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Brass Band

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1993 | Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When New Orleans' ReBirth Brass Band is in the house, you just have to dance - even if you don't know how. One of the smartest things that International House did for this New Orleans band's visit Saturday night was to clear out a dance floor in front of the stage. It was well-used. ReBirth is a wild, rough-edged collective of young men faithful to tradition. Beginning its first hourlong set with Fats Domino's "I'm Walkin'," the band's rollicking, polyphonic, chant-laden sound quickly loosened any inhibitions in the diverse crowd.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tyrone Breuninger remembers that his grandfather, Grover, played euphonium at least five nights a week during the 1930s, for bands in East Greenville, Sumneytown, Green Lane, Red Hill and Pennsburg. "Within those five miles, there were five bands," said Breuninger, whose grandfather encouraged him to play the tuba-like euphonium, too, and later the trombone. But the heyday of the brass band has passed. Summer concert schedules are shorter, and at many band shells and parks, Sousa marches and show tunes are heard only on the Fourth of July.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Sunny Jain was 5 years old, he traveled to India from his home in Rochester, N.Y., for his uncle's wedding. "It was the first time I saw an Indian brass band," says the leader of the boisterous dhol-and-brass octet Red Baraat. The band, which has just released its third studio album, Gaadi of Truth , will play Saturday night at the Ardmore Music Hall. "I remember taking a nap and waking up and I came outside and the baraat" - the groom's wedding procession - "had already started," says Jain, speaking from his home in Brooklyn.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tyrone Breuninger remembers that his grandfather, Grover, played euphonium at least five nights a week during the 1930s, for bands here and in Sumneytown, Green Lane, Red Hill and Pennsburg. "Within those five miles, there were five bands," said Breuninger, whose grandfather encouraged him to play the tuba-like euphonium, too, and later the trombone. But the heyday of the brass band has passed. Summer concert schedules are shorter, and at many band shells and parks, Sousa marches and show tunes are heard only on the Fourth of July.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jambalaya Jam, the festival of New Orleans music and food that last year attracted 60,000 people to the Great Plaza at Penn's Landing, will be repeated on the last weekend in May. The four-day shindig will star the classic Dixieland sounds of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and the rhythm and blues of the Neville Brothers, plus Cajun bands, gospel groups and the kind of brass-band street music that last year had Philadelphians joining in giddy,...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The rousing tunes served up with such flair by the defiant brass band of coal miners in Brassed Off! struck a responsive chord in Britain, where the film became a huge hit. Its themes are so timely and universal, the melodies should play just as well here. The miners of Grimley Colliery in a drab, one-industry town in Yorkshire are threatened with the closing of their pit by the government even though it still turns a profit. Using deft and touching strokes, Brassed Off! establishes that what the penny-pinching suits in Whitehall propose means a lot more than the loss of jobs.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Mummers were as playful as the Campbell Kids as they took to South 2nd Street in Pennsport yesterday for their annual Soup Sunday celebration. They made a special effort to put at ease South Philadelphia fans who were concerned about what effect the 1995 Market Street parade might have on Two Street mini-parades like Soup Sunday, and the New Year's Day bash there after the big parade uptown. "The Market Street march will not have any effect on our commitment to 2nd Street," said Tom Kelhower, captain of the Riverfront Comic Brigade.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been 33 years since Olga and Herb Kantaut left West Germany and the culture they grew up with, but yesterday they did a lot more than remember old ways. Under a warm late-summer sun in Northeast Philadelphia, the couple feasted on knockwurst, sauerkraut, German potato salad and German beer. They talked with German friends, and they swayed to German folk music, played by a brass band straight from Bavaria. The Kantauts, from Marlton, N.J., were surrounded by reminders of their heritage - women wearing brightly embroidered dirndl costumes, Germans fluent in the mother tongue, the lively schuhplattler dancing and the hearty toasts that have long characterized ethnic festivities.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS - Gunmen opened fire on dozens of people marching in a neighborhood Mother's Day parade in New Orleans yesterday, wounding at least 19 people, police said. The FBI said that the shootings appeared to be "street violence" and weren't linked to international terrorism. Many of the victims were grazed, and most of the wounds weren't life-threatening, police spokeswoman Remi Braden said. No deaths were reported as of last night. Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas told reporters that a 10-year-old girl was grazed in the shooting about 2 p.m. She was in good condition.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The highlights of this weekend's Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema are musical - a drama about a brass band in Britain, and live accompaniment to the silent classic "The Lost World. " Tomorrow's program includes "Brassed Off!" - starring Ewan MacGregor and Pete Postlethwaite as members of a brass band in a mining town where the coal mine is ready to close. Despite the looming economic disaster, the working-class band resolves to stick together, all the way through the national brass-band competition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
CAPE MAY- Michael Kline hoisted an enormous wrench in one hand as he stepped to the microphone at Cape May Convention Hall on Friday to welcome the audience to the Exit Zero Jazz Festival. The fest producer meant to signify the work that had gone into preparing the three-day festival, which takes over the Victorian Shore town twice a year. The next night, on the same stage, it seemed not every bolt had quite been tightened. Headliner Dr. John appeared more than an hour behind schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Sunny Jain was 5 years old, he traveled to India from his home in Rochester, N.Y., for his uncle's wedding. "It was the first time I saw an Indian brass band," says the leader of the boisterous dhol-and-brass octet Red Baraat. The band, which has just released its third studio album, Gaadi of Truth , will play Saturday night at the Ardmore Music Hall. "I remember taking a nap and waking up and I came outside and the baraat" - the groom's wedding procession - "had already started," says Jain, speaking from his home in Brooklyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival organizers often ponder, "How you gonna get the kids down on the farm?" The Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township, that is - "a 45-minute commute from the city that seems so far away to a lot of people," noted talent booker Jesse Lundy. Last year, for better and worse, the team plugged in some rock-'n'-soul-centric Philly "folks" to motor-vate reluctant travelers, with decidedly mixed results. (Todd Rungren, unwilling to ease on down the acoustic road, will probably not be invited back.)
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
ON A BLUSTERY and damp night last year, I connected with James Gandolfini behind a pickup truck in a Jersey Shore town that had nearly been swept out to sea by Superstorm Sandy. It was a one-sided connection, no doubt, but I felt it nonetheless. " New York Daily News ?" he asked when I introduced myself, "What the hell are you doing up here?" he shot back when I said Philly. I was in Mantoloking, a town I'd heard was damaged worse than most others along the coast. As soon as I got there, though, I realized I was in a very unfamiliar financial bracket.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS - Gunmen opened fire on dozens of people marching in a neighborhood Mother's Day parade in New Orleans yesterday, wounding at least 19 people, police said. The FBI said that the shootings appeared to be "street violence" and weren't linked to international terrorism. Many of the victims were grazed, and most of the wounds weren't life-threatening, police spokeswoman Remi Braden said. No deaths were reported as of last night. Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas told reporters that a 10-year-old girl was grazed in the shooting about 2 p.m. She was in good condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | Freelance
THE LIZZIE Borden murder case is an American legend immortalized in rhyme: Borden would forever be remembered as the privileged New Englander who "took an ax, and gave her mother forty whacks; when she had seen what she had done, she gave her father forty-one. " Germantown's Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion celebrates the 120th anniversary of the Borden murders with a reading of Sharon Pollock's psychological murder mystery "Blood Relations," a speculative play exploring the uncertainties surrounding the case.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Lionel Batiste, 81, the vocalist, bass drummer, and assistant leader of the Treme Brass Band, has died. Fans of the HBO series Treme may not have known Mr. Batiste by name, but they often saw him close up. He was the skinny guy with the big drum in the band, one of the acts regularly featured on the show. Mr. Batiste, known as "Uncle Lionel," had been ill for about a month, said band leader Benny Jones Sr. Mr. Batiste used his drum to stay afloat in the floods after Hurricane Katrina, clarinetist Michael White said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011
THE LATE Pete Postle- thwaite had a gruff epitaph carved for him in last year's hit "The Town," playing a mob boss to reluctant employee/bank robber Ben Affleck. "You're an old man with a [messed] up face who don't know his glory days are behind him," hissed Affleck, who also directed the movie, and who no doubt hired Postlethwaite with that line in mind. If there were a Mount Rushmore for great character actors, Postlethwaite's striking, rocky, blocky mug would be on it. "He wasn't a matinee idol," said director Jim Sheridan in the Hollywood Reporter . "Pete's looks were never going to get him roles as a good-looking Hollywood star.
NEWS
January 2, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The year that came to a close Friday night was a good one for Trombone Shorty, the New Orleans multi-instrumentalist born Troy Andrews, who blew out the old and rang in the new with his accomplished and energetic party band, Orleans Avenue, in a two-hour-plus show at a sold-out World Cafe Live. Shorty, who also plays the trumpet (with popped-out Dizzy Gillespie cheeks), has stood taller than his stage name might lead you to believe for quite some time. The rising band leader, who turns 25 Sunday, was fronting his own brass band by the time he was 6. But while New Orleans music aficionados have been onto the prematurely charismatic prodigy - the younger brother of trumpeter James Andrews and grandson of singer Jessie "Ooh Poo Pah Doo" Hill - the wider world got word only in 2010.
SPORTS
April 2, 2009
SEVEN DAYS to a national championship. March 25 to April 1, 1985   MONDAY, March 25   In Memphis to spend some more time with the Memphis State Tigers. The town is crazy. The basketball program seems a little shady, even to fairly naive eyes. No one knew at the time that the Tigers' appearance in the tournament would end up being vacated because the team used an ineligible player - or about the allegations of point-shaving, for that matter. It was a classic scene: encouraging signs in every store window, desperate scramble for tickets, joyous preparations everywhere.
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