CollectionsBreakfast
IN THE NEWS

Breakfast

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most important meal of the day may be the perfect starting point for the beginning of a day trip, a one-week vacation, or the entire summer at the Jersey Shore. There are many who make it a ritual to grab their favorite breakfast grub before hitting the strand or checking in at the rental. And while dining out for breakfast certainly isn't unique to the Shore, the quest to return to a beloved spot for it summer after summer may be, according to Debbie Howarth, an associate professor of sales and marketing at Johnson and Wales University's School of Hospitality in Providence, R.I. Howarth, who grew up going "down the Shore," calls New Jersey "one of the greatest melting pots in the United States . . . where every culture has their ties to food and family.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joab Thomas, president of Pennsylvania State University, and James McCormick, Pennsylvania's chancellor of higher education, will discuss the need for a qualified workforce at the Eye-opener Breakfast of the Chester County Chamber of Business and Industry on April 28 at 7:44 a.m. at J&J Caterers in Exton. Madeleine Wing Adler, president of West Chester University, will moderate. The cost of the breakfast is $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers. For information, call 436-7696.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
A record number of business people attended this morning's kickoff breakfast for Phila-a-Job, the city's summer jobs program. The breakfast is held about this time every year to get the city's businesses to begin thinking about providing jobs or money to the program. This year, Phila-a-Job is hoping to raise $7.3 million in private and government funding to provide jobs for 22,500 people aged 14 to 21. The summer jobs program runs for six weeks, beginning the week of July 6. David Lacey, chief executive officer of the Private Industry Council, the organization that manages Phila-a-Job, said 150 business people representing 100 corporations attended the breakfast at Three Mellon Bank Center.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Ovaltine and Space Food Sticks, for example. The era that is ending - the Lou Mitchell era - hasn't necessarily been the golden age of the American breakfast. The last 66 years have brought us Pop Tarts, Count Chocula and Tang, and an alarming number of complete meals are housed entirely within soggy English muffins presented in foam coffins. Yet through it all, Lou Mitchell has prospered, for he has the desire and he has the touch. "We do a sweet business," says the 79-year-old restaurateur.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2014
PHILLY is increasingly known as a vegan-forward town, with places in most neighborhoods where you can enjoy an animal-free dinner or lunch. But what about breakfast? Recently, a friend staying in town overnight asked for a good weekday vegan breakfast spot, and I was stumped. Partly that's because I tend to be at my house at breakfast time, and partly it's because breakfast flies under the radar: You don't think about it that much until you really need it. I posed the question on the Web and got some great info from fellow vegans and "vegan-friendlies.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five months after a stolen bulldozer rammed into the front of the Piston Diner, crushing a fourth of the building, the restaurant reopened this week under new management and a new menu item: The bulldozer breakfast special. Police are still searching for the person who hot-wired the bulldozer at a nearby construction site March 6 and then rammed it into the building on Route 130 in Westville. But on Tuesday, patrons happily munched on the signature sandwich - a steak, egg, and cheese on a toasted torpedo bun - and exchanged hugs with the new owners, who formerly managed the now-closed Brooklawn Diner.
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In all of the excitement of planning for the Big Meal, it's easy to forget that there's a houseful of people - visiting relatives, home-from-college kids, and assorted other hangers-on - expecting to be fed on the days leading up to and after the holiday. Stocking the pantry and freezer with these guests in mind can avert those last-minute scrambles to get something on the table. One of the challenges of feeding family and friends during the holiday season is knowing how to walk the line between celebratory and indulgent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there   On her summer 2005 tour of the University of Pittsburgh, Caroline was impressed with the campus, obsessed with the gold-and-navy-blue-striped rugby shirts worn by the student guides called Pathfinders, and determined to become a Pathfinder herself. That fall, she was leaving her first Pathfinders meeting when one of the rowdy sophomores who had hooted and hollered as the new guides introduced themselves walked up to her. "Hi, I'm Alex," he said. Caroline, who grew up in Media, had graduated from the all-girls' Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
STOP THE WORLD You could call this group people who don't need people. It's the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement (VHEMT), pronounced "vehement," which favors the eventual phasing out of people, by unspecified methods. Fortune magazine reports that VHEMT acknowledges that the idea may give many people pause but says that "if you'll give the idea a chance . . . you might agree that the extinction of Homo sapiens would mean survival for millions if not billions of other earth-dwelling species.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Mary Beth Breckenridge, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
The housekeeper of the 1920s had it made. No longer did she need to polish her stove regularly with black graphite. Treatments with special cleansing oil were all that were needed to keep her modern stove rust-free. Her new refrigerator had a seamless lining, freeing her from the daily chore of scrubbing the icebox with boiling water so food wouldn't accumulate in the seams. Her linoleum floors needed only weekly waxing; her family's mattresses, just a weekly turning.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Jane M. Von Bergen and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
We can raise the bucks. That was the message Thursday from the region's political and business leaders as the Democratic National Committee's Technical Advisory Group wrapped up its two-day tour of Philadelphia. Local officials had pulled out all the stops for the 17-member group - from Mummers and cheesesteaks to swanky rooftop cocktail parties and a chance to (gently) tap the Liberty Bell. But perhaps the most important stop was a conference room on the 45th floor of the Comcast Center tower, where top local Democrats made their pitch for why the party's 2016 grand fete should be held in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the army of 18 Democratic National Committee representatives arrive in Philadelphia Wednesday, they will be greeted with plenty of Philadelphia swag and treated to a tour of the city's most treasured sites. As the 2016 Democratic National Convention site-selection committee arrived to a red carpet in New York City Monday, Philadelphia operatives were putting final touches to their plan to woo the committee later this week. Members of the selection committee will receive their own Sixers, Eagles, Phillies, and Union jerseys with their last names printed on the back, according to Kevin Washo, who is involved in the planning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there   On her summer 2005 tour of the University of Pittsburgh, Caroline was impressed with the campus, obsessed with the gold-and-navy-blue-striped rugby shirts worn by the student guides called Pathfinders, and determined to become a Pathfinder herself. That fall, she was leaving her first Pathfinders meeting when one of the rowdy sophomores who had hooted and hollered as the new guides introduced themselves walked up to her. "Hi, I'm Alex," he said. Caroline, who grew up in Media, had graduated from the all-girls' Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A statewide effort to get more students to eat breakfast is yielding surprisingly positive results. In a recent contest, Philadelphia's Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, a middle school, beat out 900 other Pennsylvania schools in the so-called School Breakfast Challenge. The school on East Courtland Street in North Philadelphia achieved the largest increase in breakfast participation in the state, improving from 29 percent of students in October 2013 to an average of 77 percent during January through March of this year.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The breakfast menu at the Oregon Diner on Friday was hard feelings, over easy as the vanquished Democratic candidates for governor met with winner Tom Wolf and party leaders in a unity ritual. U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz, state Treasurer Rob McCord, and Katie McGinty, the former state environmental secretary, and Wolf talked and noshed along with former Gov. Ed Rendell, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, and U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, chairman of the city party. No grand communiques emerged, just a reaffirmation that everybody wants to beat Republican Gov. Corbett this fall.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most important meal of the day may be the perfect starting point for the beginning of a day trip, a one-week vacation, or the entire summer at the Jersey Shore. There are many who make it a ritual to grab their favorite breakfast grub before hitting the strand or checking in at the rental. And while dining out for breakfast certainly isn't unique to the Shore, the quest to return to a beloved spot for it summer after summer may be, according to Debbie Howarth, an associate professor of sales and marketing at Johnson and Wales University's School of Hospitality in Providence, R.I. Howarth, who grew up going "down the Shore," calls New Jersey "one of the greatest melting pots in the United States . . . where every culture has their ties to food and family.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2014
PHILLY is increasingly known as a vegan-forward town, with places in most neighborhoods where you can enjoy an animal-free dinner or lunch. But what about breakfast? Recently, a friend staying in town overnight asked for a good weekday vegan breakfast spot, and I was stumped. Partly that's because I tend to be at my house at breakfast time, and partly it's because breakfast flies under the radar: You don't think about it that much until you really need it. I posed the question on the Web and got some great info from fellow vegans and "vegan-friendlies.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON New Jersey legislators are pushing to expand access to school breakfast programs in an effort to stem hunger and improve focus in the classroom among the state's youth. An Assembly panel advanced legislation Monday that would require more public schools to offer breakfast. Another bill would encourage school districts and nonpublic schools to serve breakfast in first-period class. The legislative effort comes as more students have become eligible for school breakfast programs, and low-income families have lost assistance from the federal government because of a reduction in food stamp funding.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey has shown marked increases in getting low-income children to eat breakfast in school, while Pennsylvania has demonstrated slow improvement in serving the meals. That's the word from the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), which released its School Breakfast Scorecard this month. Based in Washington, FRAC is the leading antihunger advocacy group in America. Throughout the country, school-breakfast participation by low-income students is calculated by measuring the number of children eating breakfast compared with those eating lunch.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
* Stuff yourself with pancakes, sausage and maple syrup, then head out into the crisp winter woods to see how maple syrup is made at Tyler Arboretum's annual Pancake Breakfast and Maple Sugaring Celebration, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 22 (515 Painter Rd., Media, 610-566-9134, ext. 208, TylerArboretum.org ). Hot cocoa and coffee also fuel this journey through the 650-acre arboretum. $12 adults, $6 ages 3-12 and free under 3. Snow date is March 1. * Beck's Kitchen Pantry condiments and spices are now available at Whole Foods Markets in the 'burbs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|