CollectionsBreast Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Breast Cancer

SPORTS
October 7, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WITH THE SUN consistently playing peek-a-boo behind the ash-colored clouds hovering above George Washington High's football field, Mary Jane Gilbert literally followed intently as Bonner-Prendergast marched toward last-second glory. Clad in a gray sweatshirt and pink bandana, Gilbert, who was between chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer, did her best to contend with the resulting change in temperatures. But, absolutely nothing would obscure her view. After all, her son, Joe Oquendo, was on that field.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For the eight years since her diagnosis in 2006, drugs, surgery, and chemotherapy had kept Debra Hinkle's breast cancer at bay. But now, the conventional treatments were failing, and the disease was spreading. So when her oncologist decided it was time for the Bucks County woman to consider relatively untested therapies, she was more than willing. "I thought that if I didn't do a clinical trial now, maybe I wouldn't be able to later," said Hinkle, 54, who lives in Newtown Township and works as a software-development project manager.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago, after successful treatment for breast cancer, anxiety became Susan Chase's constant companion. She was unable to sleep, and the unsettled feeling that "the sky was going to fall on me" plagued her daily life. "After all the treatments were done, it felt really horrifying," she says. "I was depressed, fragile, and hypervigilant. " The Mount Airy performer, dancer, and creative arts therapist consulted psychologists and tried a variety of anti-anxiety medications.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women whose breast tumors have spread to the skin are automatically diagnosed as stage III - advanced cancer with a relatively poor prognosis. But a new analysis by Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that classification approach is outdated and often unduly grim. The size of the tumor and whether it has spread to underarm lymph nodes are far more important predictors of survival than skin involvement, according to the study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. "Many women with tumors that happen to have spread to the skin may, unfortunately, be given an inaccurately dire prognosis - along with, perhaps, some unnecessary treatment," said study leader Richard J. Bleicher, a surgical oncologist at Fox Chase in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
No kids for Cam No ticking biological clock keeps Cameron Diaz awake at night. Glam Cam, a robust 41 (almost 42), tells Esquire (whose August cover she adorns) that motherhood holds no allure. "It's so much more work to have children," she tells the "Man at His Best" mag. "To have lives besides your own that you are responsible for - I didn't take that on. . . . A baby - that's all day, every day for 18 years. Not having a baby might really make things easier, but that doesn't make it an easy decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Joan Lunden fighting cancer Joan Lunden , who hosted ABC's Good Morning America from 1980 to 1997, went on the show Tuesday to say she is fighting breast cancer. This misfortune haunts the show: Cohost Robin Roberts has been treated for it, and so has cohost Amy Robach . Lunden said she had already started chemo and expects to make a full recovery.   Cleese exits Bond movies Monty Python Flying Circus genius John Cleese is out of the James Bond movie series.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a double mastectomy and hysterectomy, Eva Moon eased the anxiety with a limerick: I've just had a genetic test And I'm feeling a little depressed It's not just because I'll have menopause But I wasn't quite done with my breasts Humor isn't touted much in clinical trials or in FDA approvals, but when it comes to cancer, laughter is good medicine, according to Moon. A 58-year-old performing artist from Redmond, Wash., with fiery red hair and a sultry voice, Moon spoke at the Eighth Annual Joining FORCEs Conference in Philadelphia last week.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge who sentenced former District Judge Rita Arnold for hiding a citation against her son wanted to make an example of someone who abused judicial powers, Arnold's attorney argued in a Superior Court appeal filed this week. Judge John Braxton - who ordered Arnold to serve 16 to 32 months in state prison on two misdemeanors - ignored the Chester County woman's previously crime-free life, remorse, and ongoing treatment for cancer, her attorney said. Braxton, "focusing entirely on the fact that these crimes were committed in her capacity as a magisterial district judge [and for her son]
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 86-year-old Flossy Marcus and her big extended family, Mother's Day and the Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Race for the Cure mark both a yearly reunion and a celebration of the things they have in common: Their rich Jewish heritage, youthful features, and remarkably positive outlooks on life. "I've always had a good attitude . . .. I always say today is the first day of the rest of my life," said Marcus, who was at the annual breast cancer fund-raiser with her three daughters and stepdaughter.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|