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FOOD
June 24, 1987 | By NETTIE DUFFIELD, Special to the Daily News
Here's another way to use ground turkey: a turkey meatball salad with an Oriental flair. This will be a good addition to your summer menus. Keep the meatballs small - bite-size - and be sure to chill mixture for at least an hour before serving. The contrast between the soft meatballs and the crunchy lettuce, carrot and celery adds to the unique quality of the dish. ORIENTAL MEATBALL SALAD 1 beaten egg yolk 2 teaspoons fine dry bread crumbs 1/4 teaspoon onion salt 3/4 teaspoon grated fresh ginger, or 3/8 t ground ginger, divided 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 4 ounces ground raw turkey or ground pork 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1/4 cup tarragon vinegar 1/4 cup olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar or honey 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon, crumbled 10 fresh snow pea pods blanched one minute in boiling water or 1/2 6- ounce package frozen pea pods, thawed 1/4 cup diagonally sliced celery 1/4 cup grated carrot 1 tablespoon sliced scallions 3 leaves Boston lettuce, torn into small pieces In medium bowl, combine egg yolk, bread crumbs, onion salt, 1/4 teaspoon fresh ginger ( 1/8 teaspoon ground)
FOOD
September 11, 1996 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I love Italian food. My favorite is spaghetti and meatballs. My problem is, my meatballs are just OK, nothing to write home about. Can you supply me with a recipe for great homemade meatballs? Thanks. Jen Dembrowski Philadelphia Dear Jen, We asked Fortunato Minniti, chef and co-owner of Bella Mia Ristorante (at 9th and Catharine streets) for the secret to his light, tasty meatballs. He shared his mother Philamena's recipe, which she brought here from her native Naples.
FOOD
May 11, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Art book or cookbook? William Woys Weaver's "Pennsylvania Dutch Country Cooking" (Abbeville Press / $30) is so beautiful that you may be content to devour only the glorious color still-life photographs. Read it, and you will be seduced by the language as well: "This is a book about the cookery of the Pennsylvania Dutch and the nurturing earth that sustains it," Weaver, a food historian who lives in Devon, writes in the foreword. "Ours is a land of the thistle finch and saffron, of the mythical Elbedritsch and the Belschnickel, of the hex sign and powwow magic.
FOOD
October 16, 1994 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Baked pasta dishes have always been a comfort food for me; my favorite dish growing up was baked macaroni and cheese. It would probably occur to very few people that such food can also be simple, luscious and essentially lean - with the right ingredients. I learned to make baked pasta dishes at the hands of Nona, my Italian grandmother-in-law. Nona's signature dish was lasagna, a common baked pasta in America's culinary melting pot. Everything was made from scratch: homemade noodles, two sauces, vegetables and even cheeses.
FOOD
November 22, 1989 | By Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna, Special to The Inquirer
With the party season upon us, it pays to have a repertoire of knockout hors d'oeuvres that can be rustled up well in advance. And quickly. Nothing could be easier - or more elegant - than these two party pates, which microwave to perfection if you follow our directions exactly. One is compounded of beans, nuts, cheese and bread crumbs (vegetarians, take note), and the other is a silky spread buzzed up out of chicken livers. But first, a tip or two about microwaving chicken livers.
FOOD
January 7, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
If you're bored with beef, try "otherburgers. " What are otherburgers? Burgers made with other ground meat: lamb, veal or pork, for example. Or no meat at all. How about tunaburgers or turkeyburgers for a change. While ketchup is traditional on a beefburger, otherburgers call for other toppings and seasonings, more in keeping with their flavor. Fresh tomato or cucumber slices go great on tunaburgers. On turkeyburgers, too. Turkey also takes to fragrant herbs. Lamb and vealburgers are best seasoned with lemon, herbs or spices.
FOOD
January 3, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The virtue of clarified butter is that it can withstand higher cooking temperatures than unclarified butter. That means it will not burn as easily, making it a better medium for sauteing and browning foods. Another plus is that clarified butter keeps longer than regular butter. Though some cooks might miss the buttery flavor that's lost in the clarifying process, an interesting, subtle, nutty flavor takes its place. Clarified butter is made by simply melting butter slowly so that the milk solids sink to the bottom of the pan in the form of a residue.
FOOD
March 10, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
An efficient combination of microwave, stove-top and broiler cooking turns sausage links, tomatoes and zucchini into an attractive, 30-minute meal. Serve the stuffed zucchini on a bed of rice or couscous that cooks while you prepare this quick dish. Spicy Zucchini Boats Makes 4 main-dish servings 1 pound hot Italian-sausage links, casings removed (see note) 4 small zucchini (about 6 ounces each), trimmed and cut in half lengthwise 1/4 cup plain dried bread crumbs 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 ripe plum tomatoes (about 8 ounces)
FOOD
June 7, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you enjoy cooking from scratch, making your own condiments and preparing the standards of American cooking, then Home-Cooking Sampler: Family Favorites from A to Z (Prentice Hall, $19.95) is your type of cookbook. Peggy K. Glass presents an overview of those classic, everyday family meals, ranging from macaroni and cheese to Boston cream pie. With her guidance, making ketchups and graham crackers becomes more fun than chore. "Family food is the heart of home," writes the cooking school teacher, caterer and food writer.
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