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Breast Cancer

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NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO - Breast-cancer experts are cheering what could be some of the biggest advances in more than a decade: two new medicines that significantly delay the time until women with very advanced cases get worse. In a large international study, an experimental drug from Genentech called pertuzumab held cancer at bay for a median of 18 months when given with standard treatment, versus 12 months for others given only the usual treatment. It also strongly appears to be improving survival, and follow-up is continuing to see if it does.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By SUSAN M. LOVE
THIS HAS been a bad year for proponents of early detection of breast cancer. Not only have we seen debates about the effectiveness of mammography, but a study just published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that breast self-examination did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. Once again women find themselves wondering what happened. For years, we've been told that early detection is the only way to ensure that you will find breast cancer at a curable stage.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Linda Kerns was 4 years old when she saw her mother die. One year later, her aunt died. When she was 34, she watched in agony as her sister died. All had breast cancer. None made it out of their 30s. Last year, at 35, she was diagnosed with the dreaded disease. With a malignant tumor the size of a baseball in one breast and the cancer already spread to nine nearby lymph nodes, she made a desperate choice: to subject her body to a near-lethal onetime dose of chemotherapy followed by a bone-marrow transplant to repair her chemically ravaged immune system.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY-FEEDING WARNING Parents, don't give babies soy-based beverages other than infant formulas as their only source of nutrition. So warns the Food and Drug Administration, which says soy-based drinks, sometimes called "soy milk," do not have the nutrients infants need. The warning stems from the case of a 5-month-old baby girl, now in critical condition, fed almost since birth on a soy beverage bought in a health food store. FLU TOLL If you've suffered through it, you won't be surprised to learn that the 1989-90 flu season could turn out to be the worst in five years.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011
Cancer is a scary prospect, and we need all the help we can get to understand what it is, how it's treated, and how to cope with it. Some iPad tablet applications have risen to the task, or parts of it. A guide to 120 types of cancer is part of Cancer.net Mobile , from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. This free app has information about treatment, costs, and side effects, and helps patients and families manage life with cancer. Unfortunately, links to a video and podcast of "When the Doctor Says Cancer" were not working when we tested the app. Tools in the app let you log symptoms and side effects and note the questions that you need to take to the doctor's office, when you could be nervous and forget.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camille Quattrone Ridarelli, 60, of Penn Valley, wife of former teen idol Bobby Rydell, her high school sweetheart, died Monday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. She and Roberto Ridarelli - Bobby Rydell was a stage name - grew up blocks from each other in South Philadelphia. In an interview several years ago, she said that when she was a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, "I used to see him on the trolley car when he went to [the old] Bishop Neumann, and wait for him, but he never gave me a second look.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff and wire services contributed to this report
The next time you click on TV and hear talk-show host Montel Williams looking deep into the eyes of a breast cancer patient and saying he sympathizes, check your cynicism. Williams had a double mastectomy 23 years ago when he was a Marine. He told attendees at a breast cancer research funding gala in New York last Saturday that doctors found a lump in his chest, operated and then discovered it was benign, according to the New York Post. Although he still has his nipples, "there was moderate scarring" that has faded.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1984, a retired Columbia University surgeon published a paper about his 47 years of experience with the "Halsted radical mastectomy," which involved removing a woman's cancerous breast, chest muscles, underarm lymph nodes, and sometimes part of her chest wall. It was a disfiguring and debilitating operation and, as the surgeon, Cushman D. Haagensen, stated, for the many women found to have advanced disease, it was futile. Even so, he considered it the best available treatment and was dismayed that it was being abandoned in favor of more conservative surgery combined with radiation and chemotherapy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More and more women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are opting to remove both, even when they know the radical surgery is unlikely to prolong their lives. In an era of concern about rising health-care costs - and decades after breast-conserving lumpectomy with radiation was shown to be effective - experts find the double-mastectomy trend puzzling and disturbing. But it makes sense to women like Robyn Freeman of Haverford. An ultra-fit yoga teacher, she insisted on a double mastectomy after she felt a breast lump that turned out to be early-stage cancer in March.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
FALL APPEARS to have arrived, finally. The thought of hot apple cider, Halloween and haunted houses makes Temporary Tattle quite happy. There is some sadness, however: TT's editor for nearly a year marked his last day with the Daily News yesterday for an opportunity that can't be missed. So, we wish him the best and hope Albert Stumm (yeah, you're bold-faced alright) enjoys his last ride on the bullet train to Celebrityville. We hope you do, too. Woo-hoo! Yesterday Humanitarian slash actress Angelina Jolie is now a dame.
SPORTS
October 13, 2014 | By Avery Maehrer, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a rainy afternoon, the color pink brightened the field. At Upper Dublin on Saturday, the Cardinals and players from visiting Methacton wore pink shirts, socks, and headbands in recognition of the sixth annual Corners for Cancer event. Even the field hockey balls were pink, as the Warriors defeated Upper Dublin, 3-0, in a nonleague game. Methacton jumped out to a 1-0 lead less than six minutes into the first half, with freshman forward Olivia Hoover firing the ball into the net off an assist from Julia Dickinson.
SPORTS
October 7, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WITH THE SUN consistently playing peek-a-boo behind the ash-colored clouds hovering above George Washington High's football field, Mary Jane Gilbert literally followed intently as Bonner-Prendergast marched toward last-second glory. Clad in a gray sweatshirt and pink bandana, Gilbert, who was between chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer, did her best to contend with the resulting change in temperatures. But, absolutely nothing would obscure her view. After all, her son, Joe Oquendo, was on that field.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For the eight years since her diagnosis in 2006, drugs, surgery, and chemotherapy had kept Debra Hinkle's breast cancer at bay. But now, the conventional treatments were failing, and the disease was spreading. So when her oncologist decided it was time for the Bucks County woman to consider relatively untested therapies, she was more than willing. "I thought that if I didn't do a clinical trial now, maybe I wouldn't be able to later," said Hinkle, 54, who lives in Newtown Township and works as a software-development project manager.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago, after successful treatment for breast cancer, anxiety became Susan Chase's constant companion. She was unable to sleep, and the unsettled feeling that "the sky was going to fall on me" plagued her daily life. "After all the treatments were done, it felt really horrifying," she says. "I was depressed, fragile, and hypervigilant. " The Mount Airy performer, dancer, and creative arts therapist consulted psychologists and tried a variety of anti-anxiety medications.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women whose breast tumors have spread to the skin are automatically diagnosed as stage III - advanced cancer with a relatively poor prognosis. But a new analysis by Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that classification approach is outdated and often unduly grim. The size of the tumor and whether it has spread to underarm lymph nodes are far more important predictors of survival than skin involvement, according to the study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. "Many women with tumors that happen to have spread to the skin may, unfortunately, be given an inaccurately dire prognosis - along with, perhaps, some unnecessary treatment," said study leader Richard J. Bleicher, a surgical oncologist at Fox Chase in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
No kids for Cam No ticking biological clock keeps Cameron Diaz awake at night. Glam Cam, a robust 41 (almost 42), tells Esquire (whose August cover she adorns) that motherhood holds no allure. "It's so much more work to have children," she tells the "Man at His Best" mag. "To have lives besides your own that you are responsible for - I didn't take that on. . . . A baby - that's all day, every day for 18 years. Not having a baby might really make things easier, but that doesn't make it an easy decision.
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