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Breast Cancer

NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Carol Tavris and Avrum Bluming
American women fear breast cancer more than heart disease, according to most studies, even though heart disease is responsible for 10 times as many female deaths every year - and heart disease deaths exceed breast cancer deaths in every decade of a woman's life. Of women who are diagnosed early with breast cancer, more than 90 percent will survive, and most will not need disfiguring mastectomies or even chemotherapy. But the media understand how deeply women fear breast cancer, and the result is that every study that seems to find a link between some new risk factor and the disease makes headlines, captures public attention and stimulates the blogosphere into overdrive.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Women at the highest risk of developing breast cancer - those age 50 and older - make the least use of breast cancer screening, for reasons that range from modesty about disrobing to doctors' failure to recommend that exams be done, health experts recently told Congress. Moreover, a congressional subcommittee was told, a recent survey shows that only 31 percent of all women follow the American Cancer Society's recommendation that women age 40 to 49 have a mammogram every other year, and that those age 50 and over have a mammogram every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012
Philly.com and  The Inquirer recently marked breast cancer awareness month by publishing 14 profiles of transformative moments reported by patients. They can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer.  This is one more in the series. In June 2009, following a routine mammogram, Nillie Wright, then 37, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Several women in her family had had breast cancer, so Nillie, of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., always knew she was a "ticking time bomb. But I did not expect it so soon!"
NEWS
September 2, 1994
When the model Vendela lost out as cover model for a charity album to support breast cancer research - largely because advocates objected to her preferred pose of partly bared breasts - some called the move narrow-minded and humorless. What's wrong, they asked, with a gorgeous, 20-something model adorning Women for Women, an album with female performers? Surely a little glamour couldn't hurt the cause? Such surface-only analysts miss the point. Yes, seduction sells. But should you really need it to attract support for research on a disease with no known cause or cure, which today afflicts 2.6 million American women and which one woman in eight will develop over her lifetime?
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | Associated Press
ESCONDIDO, Calif. - Less than two weeks after Angelina Jolie revealed she'd had a double mastectomy to avoid breast cancer, her aunt died from the disease Sunday. Debbie Martin died at age 61 at a hospital in Escondido, Calif., near San Diego, her husband, Ron Martin, told The Associated Press. Debbie Martin was the younger sister of Jolie's mother, Marcheline Bertrand, whose own death from ovarian cancer in 2007 inspired the surgery that Jolie described in a May 14 op-ed in the New York Times.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Rita Rubin, FOR THE INQUIRER
They call themselves "previvors. " Genetic testing revealed they had a high lifetime risk of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer. Their genetic predisposition sets them apart from other healthy women and from genetically predisposed women who've already been diagnosed with cancer. For some previvors, such as Sandy Cohen of Lafayette Hill, breast cancer had cut a swath through their families. They grew up thinking it was only a matter of time until they, too, followed their mothers and grandmothers into the oncologist's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Every year billions of dollars are spent on breast cancer research. Still, the disease rages on, although more women are surviving. A major national report released last week concluded that a key to reducing breast cancer would be to shift some of the focus - and increase funding - to prevention. One recommendation was to intensify the study of environmental factors that might affect whether a woman gets cancer and how long she survives afterward. The group's broad definition of environment included lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise, alcohol consumption, and maintaining proper weight.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Michelle Fay Cortez, BLOOOMBERG NEWS
Pfizer Inc.'s hormones, once used by millions of women to ease menopause symptoms, almost doubled the death risk from breast cancer, a U.S. study found. The findings from the U.S.-funded Women's Health Initiative are the first to tie Pfizer's hormone replacement therapy Prempro, already linked to higher rates of breast cancer and heart disease, to increased mortality from tumors. Pfizer, the world's largest drugmaker, on Tuesday won its sixth of 13 jury cases over Prempro's health risks an hour before the research was reported by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Women with advanced breast cancer will have an opportunity to participate in an experimental bone marrow transplant program, representatives of four Philadelphia hospitals were set to announce today. Under a unique arrangement, U.S. Healthcare will approve admission of its members to this program. Many private insurance carriers reject their subscribers' requests for bone marrow transplants as being experimental and not regarded as standard care. The cooperative venture involving Hahnemann and Temple universities, the University of Pennsylvania and Fox Chase Cancer Center was developed over the past year.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
The television commercial opens with a shot of a middle-aged man's troubled face. "I used to think I wasn't afraid of anything," the man says. What did scare him, he adds, was that his wife got breast cancer. The commercial's unconventional approach to advertising for treatment of breast cancer and the emotional struggle surrounding the disease focuses on the husband and only later does the wife come in. The commercial for Albert Einstein Medical Center's Breast Cancer Center will make its debut on television tonight and will be accompanied by a radio and print campaign.
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