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NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO - Breast-cancer experts are cheering what could be some of the biggest advances in more than a decade: two new medicines that significantly delay the time until women with very advanced cases get worse. In a large international study, an experimental drug from Genentech called pertuzumab held cancer at bay for a median of 18 months when given with standard treatment, versus 12 months for others given only the usual treatment. It also strongly appears to be improving survival, and follow-up is continuing to see if it does.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By SUSAN M. LOVE
THIS HAS been a bad year for proponents of early detection of breast cancer. Not only have we seen debates about the effectiveness of mammography, but a study just published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that breast self-examination did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. Once again women find themselves wondering what happened. For years, we've been told that early detection is the only way to ensure that you will find breast cancer at a curable stage.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Linda Kerns was 4 years old when she saw her mother die. One year later, her aunt died. When she was 34, she watched in agony as her sister died. All had breast cancer. None made it out of their 30s. Last year, at 35, she was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. With a malignant tumor the size of a baseball in one breast and the cancer already spread to nine nearby lymph nodes, she made a desperate choice: to subject her body to a near-lethal onetime dose of chemotherapy followed by a bone-marrow transplant to repair her chemically ravaged immune system.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY-FEEDING WARNING Parents, don't give babies soy-based beverages other than infant formulas as their only source of nutrition. So warns the Food and Drug Administration, which says soy-based drinks, sometimes called "soy milk," do not have the nutrients infants need. The warning stems from the case of a 5-month-old baby girl, now in critical condition, fed almost since birth on a soy beverage bought in a health food store. FLU TOLL If you've suffered through it, you won't be surprised to learn that the 1989-90 flu season could turn out to be the worst in five years.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011
Cancer is a scary prospect, and we need all the help we can get to understand what it is, how it's treated, and how to cope with it. Some iPad tablet applications have risen to the task, or parts of it. A guide to 120 types of cancer is part of Cancer.net Mobile , from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. This free app has information about treatment, costs, and side effects, and helps patients and families manage life with cancer. Unfortunately, links to a video and podcast of "When the Doctor Says Cancer" were not working when we tested the app. Tools in the app let you log symptoms and side effects and note the questions that you need to take to the doctor's office, when you could be nervous and forget.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camille Quattrone Ridarelli, 60, of Penn Valley, wife of former teen idol Bobby Rydell, her high school sweetheart, died Monday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. She and Roberto Ridarelli - Bobby Rydell was a stage name - grew up blocks from each other in South Philadelphia. In an interview several years ago, she said that when she was a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, "I used to see him on the trolley car when he went to [the old] Bishop Neumann, and wait for him, but he never gave me a second look.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff and wire services contributed to this report
The next time you click on TV and hear talk-show host Montel Williams looking deep into the eyes of a breast cancer patient and saying he sympathizes, check your cynicism. Williams had a double mastectomy 23 years ago when he was a Marine. He told attendees at a breast cancer research funding gala in New York last Saturday that doctors found a lump in his chest, operated and then discovered it was benign, according to the New York Post. Although he still has his nipples, "there was moderate scarring" that has faded.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1984, a retired Columbia University surgeon published a paper about his 47 years of experience with the "Halsted radical mastectomy," which involved removing a woman's cancerous breast, chest muscles, underarm lymph nodes, and sometimes part of her chest wall. It was a disfiguring and debilitating operation and, as the surgeon, Cushman D. Haagensen, stated, for the many women found to have advanced disease, it was futile. Even so, he considered it the best available treatment and was dismayed that it was being abandoned in favor of more conservative surgery combined with radiation and chemotherapy.
NEWS
September 9, 2008
I APPLAUD the controller's effort to raise money for breast cancer by encouraging employees in his office to wear blue jeans on Oct. 3 as part of a national denim day. Relaxing an office dress code is an opportunity for employees to reflect on a disease that strikes the women we hold dear - our wives, mothers, sisters and daughters. Jack Zoltowski, Philadelphia
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2016
At the Convention Centers Conventions expecting 500 or more to attend.    Date Attendance     Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention1     Aug. 15-18   3,000    American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition3     Aug. 21-24   15,000    Your Wedding Experience Presented by David Tutera1     Aug. 28   1,000    American Political Science Association 2     Sept. 1-4   6,500    ACN/GE Planning Event 20163     Sept.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Soon after Pennsylvania's breast density notification law took effect in 2014, Jules Sumkin found himself wanting to spare women from getting a letter that might alarm or perplex them. Twenty-eight states, including New Jersey and Delaware, now have laws that require mammography centers to inform women with dense breast tissue that it may increase the risk of cancer and obscure a malignancy on a mammogram, so they may want to talk to their doctors about extra imaging options. The letters don't mention quandaries that Sumkin, chair of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, knows too well: There are no guidelines for extra imaging, or any evidence that it saves lives.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
The lady was a tramp. That was part of her charm. Scarred, a tad surly. An alpha female if there ever was one. Duchess was her name. Liz Hardt, a softie for a tough dog, was smitten. "I fell in love with her immediately," said Hardt, a veterinary nurse. "She was a big, bad dog. " But there was something else. A kind of bond. Hardt was a cancer survivor. Duchess was, too. The pair met through a program that gives new meaning to the saying, "Who rescued whom?" Through the Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program, breast tumors are removed from homeless dogs that would otherwise go untreated and quite likely die. The dogs are then put up for adoption.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Doherty battles cancer Shannen Doherty is sharing her battle with breast cancer. The Beverly Hills, 90210 star has posted pics on Instagram that show her cutting her shoulder-length hair, then shaving her head. (Chemotherapy causes heavy hair loss.) Doherty, 45, tells the The Dr. Oz Show that if necessary, she has no qualms about undergoing a mastectomy. "Ultimately, they're just breasts, right?" she says. "I mean, I love them. . . . But in the grand scheme of things, I would rather be alive, and I would rather grow old with my husband.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A Boston-area start-up that is developing medicines for women's health, cancer, and endocrine diseases has opened a commercial and medical affairs office in Wayne to gear up for the potential launch of a new osteoporosis medicine. Radius Health Inc. has a lead drug candidate, abaloparatide, that had positive results in a patient study to reduce the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women with bone-depleting osteoporosis. The treatment, in a class of agents called anabolics that build bone rather than slow bone loss, is being reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
ISSUE | BREAST CANCER Stepping up to fight a deadly disease Thank you to the more than 2,000 people who came out last Sunday morning for the 15th annual Living Beyond Breast Cancer Reach and Raise yoga fund-raising event on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Together, 139 teams raised $373,617 to support women and men affected by breast cancer with a trusted source of information and a community of support. This event began as a dream, with a small yoga class of about a hundred people, and it has grown to be one of the city's most spectacular and powerful events.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | Gab Bonghi, Staff Writer
Death is essential for Pinkwash, the West Philly punk outfit. In 2009, vocalist and guitarist Joey Doubek lost his mother to cancer; years later, he's still dealing with grief in the form of music. On Friday, Pinkwash , which has received accolades from Pitchfork , NPR , and the Washington Post , will release its first full-length LP, Collective Sigh . It's the culmination of many things: Loss, self-reflection, and doubt. Doubek and drummer Ashley Arnwine first met in the Washington DIY music scene, where they collaborated in bands such as Mass Movement of the Moth and Ingrid . After a few years, Ingrid ended, and they went their separate ways.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
As sleety rain kept falling, the activists anguished about whether to go ahead with plans to lie on the ground on a recent Saturday evening. Their "die-in" was intended to symbolize the fact that, despite all the progress in taming breast cancer, it still takes about 40,000 lives a year in the United States. Imagine wiping out the population of Wilkes-Barre or Atlantic City. Every year. For three decades. Still, the demonstrators had to be pragmatic. Most members of their new group, MET-UP, had metastatic breast cancer and had to be careful to protect their fragile health.
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