of the nature of the allegations, is now at the center of a sex scandal that has gotten national headlines.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE OFFICERS who lined the front of their district headquarters Saturday stood mostly stone-faced as protesters pelted insults at them:THE OFFICERS who lined the front of their district headquarters Saturday stood mostly stone-faced as protesters pelted insults at them: Murderers! Pigs! Racists! At one point, a black protester got within a breath's reach of a black officer's face and screamed: Sell-out! If I were a Philadelphia police officer, I'd be furious. And not at the protesters who marched to the 15th District headquarters on Frankford Avenue, demanding answers in the December police-related shooting of Brandon Tate-Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Sunny Jain was 5 years old, he traveled to India from his home in Rochester, N.Y., for his uncle's wedding. "It was the first time I saw an Indian brass band," says the leader of the boisterous dhol-and-brass octet Red Baraat. The band, which has just released its third studio album, Gaadi of Truth , will play Saturday night at the Ardmore Music Hall. "I remember taking a nap and waking up and I came outside and the baraat" - the groom's wedding procession - "had already started," says Jain, speaking from his home in Brooklyn.
SPORTS
January 30, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
OF THE FOUR men who began this fall as the general managers of our professional sports franchises, three remain in those jobs. The odd man out was clearly the most successful of the four, helping to build a roster that won 10 of its 16 games despite season-ending injuries to its quarterback and defensive captain; despite spearheading, just a season before, the successful hiring of the most coveted coach at the time, Chip Kelly. Odd man out may be somewhat inaccurate, for Howie Roseman is still with the Eagles organization, but bumped so far upstairs that he will need field glasses to view the assemblage of players he was once chiefly responsible for. In that, he is more exiled than Flyers president Paul Holmgren, who is still consulted by the man who replaced him, or so Ron Hextall says.
SPORTS
July 14, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. and director of player development Joe Jordan couldn't have been more frank when assessing the minor-league system. "There are not enough offensive players in our system," Amaro said last week. "We feel we need to do better than that, and it certainly is something that is a priority for us. " Jordan went further. "We need more of everything," he said. "We are like 29 other teams. " In fairness, the system has helped the team in a few spots this year.
SPORTS
May 15, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
IN THE wake of fans' boos and chants calling for his firing during Saturday's loss, Union manager John Hackworth said yesterday that he feels supported by CEO Nick Sakiewicz and the club's front office and is focused on continuing to try to "put this team in a position where we can be successful. " Speaking on a teleconference with reporters before the team took off for Kansas City ahead of tonight's 8:30 road match against Sporting KC, Hackworth also said he thinks the players have been affected by all the negativity surrounding the club.
SPORTS
May 3, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Well, it was just another week with those chatterbox Eagles. All three major players in the team's hierarchy - Jeffrey Lurie, Chip Kelly, and Howie Roseman - were available to share their thoughts with the public. Blah, blah, blah. You just can't shut up these guys. Kelly emerged to say that releasing DeSean Jackson five weeks ago was a "purely football decision"; Lurie said, "What he said"; and Roseman held a wide-ranging predraft confab with the beat writers in which he confirmed everything except the stuff you couldn't probably figure out on your own. Perhaps all this exposure, which arrived after a month of stonewalling and hiding, was a coincidence, or perhaps an acknowledgment that the organization believes it is time to make nice with the paying public again or toss a bone in its direction.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THERE WERE some mixups, and maybe a few cops who were just plain ticked off. Either way, the Philadelphia Police Department issued a "clarification" missive to officers earlier this week about the department's new interview and interrogation policy, which went into effect on Jan. 1. The memo noted that "it is entirely reasonable under the Fourth Amendment to temporarily detain all persons found at a crime scene. It is also expected," according to a copy obtained by the Daily News . The three-page note makes it clear that temporarily detaining people at a crime scene wouldn't conflict with a passage in Directive 151, the new interview policy, which states that a complainant or witness can refuse to be taken from a crime scene to a detective division for questioning.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
A LOCAL grand jury is investigating two high-ranking Philadelphia police officials who allegedly tried to cover up an arrest in 2012. Inspector Aaron Horne and Capt. John McCloskey are the subjects of the probe, law-enforcement sources have told the Daily News . Both men were suspended by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey for 30 days without pay in August 2012 after an Internal Affairs investigation found that the two commanders had tried to erase all traces of a violent encounter in Oak Lane between a pair of patrol officers and the grandson of a retired Philly cop. Ramsey stopped short of firing Horne and McCloskey, telling the People Paper at the time that both were hard workers who had made mistakes.
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