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Breast Cancer

ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Debra Copit, Generosa Grana, and Marisa Weiss have much in common: all mothers, all Main Line residents, all doctors - all breast cancer specialists. And they all have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Their similar stories are both coincidence and cautionary tale - illustrations of breast cancer's indiscriminate nature but also its complexity, storming into the lives of patients with individual and unique markers. Yet at least in one way, cancer has imparted a shared lesson to these women, all of whom are now in excellent health: Getting a diagnosis will change your life.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
The people who wanted to call attention to the hopes and tragedies of breast cancer needed a big billboard for their message - the biggest they could find. Hey, how about the skyline itself? Sure. Get the city, the Port Authority, business firms to light the exteriors of their buildings and landmarks pink, the offical ribbon color in the fight against breast cancer. And so, starting tomorrow at dusk, and continuing through October, Philly's skyline is going to glow pink as part of the breast cancer awareness campaign of KYW-TV and the Philadelphia affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in nine American women can now expect to develop breast cancer at some time in their lives, continuing a steady increase in the risk women face, according to the American Cancer Society. The society has been saying since 1987 that the average American woman faced a 1-in-10 chance of developing breast cancer. It revised the risk upward yesterday to reflect an increase in the reported incidence of breast cancer in the 1980s, due in part to better detection methods and the fact that women are living longer.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By James Cordrey, Special to The Inquirer
Thom Bernitsky and Lenore Urban, husband and wife, feel free to speak openly to each other. So when his wife was diagnosed as having breast cancer in 1989, Bernitsky said, they naturally talked about their feelings of devastation and confusion. There were questions that needed to be answered - the "whys," as Bernitsky put it - and depression that needed to be faced and dealt with. They sought counseling and went to sessions together. Bernitsky went to a partners group for husbands of women with breast cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO - New research casts doubt on a popular treatment for breast cancer: a week of radiation to part of the breast instead of longer treatment to all of it. Women who were given partial radiation were twice as likely to need their breasts removed later because the cancer came back, doctors found. The treatment uses radioactive pellets briefly placed in the breast instead of radiation beamed from a machine. At least 13 percent of older patients in the United States get this now, and it is popular with working women.
LIVING
January 29, 2001 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two years after studies showed no survival benefit for women who underwent bone marrow transplants for advanced breast cancer, the arduous treatment has become so unpopular that researchers cannot find enough patients for studies aimed at improving it and showing a benefit. What's more, some health insurers are refusing coverage for the few breast cancer patients who do want to participate in studies of new bone marrow transplant procedures. The treatment typically costs $60,000 to $100,000.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a drug industry sometimes accused of putting profits before patients, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s announcement of a new anticancer drug yesterday stood out: Patients cheered and investors shrugged. "It's incredible news!" Lizann DeAngelis, 43, a Downingtown woman with metastatic cancer, said after hearing that federal regulators had approved the breakthrough drug she has tried in vain to get. "This is another weapon in my arsenal. " The long-sought drug, Tykerb, developed by London-based GlaxoSmithKline partly at its facilities in Montgomery County, got a dimmer reaction from equity analysts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report. Send e-mail to gensleh@ phillynews .com
AUSTRALIAN pop star Kylie Minogue has been diagnosed with breast cancer. She has canceled her tour of Australia and will undergo immediate treatment. Known in the United States for the songs "Can't Get You Out of My Head," "Slow" and her album, "Fever," Minogue is a huge star overseas - a tabloid babe known for sexy clothing and a bum more famous than that of Jennifer Lopez. The 36-year-old performer's diagnosis was confirmed this week during a visit with her family in Melbourne.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
Purple Breasts, which opened Thursday night as part of the New Hope Performing Arts Festival, is the second area theater piece in as many days to search for art among the grim facts of illness and death. As with the first such piece, the AIDS revue C'est la Guerre at Philadelphia's Wilma Theater, the search goes largely unrewarded. A one-act play about breast cancer and its emotional effects, Purple Breasts was collaboratively developed in March 1989 at San Jose City College in California by a cast of four and director Daryl Lindstrom, who was suffering from metastatic breast cancer at the time.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
NEW YORK - NBC News' Andrea Mitchell says that she has breast cancer but that her prognosis is "terrific. " Mitchell made the announcement yesterday during her MSNBC show, "Andrea Mitchell Reports. " She said that the cancer was discovered during an annual screening "just a short time ago. " Counting herself among the one in eight women in the U.S. who have breast cancer, she said hers was caught in the early stage and noted she was already back at work. Mitchell, a 1967 University of Pennsylvania graduate, got her start that year with KYW NewsRadio in Philadelphia.
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