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Breast Cancer

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NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO - Breast-cancer experts are cheering what could be some of the biggest advances in more than a decade: two new medicines that significantly delay the time until women with very advanced cases get worse. In a large international study, an experimental drug from Genentech called pertuzumab held cancer at bay for a median of 18 months when given with standard treatment, versus 12 months for others given only the usual treatment. It also strongly appears to be improving survival, and follow-up is continuing to see if it does.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By SUSAN M. LOVE
THIS HAS been a bad year for proponents of early detection of breast cancer. Not only have we seen debates about the effectiveness of mammography, but a study just published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that breast self-examination did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. Once again women find themselves wondering what happened. For years, we've been told that early detection is the only way to ensure that you will find breast cancer at a curable stage.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Linda Kerns was 4 years old when she saw her mother die. One year later, her aunt died. When she was 34, she watched in agony as her sister died. All had breast cancer. None made it out of their 30s. Last year, at 35, she was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. With a malignant tumor the size of a baseball in one breast and the cancer already spread to nine nearby lymph nodes, she made a desperate choice: to subject her body to a near-lethal onetime dose of chemotherapy followed by a bone-marrow transplant to repair her chemically ravaged immune system.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY-FEEDING WARNING Parents, don't give babies soy-based beverages other than infant formulas as their only source of nutrition. So warns the Food and Drug Administration, which says soy-based drinks, sometimes called "soy milk," do not have the nutrients infants need. The warning stems from the case of a 5-month-old baby girl, now in critical condition, fed almost since birth on a soy beverage bought in a health food store. FLU TOLL If you've suffered through it, you won't be surprised to learn that the 1989-90 flu season could turn out to be the worst in five years.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011
Cancer is a scary prospect, and we need all the help we can get to understand what it is, how it's treated, and how to cope with it. Some iPad tablet applications have risen to the task, or parts of it. A guide to 120 types of cancer is part of Cancer.net Mobile , from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. This free app has information about treatment, costs, and side effects, and helps patients and families manage life with cancer. Unfortunately, links to a video and podcast of "When the Doctor Says Cancer" were not working when we tested the app. Tools in the app let you log symptoms and side effects and note the questions that you need to take to the doctor's office, when you could be nervous and forget.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camille Quattrone Ridarelli, 60, of Penn Valley, wife of former teen idol Bobby Rydell, her high school sweetheart, died Monday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. She and Roberto Ridarelli - Bobby Rydell was a stage name - grew up blocks from each other in South Philadelphia. In an interview several years ago, she said that when she was a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, "I used to see him on the trolley car when he went to [the old] Bishop Neumann, and wait for him, but he never gave me a second look.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff and wire services contributed to this report
The next time you click on TV and hear talk-show host Montel Williams looking deep into the eyes of a breast cancer patient and saying he sympathizes, check your cynicism. Williams had a double mastectomy 23 years ago when he was a Marine. He told attendees at a breast cancer research funding gala in New York last Saturday that doctors found a lump in his chest, operated and then discovered it was benign, according to the New York Post. Although he still has his nipples, "there was moderate scarring" that has faded.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1984, a retired Columbia University surgeon published a paper about his 47 years of experience with the "Halsted radical mastectomy," which involved removing a woman's cancerous breast, chest muscles, underarm lymph nodes, and sometimes part of her chest wall. It was a disfiguring and debilitating operation and, as the surgeon, Cushman D. Haagensen, stated, for the many women found to have advanced disease, it was futile. Even so, he considered it the best available treatment and was dismayed that it was being abandoned in favor of more conservative surgery combined with radiation and chemotherapy.
NEWS
September 9, 2008
I APPLAUD the controller's effort to raise money for breast cancer by encouraging employees in his office to wear blue jeans on Oct. 3 as part of a national denim day. Relaxing an office dress code is an opportunity for employees to reflect on a disease that strikes the women we hold dear - our wives, mothers, sisters and daughters. Jack Zoltowski, Philadelphia
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there They met at a now-defunct bar during Philadelphia's May 2012 Outfest. Cara couldn't believe how loud Val was. Why did she have to be the center of attention? "I thought she was a jerk. " Val chalked up Cara's quietness to a holier-than-thou attitude. "I thought she was stuck-up and pretentious. " Then that August, the same mutual friend that introduced them - Holly - invited a bunch of people to PBR Bar & Grill at Xfinity Live, where another friend's band was performing.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
HERSHEY, Pa. - After a celebratory hug with coach Carl Arrigale, Ja'Quan Newton took a seat on the bench and broke down. "I didn't really feel it until then," the Neumann-Goretti senior said. "When I came out of the game, it really hit me. " Friday night, a day after his mother died after an extended battle with breast cancer, Newton put on an unforgettable and inspired performance to lead the Saints to their fourth PIAA Class AAA boys' basketball championship in five seasons. The 6-foot-3 guard and Miami signee produced a game-high 33 points, including five three-pointers, to lift Neumann-Goretti to a 64-57 overtime triumph against District 3's Susquehanna Township at the Giant Center.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
T IFFANY WADE, 29, of Cheltenham Township, is CEO of Kissess LLC, a company that makes "F--- CANCER" apparel, with the "C" in "F---" replaced by a breast-cancer-awareness ribbon. Wade, a divorced mother of two daughters and a registered nurse, started the apparel line a year ago, shortly before her hairstylist's mother died of breast cancer. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the company? A: I've been an RN for 10 years and worked at Hahnemann [University Hospital]
NEWS
February 21, 2014
DOCTORS tell many American women that they need a yearly mammogram to screen for breast cancer. Early detection saves lives, women are told. But evidence has been mounting for years that mammograms do not reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer. Last week, the British Medical Journal released a blockbuster, long-term study of nearly 90,000 Canadian women. It concluded that yearly mammography screenings for women 40 to 59 do not reduce breast cancer deaths, though they make a diagnosis of breast cancer more likely.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
DOWNINGTOWN A Pennsylvania appeals court on Friday vacated the $1 million bail set for former Chester County District Judge Rita Arnold. Judge John Braxton had defended his decision to hike Arnold's bail in an opinion filed last week, saying it was not excessive despite being 10 times what he imposed earlier in her case. An unnamed Superior Court judge disagreed and reduced Arnold's bail to the $100,000 she posted in October. The decision will allow Arnold, convicted of concealing a citation filed against her son, to remain free while she appeals the sentence of 16 to 32 months imposed by Braxton.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER Former District Judge Rita Arnold has been ordered back to prison by a judge who declined to reconsider her sentence in light of her ongoing treatments for breast cancer. Arnold, who pleaded guilty in June to concealing a citation filed against her son, hung her head Tuesday as the judge ordered her to finish serving out the 16- to 32-month prison sentence he imposed in October. Behind her, more than 25 friends and family members who packed the Chester County courtroom erupted in sobs and screams.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Demi goes for respectability It's time we respected youngster Demi Lovato , 21, as a serious artist and a woman of conscience. "I think no matter what way you say it, you're gonna be in the public eye and people are gonna look up to you. I just decided that I turned 21, I gotta be an adult, I've gotta act like one and here I am," Demi tells Hollyscoop. And she tells Entertainment Weekly she's tired of singers who write songs just for their shock value. "You're more respected as an artist" if you stay away from that material, she says.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbra Watson Riley, 45, the daughter of Bernard C. Watson, a prominent educator and civic leader in Philadelphia, died of breast cancer Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Mayo Clinic and Hospice in Phoenix. She lived in Paradise Valley, Ariz. A Philadelphia native, Mrs. Riley attended John Story Jenks and Julia R. Masterman Schools before graduating from Germantown Friends School, where she played on the tennis team. Her father is chairman of the board of trustees of the Barnes Foundation.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge who sentenced former Magisterial District Judge Rita Arnold to 16 to 32 months in prison for concealing a citation filed against her son has agreed to weigh at a hearing next month whether the punishment was appropriate. Arnold was sentenced by Senior Judge John Braxton on Oct. 15. Her attorney, Heidi Eakin, had requested house arrest in part because Arnold is undergoing treatment for a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. "This sentence was way over the top of the guidelines," Eakin said.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Great news: Pennsylvania recently passed a law to improve women's health. Alas, it is based on faulty science and lacks funding. On Friday, right after the pink-ribboned month of October, Gov. Corbett signed into law the Breast Density Notification Act. The law requires mammography centers to notify women about breast density so they might consider further tests such as ultrasounds and MRIs. Denser breasts appear white in mammograms, as do tumors, making them more difficult to read.
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