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Breast Cancer

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NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO - Breast-cancer experts are cheering what could be some of the biggest advances in more than a decade: two new medicines that significantly delay the time until women with very advanced cases get worse. In a large international study, an experimental drug from Genentech called pertuzumab held cancer at bay for a median of 18 months when given with standard treatment, versus 12 months for others given only the usual treatment. It also strongly appears to be improving survival, and follow-up is continuing to see if it does.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By SUSAN M. LOVE
THIS HAS been a bad year for proponents of early detection of breast cancer. Not only have we seen debates about the effectiveness of mammography, but a study just published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that breast self-examination did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. Once again women find themselves wondering what happened. For years, we've been told that early detection is the only way to ensure that you will find breast cancer at a curable stage.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Linda Kerns was 4 years old when she saw her mother die. One year later, her aunt died. When she was 34, she watched in agony as her sister died. All had breast cancer. None made it out of their 30s. Last year, at 35, she was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. With a malignant tumor the size of a baseball in one breast and the cancer already spread to nine nearby lymph nodes, she made a desperate choice: to subject her body to a near-lethal onetime dose of chemotherapy followed by a bone-marrow transplant to repair her chemically ravaged immune system.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY-FEEDING WARNING Parents, don't give babies soy-based beverages other than infant formulas as their only source of nutrition. So warns the Food and Drug Administration, which says soy-based drinks, sometimes called "soy milk," do not have the nutrients infants need. The warning stems from the case of a 5-month-old baby girl, now in critical condition, fed almost since birth on a soy beverage bought in a health food store. FLU TOLL If you've suffered through it, you won't be surprised to learn that the 1989-90 flu season could turn out to be the worst in five years.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011
Cancer is a scary prospect, and we need all the help we can get to understand what it is, how it's treated, and how to cope with it. Some iPad tablet applications have risen to the task, or parts of it. A guide to 120 types of cancer is part of Cancer.net Mobile , from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. This free app has information about treatment, costs, and side effects, and helps patients and families manage life with cancer. Unfortunately, links to a video and podcast of "When the Doctor Says Cancer" were not working when we tested the app. Tools in the app let you log symptoms and side effects and note the questions that you need to take to the doctor's office, when you could be nervous and forget.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camille Quattrone Ridarelli, 60, of Penn Valley, wife of former teen idol Bobby Rydell, her high school sweetheart, died Monday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. She and Roberto Ridarelli - Bobby Rydell was a stage name - grew up blocks from each other in South Philadelphia. In an interview several years ago, she said that when she was a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, "I used to see him on the trolley car when he went to [the old] Bishop Neumann, and wait for him, but he never gave me a second look.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff and wire services contributed to this report
The next time you click on TV and hear talk-show host Montel Williams looking deep into the eyes of a breast cancer patient and saying he sympathizes, check your cynicism. Williams had a double mastectomy 23 years ago when he was a Marine. He told attendees at a breast cancer research funding gala in New York last Saturday that doctors found a lump in his chest, operated and then discovered it was benign, according to the New York Post. Although he still has his nipples, "there was moderate scarring" that has faded.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1984, a retired Columbia University surgeon published a paper about his 47 years of experience with the "Halsted radical mastectomy," which involved removing a woman's cancerous breast, chest muscles, underarm lymph nodes, and sometimes part of her chest wall. It was a disfiguring and debilitating operation and, as the surgeon, Cushman D. Haagensen, stated, for the many women found to have advanced disease, it was futile. Even so, he considered it the best available treatment and was dismayed that it was being abandoned in favor of more conservative surgery combined with radiation and chemotherapy.
NEWS
September 9, 2008
I APPLAUD the controller's effort to raise money for breast cancer by encouraging employees in his office to wear blue jeans on Oct. 3 as part of a national denim day. Relaxing an office dress code is an opportunity for employees to reflect on a disease that strikes the women we hold dear - our wives, mothers, sisters and daughters. Jack Zoltowski, Philadelphia
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NEWS
April 16, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Providing options Thanks for tackling the difficult and delicate subject of women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy ("When pregnancy and cancer collide," Sunday). Dr. Elyce Cardonick's pregnancy registry helps women and their doctors understand how first-class cancer treatment and pregnancy care can be given at the same time. Breast cancer is the cancer most commonly diagnosed during pregnancy. We at Living Beyond Breast Cancer are working with Cardonick on a publication that will provide treatment options and resources.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | Catherine Ormerod
This week, 26 people with metastatic breast cancer - the kind of cancer that cannot yet be cured - will come together in Philadelphia. The group, an eclectic one that shares a common purpose, includes 25 women and a man with breast cancer. He is a retired Air Force colonel, one of a few thousand men who each year receive this surprising diagnosis. "I want to be involved in a more direct conversation about cancer," he said. Selected from 161 applicants, they are the second class of the "Hear My Voice" outreach volunteer program, which takes place at Living Beyond Breast Cancer's annual Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: In 2004, my husband and I were contacted by a friend who had gotten into an abusive relationship and lost custody of her daughter. She asked us to go through social services and adopt her little girl, so at least she would know her baby was loved and well taken care of. Long story short, we did everything we could, but in the end, we lost our battle. The grandparents were involved and took over. It was heartbreaking after a year and a half of loving the girl to have to let her go. My niece works at an ice cream shop and saw our precious one recently.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Helen Felsenthal, 81, of Merion, an educator and two-time breast cancer survivor honored for her volunteer work with other mastectomy patients, died Friday, March 4, of Alzheimer's disease at her second home in Bradley Beach, N.J. A resident of Philadelphia since 1973, Dr. Felsenthal taught at every level - from elementary school to graduate education at the University of Pennsylvania, said her husband, Norman. Born and reared in Pittsburgh, she was the seventh of eight children and the only one to pursue higher education.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Rita Wilson is grateful Actor and recently minted songwriter Rita Wilson knew exactly what topic she would tackle if she could write her own songs. "It has to do with being grateful," Wilson once told singer-songwriter (and former American Idol judge) Kara DioGuardi , whom she befriended after learning they had both played Roxie Hart in the Broadway revival of Chicago . "I was in awe of her talent," Wilson, 59, tells USA Today. She says DioGuardi encouraged her to write.
SPORTS
March 7, 2016
Former Phillie Ken Giles gave up two runs in one inning in his debut with the Houston Astros, who lost, 3-1, to the New York Mets on Saturday. Giles is expected to take over the closer role after he was acquired in an offseason trade with the Phillies. The righthander went 6-3 with 15 saves and a 1.80 ERA in 69 games with the Phillies last year. Houston had a 1-0 lead when Giles took the mound for the fifth inning. Eric Campbell doubled and Dilson Herrera had a run-scoring triple on Giles' first two pitches.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
After a brain aneurysm paralyzed her body and silenced her voice, a 14-year-old Gloucester County farm girl named Theresa imagined herself screaming. I'm here . It's me. I'm still the old Theresa . "I had no way of communicating," Theresa Gattuso O'Connor writes in her uplifting memoir, A Whisper From Within: My Life, My Terms . It became available in September on online book sites. And the self-published author, 44, has plenty to say on the page and in person.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
More women with breast cancer - and an increasing number without - are choosing to have mastectomies over more breast-sparing procedures. And nearly half go home the same day, new federal statistics show. Data from 13 states representing one quarter of the U.S. population found the rate of mastectomy increased 36 percent from 2005 to 2013, while overall breast cancer incidence was unchanged. And 45 percent of mastectomies in 2013 were in hospital-affiliated outpatient surgery centers with no overnight stay, up 22 percent in a decade.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Super shopping, sensational skirts, sumptuous treats, and supportive friends all awaited the 60-plus attendees at a fund-raiser at Skirt in Bryn Mawr on Nov. 18. The event was held to raise funds and show support for the Living Beyond Breast Cancer organization. The $3,000 raised will be used to provide those in need with breast-cancer information and education through conferences, community meetings, online webinars, a toll-free help line, printed publications and newsletters, and a comprehensive website.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Excessive delays in breast cancer treatment may compromise patients' survival, according to two major studies published Thursday in JAMA Oncology. What's more, the women most likely to experience long delays were black or Hispanic, and one analysis found a correlation with lower incomes. One study, led by Fox Chase Cancer Center surgical oncologist Richard J. Bleicher, used patient information from two large federal databases to examine the impact on survival of delays in surgery for breast cancer that had not spread to distant organs.
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