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Breast Cancer

NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Advanced breast cancer has increased slightly among young women, a 34-year analysis suggests. The disease remains uncommon among women younger than 40, and the small change has experts scratching their heads. The increase likely has numerous causes, said Rebecca Johnson, the lead author and medical director of a young adult cancer program at Seattle Children's Hospital. "The change might be due to some sort of modifiable risk factor, like a lifestyle change" or exposure to cancer-linked substances, she said.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
With the advent of mammography, the survival statistics are getting better, but breast cancer still kills more women than any other kind of cancer. About 40 Chester County nurses and physicians heard three experts on breast cancer give talks last week at the 16th annual Chester County Conference on Cancer at the West Chester Country Club, sponsored by the Chester County Hospital Tumor Conference and the American Cancer Society. Dr. Gordon Francis Schwartz, professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College; Dr. Robert L. Goodman, professor of radiation therapy at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Dr. Jane Alavi, of the department of hematology/oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, discussed the newest treatments for breast cancer.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Carol Tavris and Avrum Bluming
American women fear breast cancer more than heart disease, according to most studies, even though heart disease is responsible for 10 times as many female deaths every year - and heart disease deaths exceed breast cancer deaths in every decade of a woman's life. Of women who are diagnosed early with breast cancer, more than 90 percent will survive, and most will not need disfiguring mastectomies or even chemotherapy. But the media understand how deeply women fear breast cancer, and the result is that every study that seems to find a link between some new risk factor and the disease makes headlines, captures public attention and stimulates the blogosphere into overdrive.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Women at the highest risk of developing breast cancer - those age 50 and older - make the least use of breast cancer screening, for reasons that range from modesty about disrobing to doctors' failure to recommend that exams be done, health experts recently told Congress. Moreover, a congressional subcommittee was told, a recent survey shows that only 31 percent of all women follow the American Cancer Society's recommendation that women age 40 to 49 have a mammogram every other year, and that those age 50 and over have a mammogram every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012
Philly.com and  The Inquirer recently marked breast cancer awareness month by publishing 14 profiles of transformative moments reported by patients. They can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer.  This is one more in the series. In June 2009, following a routine mammogram, Nillie Wright, then 37, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Several women in her family had had breast cancer, so Nillie, of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., always knew she was a "ticking time bomb. But I did not expect it so soon!"
NEWS
September 2, 1994
When the model Vendela lost out as cover model for a charity album to support breast cancer research - largely because advocates objected to her preferred pose of partly bared breasts - some called the move narrow-minded and humorless. What's wrong, they asked, with a gorgeous, 20-something model adorning Women for Women, an album with female performers? Surely a little glamour couldn't hurt the cause? Such surface-only analysts miss the point. Yes, seduction sells. But should you really need it to attract support for research on a disease with no known cause or cure, which today afflicts 2.6 million American women and which one woman in eight will develop over her lifetime?
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | Associated Press
ESCONDIDO, Calif. - Less than two weeks after Angelina Jolie revealed she'd had a double mastectomy to avoid breast cancer, her aunt died from the disease Sunday. Debbie Martin died at age 61 at a hospital in Escondido, Calif., near San Diego, her husband, Ron Martin, told The Associated Press. Debbie Martin was the younger sister of Jolie's mother, Marcheline Bertrand, whose own death from ovarian cancer in 2007 inspired the surgery that Jolie described in a May 14 op-ed in the New York Times.
SPORTS
October 23, 2012 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kurt Coleman understands toughness, and it's not just the kind you see after a collision so intense his helmet flies off. Some toughness runs deeper, and he saw it after a conversation he had with his father in November 2006, when the Eagles' starting safety was a freshman at Ohio State. Ron Coleman, an assistant principal and basketball coach at a high school in Ohio, felt a lump in his left chest that autumn. He was 56. He initially thought it was fatty tissue, but his physician wanted it examined.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Michelle Fay Cortez, BLOOOMBERG NEWS
Pfizer Inc.'s hormones, once used by millions of women to ease menopause symptoms, almost doubled the death risk from breast cancer, a U.S. study found. The findings from the U.S.-funded Women's Health Initiative are the first to tie Pfizer's hormone replacement therapy Prempro, already linked to higher rates of breast cancer and heart disease, to increased mortality from tumors. Pfizer, the world's largest drugmaker, on Tuesday won its sixth of 13 jury cases over Prempro's health risks an hour before the research was reported by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, FOR THE INQUIRER
For breast cancer survivors like Marie McCrone, the worry never quite stops. Despite a lumpectomy and lymph node removal in 2002, she feared recurrence of the cancer or the onset of lymphedema, a painful swelling of the arm that can occur long after surgery. "I heard all sorts of horror stories about it," recalls McCrone, 52, of Warrington, Bucks County. "How you might get it just from lifting a grocery bag. " Four years later, she heard about a weightlifting program for breast cancer survivors being tested at the University of Pennsylvania..
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