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Breast Cancer

NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once almost unthinkable, cutting off healthy breasts to prevent cancer is increasingly common among women with certain gene mutations and, as Angelina Jolie found, often restores a sense of control. "I feel empowered that I made a strong choice that in no ways diminishes my femininity," the movie star wrote Tuesday in a New York Times op-ed. Jolie, who watched her mother die of ovarian cancer at age 56, inherited a mutation in a gene, BRCA1, that puts her at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelina Jolie trended high among worldwide Twitter topics all day Tuesday. In a New York Times op-ed, she said she'd had a preventive double mastectomy after learning she carried a gene that carried with it an unusually high risk of breast cancer. The outpouring of support was unusual even for Twitter. Stars, especially, praised Jolie's resolve. Kristen Bell called her Times op-ed "admirable," and director Adam Shankman called it "beautiful. " Nia Vardalos called for "a moment of quiet respect for Angelina Jolie's candor and all women's bravery in facing this choice.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some, Mother's Day involved brunch. For others, a few blissful hours to putter in the garden or to read a book. In Philadelphia, thousands marked the day to honor Mom by walking or running to help protect all women. The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, the region's largest one-day breast cancer fund-raiser, brought together grandmothers, mothers, mothers-to-be and little girls far too young to be thinking about motherhood. Men participated too, an important reminder that they are not immune to breast cancer.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise Benn spent Mother's Day last year enduring the effects of chemotherapy, trying to treat the cancer that invaded her colon and worried her five sons. One of those sons is Arrelious Benn, now an Eagles wide receiver and in better spirits than a year ago. One of the reasons is the health of Denise, whose cancer is in remission. On Saturday, one day before Mother's Day, Denise joined her five sons on Team Arrelious, created for the Susan G. Komen Global Race for the Cure, a 5K walk/run in his native Washington.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Temple football team has been participating in the annual Komen Philadelphia Race for the Cure since 2006. The Owls, however, will have added roles in Sunday's fund-raiser for breast cancer research at the Eakins Oval/Philadelphia Museum of Art. Fifteen members of Temple's football family - including head coach Matt Rhule and his wife, Julie - will participate in the 5K race, 5K walk, or 1-mile walk. More than 50 others associated with the Big East program have volunteered to hand out water.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It took two years, roughly 100 interviews, a dozen workshops, and 21/2 hours in three acts for 1812 Productions to birth It's My Party: The Women and Comedy Project . But Jennifer Childs' examination of why women are funny (Christopher Hitchens' infamous Vanity Fair article stating the opposite gets mentioned and drop-kicked out of the room early on) still seems to be suffering some labor pains. The trouble comes from both the show's content and its form. Its ensemble of seven includes some of Philly's funniest and best-loved performers: Melanie Cotton, Charlotte Ford, Drucie McDaniel, Bi Jean Ngo, Cathy Simpson, Susan Riley Stevens, and Cheryl Williams.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In January, Michelle Friedman of Mount Laurel celebrated her 46th birthday with more than 100 friends, many of them e-mail buddies who came from all over the country to wish her well. Afterward, she described the experience on her blog, "I'll Say It Once!": "Nine days ago I had people treat me like a big star. I know what it's like to be treated like a VIP. It rocks; I hope you all get to experience it, especially for something like a birthday. " To her family, said her husband, Ken, she was always "a rock star.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As legal questions go, it is very succinct: Can human genes be patented? To the uninitiated, and at least two judges, it might seem obvious - or absurd. How can you get a patent for human genes? Aren't genes part of the human body, part of nature? Can you get a patent for a human leg or kidney, or the sun or the moon? The U.S. Supreme Court will wrestle with the question of whether human genes are patentable during oral arguments Monday in a case that could have huge implications for people needing cancer testing, scientific researchers, and pharmaceutical organizations, but also agricultural producers, other industries, and, perhaps, individual liberty.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Montgomery County hospital will be offering free breast cancer screenings for uninsured women over 40 years of age next month. Holy Redeemer Women's HealthCare at Southampton will provide the exams on Wednesday, April 17, from 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. by appointment to women who qualify. In addition to a mammogram, women will meet with a nurse and breast surgeon for a breast exam. To register call 1-800-818-4747 by April 12. The hospital is located at 45 2d Street Pike.   Contact staff writer Mari A. Schaefer at 610-892-9149, mschaefer@phillynews.com or @MariSchaefer on Twitter.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one likes having a colonoscopy - a big reason why the colon cancer screening is underused. Nonetheless, growing research suggests that older folks are having unnecessary colonoscopies. The latest study of routine colonoscopies among people over 70 found that nearly a quarter were getting "potentially inappropriate" tests, based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. Those guidelines say that people at average risk of colon cancer should have a colonoscopy once a decade starting at age 50, and stop at age 75. The rationale is that the disease usually progresses slowly, so people near the end of their lives are unlikely to live longer with early detection and treatment.
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