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Bravery

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NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Army narrative describes how Jeffrey F. Zauber, a Cherry Hill native, earned a Distinguished Service Cross for "exceptionally valorous actions" in South Vietnam on Feb. 2, 1969. "While serving as company medic during a mission to relieve a sister unit engaged with an enemy force," Mr. Zauber showed "extraordinary heroism," the June 25, 1969, account reads. "Approaching the combat area, Specialist Zauber's company came under intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
We are Crooked Billet dandies Today is Crooked Billet Day. About a dozen kindergartners missed nary a beat as they lisped their way through this slightly modified rendition of "Yankee Doodle Dandy," the girls in long Colonial dresses and mop caps, the boys in breeches and tri-cornered hats. Crooked Billet Day was held Thursday outside the Crooked Billet Elementary School in Hatboro to commemorate the revolutionary battle of the same name fought on the site of the school May 1, 1778.
NEWS
August 29, 1996
Last night in Plymouth Meeting, they mourned a hero and the men she died trying to save. Hero is a word devalued by being attached too glibly to athletes who merely do what they're paid handsomely to do, or actors who merely pretend to perform fine deeds. But make no mistake, 23-year-old Kim Hunsinger was a hero - and not only because last week she died in a fire trying to save the three retarded men who lived in a group home she managed in Exton, Chester County. Fire officials say Ms. Hunsinger could easily have saved herself when the fire broke out on Aug. 20. Instead, she went to assist John Brentnall, Tom Taylor and Larry McConnell, the three men whom she saw not just as clients, but friends.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrolman Michael Minor was driving solo. It was a slow, rainy morning. The radio was quiet. When the call came - a domestic disturbance on Old York Road - Minor, then a seven-year veteran assigned to the 35th District, jumped on it, even though another officer had originally been sent. He was just a few blocks away. And bored. Pulling up, he saw a man pacing on the porch. It was the father, he'd later find out. Walking up the steps, the front door of the house swung open, and a man stood in the doorway.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | By Joe O'Dowd and Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Officer William O'Leary is a two-time hero. On Friday, O'Leary will receive a commendation in City Hall ceremonies for rescuing two elderly persons from a burning house in South Philadelphia. There'll undoubtedly be a repeat performance - of the ceremonies, that is - for the 36-year-old officer sometime in the future. Early yesterday, O'Leary rescued a 77-year-old woman from her smoke-filled home on Federal Street near 2nd, about a mile from the officer's first heroics.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After nearly half a century of anonymity in the military's vast forgotten archives, one of the Army's most courageous nurses will be honored posthumously Tuesday for her bravery as part of Fort Dix's World War II commemoration. Capt. Florence MacDonald was among the last 20 nurses who, on the night of April 29, 1942, boarded planes to escape the rocky island of Corregidor at the mouth of Manila Bay. The last of Gen. Douglas MacArthur's Philippines outposts, the island was being overrun by a Japanese force that had pounded it with bombings since Dec. 8, 1941.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | Inquirer Photographs by Michael Mally
The USS Donald Cook, a guided missile destroyer, was formally commissioned Friday in a ceremony at Penn's Landing. The ship is named for U.S. Marine Corps Col. Donald Cook, who was wounded during a Vietnam War mission and captured by the Viet Cong. He died in captivity and was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for exceptional bravery. His widow, Laurette Cook, attended.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | PETER TOBIA / Inquirer Staff Photographer
City firefighters guide the casket of firefighter Eric Casiano from St. Helena's Roman Catholic Church on North Fifth Street yesterday as other firefighters stand at attention to pay their respects. Casiano died in the line of duty Monday after fighting a house fire in the 2200 block of North Orianna Street. A member of the force for seven years, Casiano was cited for his bravery in 1994.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY KATHLEEN OROPEZA
WITHOUT QUESTION, the gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., committed evil. Millions of prayers have been said by all of us. Who could do such a thing? What do we tell our own children, who thankfully came home from school that Friday, about an act so cruel? Twenty minutes. That's the approximate time it took to rip 20 precious young lives and six of their teachers, including their principal, from this world. Moms lost babies and babies lost their moms. The hearts of 26 families have been thrust into a forever pain no one deserves.
NEWS
May 20, 2004
RE YOUR "Don't Blame Bush" front page: Kudos! I never buy your paper, but I did that day. Your bravery in publishing the column by Michael Smerconish is what we need more of. The time has come for all of our media to show some balance and halt the selling out of the USA. We all agree with open debate, but let's open the debate to both sides like you did with this cover story. Chris Prifte Shamong, N.J.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Despite Taliban gains and ISIS's emergence in Afghanistan, one amazing Kabul school continues to teach 4,000 students (half girls) to think independently and to believe in tolerance. The private Marefat school, along with its founder, Aziz Royesh, and several girl students, is the subject of Jeffrey Stern's moving new book, The Last Thousand: One School's Promise in a Nation at War . The book raises painful and very pertinent questions: Can liberal values take root in a conservative Muslim country that is threatened by Islamist radicals?
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Army narrative describes how Jeffrey F. Zauber, a Cherry Hill native, earned a Distinguished Service Cross for "exceptionally valorous actions" in South Vietnam on Feb. 2, 1969. "While serving as company medic during a mission to relieve a sister unit engaged with an enemy force," Mr. Zauber showed "extraordinary heroism," the June 25, 1969, account reads. "Approaching the combat area, Specialist Zauber's company came under intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrolman Michael Minor was driving solo. It was a slow, rainy morning. The radio was quiet. When the call came - a domestic disturbance on Old York Road - Minor, then a seven-year veteran assigned to the 35th District, jumped on it, even though another officer had originally been sent. He was just a few blocks away. And bored. Pulling up, he saw a man pacing on the porch. It was the father, he'd later find out. Walking up the steps, the front door of the house swung open, and a man stood in the doorway.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
COURAGE has always been a relative sort of thing. We consider it, reflected through both our personal prisms of perspective and the evolving context of time. These days, someone like Jason Collins, who announces his homosexuality to the sports world, is hailed as courageous, even though it's much more likely that a high-profile athlete who "comes out" will be heralded, not hounded. A Republican who supports gay marriage or a Democrat who declares herself to be pro-life are looked upon as heroic in some circles, and while they show a refreshing willingness to stray from the reservation, they're not exactly candidates for the Bronze Star.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
For the first time that night, it was quiet on the pile. The rescue dog wasn't barking. The excavator digging up debris from the building collapse at the Salvation Army thrift shop was turned off. Firefighters from the elite Rescue 1 unit, drained from eight hours of pulling bodies from the rubble, were off to the side, awaiting their replacements and drinking water. Amid the mess and ruin, Capt. John O'Neill, 50, a search-and-rescue specialist from Squad 72, stood by himself.
SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
REVIEW the tweeters and the commenters and you will realize just how unremarkable Jason Collins' declaration is. Collins will appear on the May 6 cover of Sports Illustrated , the subject of a first-person piece in which he announces his homosexuality. He presents himself as the first active male professional athlete to come out. Unless you are a severe hoops junkie, you probably do not know who Jason Collins is. Unless you are severely socially retarded, you probably do not care he is gay. For decades, the United States, home of a sports mania that has eclipsed all other forms of entertainment and information, has wondered what sort of social earthquake would erupt when a superjock acknowledged his sexual orientation was not hyper-hetero.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY KATHLEEN OROPEZA
WITHOUT QUESTION, the gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., committed evil. Millions of prayers have been said by all of us. Who could do such a thing? What do we tell our own children, who thankfully came home from school that Friday, about an act so cruel? Twenty minutes. That's the approximate time it took to rip 20 precious young lives and six of their teachers, including their principal, from this world. Moms lost babies and babies lost their moms. The hearts of 26 families have been thrust into a forever pain no one deserves.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
A look at some of those who died: Mary Sherlach, 56, school psychologist Maura Schwartz, of Deptford, Gloucester County, turned on the broadcast news Friday for information about the shooting. Then, the news broke: Her mother, Mary Sherlach, was among the victims. Schwartz had received a phone call from her sister, Sherlach's other daughter, frantically telling them that there was a shooting at the school. But it wasn't until news reports began confirming victim information that they learned of the death.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
George Lucas, the legendary director of the Star Wars saga, should have taken a few down-to-earth meetings with master storyteller Bertram Levy before he made Red Tails , the story of the African American pilots known today as the Tuskegee Airmen. Critics have not been kind to Lucas' World War II saga. They complain about the depth of the characters and the cliche-ridden dialogue. Most damning are the concerns that the movie doesn't delve deeply enough into the battles against segregation that the airmen had to wage just to help defend their country in wartime.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - At its heart, the Flight 93 National Memorial park is a battlefield - the place where 40 people lost their lives waging the first assault in the war on terror. But Sunday's 10th anniversary commemoration of 9/11 brought a spirit of hope that those who died there would be remembered not just for their bravery, but as an inspiration to future generations, speakers told the estimated 3,000 people gathered at the site. Capping an emotional memorial service was the arrival of President Obama, making his first visit to the crash location in the Laurel Highlands, 80 miles southeast of Pittsburgh.
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