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Breast Cancer

NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Helen Felsenthal, 81, of Merion, an educator and two-time breast cancer survivor honored for her volunteer work with other mastectomy patients, died Friday, March 4, of Alzheimer's disease at her second home in Bradley Beach, N.J. A resident of Philadelphia since 1973, Dr. Felsenthal taught at every level - from elementary school to graduate education at the University of Pennsylvania, said her husband, Norman. Born and reared in Pittsburgh, she was the seventh of eight children and the only one to pursue higher education.
NEWS
June 5, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Millions of women at higher-than-usual risk of breast cancer have a new option for preventing the disease. Pfizer Inc.'s Aromasin cut the risk of developing breast cancer by more than half, without the side effects that have curbed enthusiasm for other prevention drugs, a major study found. It was the first test in healthy women of newer hormone-blocking pills called aromatase inhibitors, sold as Arimidex, Femara, and Aromasin, and in generic form. They are used now to prevent recurrences in breast-cancer patients who are past menopause, and doctors have long suspected they may help prevent initial cases, too. Women at higher risk because of gene mutations or other reasons already have two choices for prevention - tamoxifen and raloxifene.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Advanced breast cancer has increased slightly among young women, a 34-year analysis suggests. The disease remains uncommon among women younger than 40, and the small change has experts scratching their heads. The increase likely has numerous causes, said Rebecca Johnson, the lead author and medical director of a young adult cancer program at Seattle Children's Hospital. "The change might be due to some sort of modifiable risk factor, like a lifestyle change" or exposure to cancer-linked substances, she said.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
With the advent of mammography, the survival statistics are getting better, but breast cancer still kills more women than any other kind of cancer. About 40 Chester County nurses and physicians heard three experts on breast cancer give talks last week at the 16th annual Chester County Conference on Cancer at the West Chester Country Club, sponsored by the Chester County Hospital Tumor Conference and the American Cancer Society. Dr. Gordon Francis Schwartz, professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College; Dr. Robert L. Goodman, professor of radiation therapy at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Dr. Jane Alavi, of the department of hematology/oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, discussed the newest treatments for breast cancer.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Carol Tavris and Avrum Bluming
American women fear breast cancer more than heart disease, according to most studies, even though heart disease is responsible for 10 times as many female deaths every year - and heart disease deaths exceed breast cancer deaths in every decade of a woman's life. Of women who are diagnosed early with breast cancer, more than 90 percent will survive, and most will not need disfiguring mastectomies or even chemotherapy. But the media understand how deeply women fear breast cancer, and the result is that every study that seems to find a link between some new risk factor and the disease makes headlines, captures public attention and stimulates the blogosphere into overdrive.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Women at the highest risk of developing breast cancer - those age 50 and older - make the least use of breast cancer screening, for reasons that range from modesty about disrobing to doctors' failure to recommend that exams be done, health experts recently told Congress. Moreover, a congressional subcommittee was told, a recent survey shows that only 31 percent of all women follow the American Cancer Society's recommendation that women age 40 to 49 have a mammogram every other year, and that those age 50 and over have a mammogram every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012
Philly.com and  The Inquirer recently marked breast cancer awareness month by publishing 14 profiles of transformative moments reported by patients. They can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer.  This is one more in the series. In June 2009, following a routine mammogram, Nillie Wright, then 37, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Several women in her family had had breast cancer, so Nillie, of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., always knew she was a "ticking time bomb. But I did not expect it so soon!"
NEWS
September 2, 1994
When the model Vendela lost out as cover model for a charity album to support breast cancer research - largely because advocates objected to her preferred pose of partly bared breasts - some called the move narrow-minded and humorless. What's wrong, they asked, with a gorgeous, 20-something model adorning Women for Women, an album with female performers? Surely a little glamour couldn't hurt the cause? Such surface-only analysts miss the point. Yes, seduction sells. But should you really need it to attract support for research on a disease with no known cause or cure, which today afflicts 2.6 million American women and which one woman in eight will develop over her lifetime?
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | Associated Press
ESCONDIDO, Calif. - Less than two weeks after Angelina Jolie revealed she'd had a double mastectomy to avoid breast cancer, her aunt died from the disease Sunday. Debbie Martin died at age 61 at a hospital in Escondido, Calif., near San Diego, her husband, Ron Martin, told The Associated Press. Debbie Martin was the younger sister of Jolie's mother, Marcheline Bertrand, whose own death from ovarian cancer in 2007 inspired the surgery that Jolie described in a May 14 op-ed in the New York Times.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Rita Rubin, FOR THE INQUIRER
They call themselves "previvors. " Genetic testing revealed they had a high lifetime risk of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer. Their genetic predisposition sets them apart from other healthy women and from genetically predisposed women who've already been diagnosed with cancer. For some previvors, such as Sandy Cohen of Lafayette Hill, breast cancer had cut a swath through their families. They grew up thinking it was only a matter of time until they, too, followed their mothers and grandmothers into the oncologist's office.
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