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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2007
Is your belly built Simpson-tough? Try a few of these recipes created by local chefs who are also fans of the cartoon. Or - if you dare - sample recipes created by the characters themselves. First, Vesuvio chef Louis Mosca combines Homer's fave food groups: doughnuts and beer. Then - Mmmmmm! - breaded pork chops the way only Marge would make 'em, from Greg Salisbury of Rx restaurant. Finally, a simple, healthful salad that a local fan says Lisa would love. HOMER'S BEER-BATTERED DOUGHNUT HOLES 3 1/2 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 cup sugar 4 eggs 1 cup beer Vegetable oil for deep frying 1 cup sugar or confectioner's sugar In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt, spices and half-cup sugar until blended.
FOOD
March 10, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
An efficient combination of microwave, stove-top and broiler cooking turns sausage links, tomatoes and zucchini into an attractive, 30-minute meal. Serve the stuffed zucchini on a bed of rice or couscous that cooks while you prepare this quick dish. Spicy Zucchini Boats Makes 4 main-dish servings 1 pound hot Italian-sausage links, casings removed (see note) 4 small zucchini (about 6 ounces each), trimmed and cut in half lengthwise 1/4 cup plain dried bread crumbs 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 ripe plum tomatoes (about 8 ounces)
FOOD
January 8, 2004 | By Faye Levy FOR THE INQUIRER
Spoon sauce over a cooked vegetable. Sprinkle with a simple topping, brown in the oven, and you have a gratin. Even avowed veggie-haters enjoy their greens when enhanced this way. From Paris to Provence, gratins (GRAH-tins) have long played a role similar to our casseroles, and not just for vegetables. You can apply the gratin principle to pasta or protein foods or use it to create new dishes from leftovers. For an elegant dish that's easy and fairly fast, it's hard to beat this staple of French home cooking.
FOOD
November 7, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
While a Weiner schnitzel is often called a sausage, it is always, most definitely, a cutlet. In Philadelphia, Weiner schnitzel is available at Ludwig's Garten, at 1315 Sansom St., where authentic German and Austrian delights are prepared. To make the Schnitzel Sandwich, the pork or veal is pounded until tender, then fried up in clarified butter and white wine. Grab a beer and it's Oktoberfest anytime! LUDWIG'S GARTEN SCHNITZEL SANDWICH 6 oz. pork loin or veal top round 2 eggs, beaten 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup bread crumbs 2 oz. clarified butter 2 oz. white wine 1 wedge of lemon 3 slices of beefsteak tomato 2 leaves Romaine lettuce 2 slices bread of choice Pound the meat thin with mallet.
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eighty-two-year-old Laura Reutter isn't sure when she became the head cook for the annual frog dinner - an unusual culinary tradition to begin with. It was in the '70s, around the time Jennie Mancini passed away and back when the dinner in her mostly Italian neighborhood was for just 100 or so. Now she's in charge of four days of nonstop cooking for 950 people - all men. Reutter's the one who knows the unwritten recipe for the 450 pounds of spezzato. The one who knows how to prepare the thousands of frog legs just so. A boisterous great-grandmother, about 4-foot-6, she hobbles purposefully through the kitchen, ignoring her arthritis and bad back, dispensing instruction and laughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Mexico has the tastiest food carts and stands on the planet. Tacos, burritos, flautas and most of the other well-known Mexican dishes are actually street food south of the border. "In Mexico City, it's fast food," says Alfredo Aguilar, chef and owner of Las Cazuelas, 426 W. Girard Ave. (215-351-9144). On nearly every corner of the world's largest city is a stand selling tacos y tortas. "You normally get them for lunch. " In the United States, tacos are becoming as common as pizza.
SPORTS
September 14, 2000 | by Mike Kern , Daily News Sports Writer
Andy Bean. Jay Haas. Scott Hoch. Bob Gilder. Tom Purtzer. Mike Reid. D.A. Weibring. They have played a combined 171 years on the PGA Tour, with 46 victories. Each played in the last IVB Classic at Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in 1980. After two decades, the PGA Tour is back in the Philadelphia area, if only every other year. When the inaugural SEI Pennyslvania Classic tees off today at Paoli's Waynesborough Country Club, those seven are the lone links to another era. "God, there's that many?"
FOOD
February 5, 1997 | by Aliza Green, for the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I have a very primitive problem: I have trouble making meatballs. I mix them in a large bowl, with the usual ingredients: meat, sometimes egg, almost always bread crumbs, parsley, salt and pepper. I bake them about half an hour at 350 degrees. The problem comes when I cook them in the sauce. I really like to make sure the meatballs are well done, or I just can't eat them. What I usually do is to put them in the crock pot with one jar of sauce and a can of puree.
FOOD
September 11, 1996 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I love Italian food. My favorite is spaghetti and meatballs. My problem is, my meatballs are just OK, nothing to write home about. Can you supply me with a recipe for great homemade meatballs? Thanks. Jen Dembrowski Philadelphia Dear Jen, We asked Fortunato Minniti, chef and co-owner of Bella Mia Ristorante (at 9th and Catharine streets) for the secret to his light, tasty meatballs. He shared his mother Philamena's recipe, which she brought here from her native Naples.
FOOD
June 7, 1995 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
If cooking were just a matter of throwing food into the fire and waiting for it to get hot, there would be little to discuss. But the art of cooking is not just about heat. More often it's a question of protecting ingredients from the very flame that's meant to benefit them. One of the simplest ways to safeguard an ingredient is to cloak it in some protective coating before it hits the heat. Food coating can be as ephemeral as a film of marinade or as sturdy as the extra-crisp armor sported by fast-food fried chicken.
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