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Breast Cancer

NEWS
November 4, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THERESA OTERI was in Florida with her aunt, Nancy Desiderio, on Aug. 23, 2011, when a 5.8-magnitude earthquake in Virginia sent tremors up and down the East Coast. The two weren't among the millions of people who felt a hint of the unexpected quake. "But believe me," Oteri said, "our world shook. " Desiderio, an active, outgoing woman who at 60 looked a good decade younger, was diagnosed that day with stage 4 lung cancer. The grim diagnosis was completely unexpected. Desiderio had been in seemingly terrific shape.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Some call it the "icing on the cake. " Others deem it the "illusion of a protrusion. " But for Patricia Missiras, 57, of Brookhaven, having 3-D areolas and nipples tattooed to her reconstructed breasts goes much deeper. It's part of her quest to put her bilateral mastectomy, chemo, and radiation firmly in the rear-view mirror. "I want to look as normal as I did before," she says. "I know it's not going to look exactly the same, but I want to get back to where I was before all of this happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013
IT'S BEEN well-documented that exercise can help prevent chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease and, yes, even cancer. It can probably do more for your health than anything else (and help you look youthfully svelte, to boot). Here's another example. A study released early this month demonstrates that simply walking for an hour a day can reduce a postmenopausal woman's risk of developing breast cancer by a stunning 14 percent. And that's walking at a leisurely 3 mph pace - "without any other recreational physical activities, just walking," said Alpa V. Patel, a senior epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society and senior author of the study.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER Rita Arnold, the former Chester County district judge convicted of concealing a citation filed against her son, can get out of jail while her sentence is appealed with $100,000 cash bail, a judge ruled Friday. Arnold's attorney filed the request for bail, along with a motion to reconsider her sentence, after Arnold was sentenced Tuesday to serve 16 to 32 months in state prison. Arnold, who had been a judge for 16 years, is ill with a rare form of breast cancer. Her daughter said Friday that her health is at risk if she cannot continue to see her current doctors.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest debate over breast cancer screening, states are passing laws requiring mammography centers to tell women about their breast density so they can consider more imaging tests, such as ultrasound and MRI. Dense breast tissue makes finding cancer on a mammogram more difficult. It may also increase the chance of developing breast cancer. In the four years since Connecticut passed the first breast density law, 10 states have done so. Bills are pending in 19 states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and a federal bill has been introduced.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pink-laden ads of October refer to a single, straightforward disease called " breast cancer . " In reality, there are distinct types and classifications, based on where the cancer began, how it looks under the microscope, and whether it is still confined to its starting place. Breast cancers are further categorized based on whether the malignancy is fueled by hormones, and by the newest measurable characteristic - molecular activity. The four major molecular subtypes, which are determined by gene-expression profiling, are still largely a research tool.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Anne Redmond Parker was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1980, she knew it was not merely bad luck. The Toronto native had lost her mother, sister, and first cousin to the disease. Yet doctors told her that a genetic link was unlikely, and that even if it existed, there was nothing to be done about it. "There wasn't a lot of hope years ago," Parker, now 62, said in an interview. "Nobody talked about it. My marriage fell apart. There were no support groups. " On Wednesday, Parker will attend the Philadelphia premiere of the feature film Decoding Annie Parker . It tells the parallel odysseys of Parker and Mary-Claire King, the American geneticist who in 1994 isolated BRCA1 - the gene that is broken in Parker and millions of others worldwide.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after lumpectomy became a standard option for women with breast cancer, men are seeking a similarly targeted approach to prostate cancer, one that gets rid of the tumor while preserving the organ. This sensible tack has lagged in prostate cancer for many reasons, starting with the fact that the golf-ball-size gland is inaccessible. It lies deep within the pelvic cavity, surrounded by sensitive structures that are vital to sexual and urinary health. Now, however, an array of technologies is enabling doctors to visualize and zap away prostate malignancies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
A LONE WOMAN stood in the middle of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge one frigid January day, looking down at the Delaware River. Something seemed off to a police officer bicycling past, so he followed the woman. But this wasn't some troubled soul looking for a quick way out. It was NBC10's Lu Ann Cahn. And although Cahn, then 53, was all too familiar with feelings of despair, she wasn't suicidal. In fact, she was outside on that cold afternoon because she had been in a funk and had come up with a clever way to get herself out of it: She would do something new every day during the year 2010.
SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Morgan Hyman might never fire a cross-court volley for the winning point in a championship match for the Moorestown girls' tennis team. Emily Troy might never score the big goal in a big victory for the Moorestown girls' soccer or lacrosse teams. But every South Jersey athlete would do well to take a tip from the Moorestown juniors. So, too, would every South Jersey coach and athletic director. Hyman and Troy are founders and self-styled "captains" of the Breakfast Buddies, a program designed to provide nutritious before-school snacks for underprivileged students in the Moorestown district.
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