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Breast Cancer

NEWS
February 28, 2016
More women with breast cancer - and an increasing number without - are choosing to have mastectomies over more breast-sparing procedures. And nearly half go home the same day, new federal statistics show. Data from 13 states representing one quarter of the U.S. population found the rate of mastectomy increased 36 percent from 2005 to 2013, while overall breast cancer incidence was unchanged. And 45 percent of mastectomies in 2013 were in hospital-affiliated outpatient surgery centers with no overnight stay, up 22 percent in a decade.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Super shopping, sensational skirts, sumptuous treats, and supportive friends all awaited the 60-plus attendees at a fund-raiser at Skirt in Bryn Mawr on Nov. 18. The event was held to raise funds and show support for the Living Beyond Breast Cancer organization. The $3,000 raised will be used to provide those in need with breast-cancer information and education through conferences, community meetings, online webinars, a toll-free help line, printed publications and newsletters, and a comprehensive website.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Excessive delays in breast cancer treatment may compromise patients' survival, according to two major studies published Thursday in JAMA Oncology. What's more, the women most likely to experience long delays were black or Hispanic, and one analysis found a correlation with lower incomes. One study, led by Fox Chase Cancer Center surgical oncologist Richard J. Bleicher, used patient information from two large federal databases to examine the impact on survival of delays in surgery for breast cancer that had not spread to distant organs.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
D EAR ABBY: When reading letters in your column concerning breast cancer, my heart goes out to every single person who has ever been diagnosed with this terrible disease. I have no respect for any man who cuts and runs when his wife is diagnosed with cancer. But what do you think about a woman who is diagnosed and whose husband remains with her through the fear and worry, the chemo, radiation, hair loss and all the follow-up? A husband who worries constantly for her and whose biggest fear is losing his wonderful wife, and after all this - she leaves him for another man?
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Anita Gray lives with lobular breast cancer that has metastasized to her bones. So, once a month, she drives from Flying Hills, near Reading, to Northeast Philadelphia's Cancer Treatment Centers of America to meet with her oncologist and discuss palliative treatment. Yet on Thursday, after an additional talk with an orthopedic surgeon - Gray's hip bones are deteriorating from the disease - she had an appointment that was a bit more enjoyable: a reflexology and reiki session at the new Image Recovery Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adding to debate and doubt over the value of breast cancer screening, the American Cancer Society on Tuesday affirmed that mammograms save lives - but for the first time suggested women should start the X-rays later in life. Until now, the venerable cancer organization's guidance has been simple: Yearly mammograms, starting at age 40, for as long as a woman is in good health. The update says women at average breast cancer risk should have annual mammograms from age 45 to 54, then "transition" to every other year, but "have the opportunity to continue annually.
NEWS
October 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SOME PEOPLE might tend to lose a little concentration when pastors drone on with their sermons. But not Richelle Phillips. She actually made notes and dissected the messages. "She found a way to make every message her very own," said her husband, James Phillips. That was Richelle Phillips. She had an analytical mind to go with the compassion that marked a life of service to children, young people in trouble and elderly folks who needed a lift. Richelle F. Phillips, a social worker, church leader and devoted mother, died Oct 3 of breast cancer.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Many women think that breast cancer runs in families, or that it strikes at random - in other words, there's nothing you can do to protect yourself other than vigilant screening. It's true there are some risk factors you can't control. But scientists have long known the odds of developing breast cancer can be greatly reduced with the same kind of healthy living that also fends off many cases of heart disease, diabetes, and other cancers: Eat a healthy diet. Get more exercise.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deb Gleason has had surgery for breast cancer twice. She had breast-sparing surgery on her left side in 2000 and a double mastectomy in 2012 when cancer returned on the right. Cancer-wise, she's had a clean bill of health since, but the second procedure left her with a miserable, incurable side effect that plagues millions of cancer survivors: lymphedema. The condition, caused by disruption of the body's lymphatic system, causes arms or legs to swell with fluid and fat. Until the last five years or so, the only treatments available to most patients included a combination of specialized massage, exercises, and compression garments.
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