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Breast Cancer

BUSINESS
August 16, 2016
At the Convention Centers Conventions expecting 500 or more to attend.    Date Attendance     Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention1     Aug. 15-18   3,000    American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition3     Aug. 21-24   15,000    Your Wedding Experience Presented by David Tutera1     Aug. 28   1,000    American Political Science Association 2     Sept. 1-4   6,500    ACN/GE Planning Event 20163     Sept.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Soon after Pennsylvania's breast density notification law took effect in 2014, Jules Sumkin found himself wanting to spare women from getting a letter that might alarm or perplex them. Twenty-eight states, including New Jersey and Delaware, now have laws that require mammography centers to inform women with dense breast tissue that it may increase the risk of cancer and obscure a malignancy on a mammogram, so they may want to talk to their doctors about extra imaging options. The letters don't mention quandaries that Sumkin, chair of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, knows too well: There are no guidelines for extra imaging, or any evidence that it saves lives.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
The lady was a tramp. That was part of her charm. Scarred, a tad surly. An alpha female if there ever was one. Duchess was her name. Liz Hardt, a softie for a tough dog, was smitten. "I fell in love with her immediately," said Hardt, a veterinary nurse. "She was a big, bad dog. " But there was something else. A kind of bond. Hardt was a cancer survivor. Duchess was, too. The pair met through a program that gives new meaning to the saying, "Who rescued whom?" Through the Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program, breast tumors are removed from homeless dogs that would otherwise go untreated and quite likely die. The dogs are then put up for adoption.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Doherty battles cancer Shannen Doherty is sharing her battle with breast cancer. The Beverly Hills, 90210 star has posted pics on Instagram that show her cutting her shoulder-length hair, then shaving her head. (Chemotherapy causes heavy hair loss.) Doherty, 45, tells the The Dr. Oz Show that if necessary, she has no qualms about undergoing a mastectomy. "Ultimately, they're just breasts, right?" she says. "I mean, I love them. . . . But in the grand scheme of things, I would rather be alive, and I would rather grow old with my husband.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A Boston-area start-up that is developing medicines for women's health, cancer, and endocrine diseases has opened a commercial and medical affairs office in Wayne to gear up for the potential launch of a new osteoporosis medicine. Radius Health Inc. has a lead drug candidate, abaloparatide, that had positive results in a patient study to reduce the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women with bone-depleting osteoporosis. The treatment, in a class of agents called anabolics that build bone rather than slow bone loss, is being reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
ISSUE | BREAST CANCER Stepping up to fight a deadly disease Thank you to the more than 2,000 people who came out last Sunday morning for the 15th annual Living Beyond Breast Cancer Reach and Raise yoga fund-raising event on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Together, 139 teams raised $373,617 to support women and men affected by breast cancer with a trusted source of information and a community of support. This event began as a dream, with a small yoga class of about a hundred people, and it has grown to be one of the city's most spectacular and powerful events.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | Gab Bonghi, Staff Writer
Death is essential for Pinkwash, the West Philly punk outfit. In 2009, vocalist and guitarist Joey Doubek lost his mother to cancer; years later, he's still dealing with grief in the form of music. On Friday, Pinkwash , which has received accolades from Pitchfork , NPR , and the Washington Post , will release its first full-length LP, Collective Sigh . It's the culmination of many things: Loss, self-reflection, and doubt. Doubek and drummer Ashley Arnwine first met in the Washington DIY music scene, where they collaborated in bands such as Mass Movement of the Moth and Ingrid . After a few years, Ingrid ended, and they went their separate ways.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
As sleety rain kept falling, the activists anguished about whether to go ahead with plans to lie on the ground on a recent Saturday evening. Their "die-in" was intended to symbolize the fact that, despite all the progress in taming breast cancer, it still takes about 40,000 lives a year in the United States. Imagine wiping out the population of Wilkes-Barre or Atlantic City. Every year. For three decades. Still, the demonstrators had to be pragmatic. Most members of their new group, MET-UP, had metastatic breast cancer and had to be careful to protect their fragile health.
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