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Breast Cancer

ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Every year billions of dollars are spent on breast cancer research. Still, the disease rages on, although more women are surviving. A major national report released last week concluded that a key to reducing breast cancer would be to shift some of the focus - and increase funding - to prevention. One recommendation was to intensify the study of environmental factors that might affect whether a woman gets cancer and how long she survives afterward. The group's broad definition of environment included lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise, alcohol consumption, and maintaining proper weight.
SPORTS
October 23, 2012 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kurt Coleman understands toughness, and it's not just the kind you see after a collision so intense his helmet flies off. Some toughness runs deeper, and he saw it after a conversation he had with his father in November 2006, when the Eagles' starting safety was a freshman at Ohio State. Ron Coleman, an assistant principal and basketball coach at a high school in Ohio, felt a lump in his left chest that autumn. He was 56. He initially thought it was fatty tissue, but his physician wanted it examined.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Michelle Fay Cortez, BLOOOMBERG NEWS
Pfizer Inc.'s hormones, once used by millions of women to ease menopause symptoms, almost doubled the death risk from breast cancer, a U.S. study found. The findings from the U.S.-funded Women's Health Initiative are the first to tie Pfizer's hormone replacement therapy Prempro, already linked to higher rates of breast cancer and heart disease, to increased mortality from tumors. Pfizer, the world's largest drugmaker, on Tuesday won its sixth of 13 jury cases over Prempro's health risks an hour before the research was reported by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Helen Felsenthal, 81, of Merion, an educator and two-time breast cancer survivor honored for her volunteer work with other mastectomy patients, died Friday, March 4, of Alzheimer's disease at her second home in Bradley Beach, N.J. A resident of Philadelphia since 1973, Dr. Felsenthal taught at every level - from elementary school to graduate education at the University of Pennsylvania, said her husband, Norman. Born and reared in Pittsburgh, she was the seventh of eight children and the only one to pursue higher education.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Women with advanced breast cancer will have an opportunity to participate in an experimental bone marrow transplant program, representatives of four Philadelphia hospitals were set to announce today. Under a unique arrangement, U.S. Healthcare will approve admission of its members to this program. Many private insurance carriers reject their subscribers' requests for bone marrow transplants as being experimental and not regarded as standard care. The cooperative venture involving Hahnemann and Temple universities, the University of Pennsylvania and Fox Chase Cancer Center was developed over the past year.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
The television commercial opens with a shot of a middle-aged man's troubled face. "I used to think I wasn't afraid of anything," the man says. What did scare him, he adds, was that his wife got breast cancer. The commercial's unconventional approach to advertising for treatment of breast cancer and the emotional struggle surrounding the disease focuses on the husband and only later does the wife come in. The commercial for Albert Einstein Medical Center's Breast Cancer Center will make its debut on television tonight and will be accompanied by a radio and print campaign.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, FOR THE INQUIRER
For breast cancer survivors like Marie McCrone, the worry never quite stops. Despite a lumpectomy and lymph node removal in 2002, she feared recurrence of the cancer or the onset of lymphedema, a painful swelling of the arm that can occur long after surgery. "I heard all sorts of horror stories about it," recalls McCrone, 52, of Warrington, Bucks County. "How you might get it just from lifting a grocery bag. " Four years later, she heard about a weightlifting program for breast cancer survivors being tested at the University of Pennsylvania..
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, a Canadian sports-medicine physician set out to show that breast cancer patients can benefit from exercise. And not just any exercise. Donald McKenzie was advocating strenuous, repetitive, resistance-oriented arm movement - the very kind such patients are usually told to avoid. So he formed a dragon boat team, called Abreast in a Boat. On Thursday evening, McKenzie will be at Main Line Health and Fitness Center to describe the success of that team, which has inspired the creation of dozens more in Canada and other countries.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The powerful but, some say, dangerous drug tamoxifen can prolong the lives of women with breast cancer following a mastectomy, researchers said today. In the most extensive review of its kind ever undertaken, scientists compiled data involving 75,000 women who had participated in 133 trials worldwide. The review, published in the British medical journal Lancet, showed that a combined treatment of tamoxifen and chemotherapy after surgery had the greatest effect on women with advanced breast cancer.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
There were a lot of laughs over a new type of breast prosthesis - one with fittings involving Saran wrap, Pam spray and a plaster-type substance. At the Brandywine Hospital ABC Support Group, the laughs are the flip side of tears women sometimes shed, trying to combat their feelings of loss and mortality after mastectomies. The feelings remain, but women can now share them with others in the Brandywine group, the only support group in Chester County specifically for women who have had breast surgery.
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