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Breast Cancer

NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More and more women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are opting to remove both, even when they know the radical surgery is unlikely to prolong their lives. In an era of concern about rising health-care costs - and decades after breast-conserving lumpectomy with radiation was shown to be effective - experts find the double-mastectomy trend puzzling and disturbing. But it makes sense to women like Robyn Freeman of Haverford. An ultra-fit yoga teacher, she insisted on a double mastectomy after she felt a breast lump that turned out to be early-stage cancer in March.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
FALL APPEARS to have arrived, finally. The thought of hot apple cider, Halloween and haunted houses makes Temporary Tattle quite happy. There is some sadness, however: TT's editor for nearly a year marked his last day with the Daily News yesterday for an opportunity that can't be missed. So, we wish him the best and hope Albert Stumm (yeah, you're bold-faced alright) enjoys his last ride on the bullet train to Celebrityville. We hope you do, too. Woo-hoo! Yesterday Humanitarian slash actress Angelina Jolie is now a dame.
SPORTS
October 13, 2014 | By Avery Maehrer, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a rainy afternoon, the color pink brightened the field. At Upper Dublin on Saturday, the Cardinals and players from visiting Methacton wore pink shirts, socks, and headbands in recognition of the sixth annual Corners for Cancer event. Even the field hockey balls were pink, as the Warriors defeated Upper Dublin, 3-0, in a nonleague game. Methacton jumped out to a 1-0 lead less than six minutes into the first half, with freshman forward Olivia Hoover firing the ball into the net off an assist from Julia Dickinson.
SPORTS
October 7, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WITH THE SUN consistently playing peek-a-boo behind the ash-colored clouds hovering above George Washington High's football field, Mary Jane Gilbert literally followed intently as Bonner-Prendergast marched toward last-second glory. Clad in a gray sweatshirt and pink bandana, Gilbert, who was between chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer, did her best to contend with the resulting change in temperatures. But, absolutely nothing would obscure her view. After all, her son, Joe Oquendo, was on that field.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For the eight years since her diagnosis in 2006, drugs, surgery, and chemotherapy had kept Debra Hinkle's breast cancer at bay. But now, the conventional treatments were failing, and the disease was spreading. So when her oncologist decided it was time for the Bucks County woman to consider relatively untested therapies, she was more than willing. "I thought that if I didn't do a clinical trial now, maybe I wouldn't be able to later," said Hinkle, 54, who lives in Newtown Township and works as a software-development project manager.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago, after successful treatment for breast cancer, anxiety became Susan Chase's constant companion. She was unable to sleep, and the unsettled feeling that "the sky was going to fall on me" plagued her daily life. "After all the treatments were done, it felt really horrifying," she says. "I was depressed, fragile, and hypervigilant. " The Mount Airy performer, dancer, and creative arts therapist consulted psychologists and tried a variety of anti-anxiety medications.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women whose breast tumors have spread to the skin are automatically diagnosed as stage III - advanced cancer with a relatively poor prognosis. But a new analysis by Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that classification approach is outdated and often unduly grim. The size of the tumor and whether it has spread to underarm lymph nodes are far more important predictors of survival than skin involvement, according to the study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. "Many women with tumors that happen to have spread to the skin may, unfortunately, be given an inaccurately dire prognosis - along with, perhaps, some unnecessary treatment," said study leader Richard J. Bleicher, a surgical oncologist at Fox Chase in Philadelphia.
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