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Breast Cancer

NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Anne Redmond Parker was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1980, she knew it was not merely bad luck. The Toronto native had lost her mother, sister, and first cousin to the disease. Yet doctors told her that a genetic link was unlikely, and that even if it existed, there was nothing to be done about it. "There wasn't a lot of hope years ago," Parker, now 62, said in an interview. "Nobody talked about it. My marriage fell apart. There were no support groups. " On Wednesday, Parker will attend the Philadelphia premiere of the feature film Decoding Annie Parker . It tells the parallel odysseys of Parker and Mary-Claire King, the American geneticist who in 1994 isolated BRCA1 - the gene that is broken in Parker and millions of others worldwide.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after lumpectomy became a standard option for women with breast cancer, men are seeking a similarly targeted approach to prostate cancer, one that gets rid of the tumor while preserving the organ. This sensible tack has lagged in prostate cancer for many reasons, starting with the fact that the golf-ball-size gland is inaccessible. It lies deep within the pelvic cavity, surrounded by sensitive structures that are vital to sexual and urinary health. Now, however, an array of technologies is enabling doctors to visualize and zap away prostate malignancies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
A LONE WOMAN stood in the middle of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge one frigid January day, looking down at the Delaware River. Something seemed off to a police officer bicycling past, so he followed the woman. But this wasn't some troubled soul looking for a quick way out. It was NBC10's Lu Ann Cahn. And although Cahn, then 53, was all too familiar with feelings of despair, she wasn't suicidal. In fact, she was outside on that cold afternoon because she had been in a funk and had come up with a clever way to get herself out of it: She would do something new every day during the year 2010.
SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Morgan Hyman might never fire a cross-court volley for the winning point in a championship match for the Moorestown girls' tennis team. Emily Troy might never score the big goal in a big victory for the Moorestown girls' soccer or lacrosse teams. But every South Jersey athlete would do well to take a tip from the Moorestown juniors. So, too, would every South Jersey coach and athletic director. Hyman and Troy are founders and self-styled "captains" of the Breakfast Buddies, a program designed to provide nutritious before-school snacks for underprivileged students in the Moorestown district.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna P. Scott, 61, of Media, a doctor who loved children and dedicated her life to caring for them, died Thursday, Sept. 12, of breast cancer at her home. Despite the harshness of her medical regimen, she never complained or missed a day of work, her family said. At the time of her death, she was medical director at ProgenyHealth in Conshohocken. Dr. Scott began working in 2007 at the firm, which manages the cases of premature babies and infants with complex medical issues during their first year of life.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with their white counterparts, black women don't survive as long with breast cancer because they tend to be sicker with other conditions and have more advanced cancers at diagnosis, say researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania. That black patients do not do as well with breast cancer as white women is well known. In a report published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Philadelphia group found that 55.9 percent of black patients were alive five years after diagnosis, compared with 68.8 percent of white patients.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the U.S. Supreme Court ready for boobie bracelets? That's the next possible step after an appeals court in Philadelphia on Monday sided with two Easton, Pa.-area girls who contended that their middle school violated their First Amendment rights by banning their "I ♥ boobies!" breast-cancer awareness bracelets in October 2010. The ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit was the latest victory for Kayla Martinez and Brianna Hawk, but not necessarily the end of their legal journey.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | Art Carey, For The Inquirer
In late June, Muffy McCabe won the women's golf tournament at the Philadelphia Country Club. There was a certain inevitability about it, truthfully, and it shouldn't come as a big surprise. Her relatives have been members of the club for three generations. McCabe began playing golf when she was 6. When she was at Shipley School, she played in the third position on the boys' varsity (there was no girls' team). As an adult, in her mid-30s, she played golf every day and excelled in interclub contests.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Louise Leuters met her husband at 16 at a roller-skating rink in Port Richmond. She married up. He was from Fishtown. They have been married 61 years now, and the love is still there but her knees are gone, bone on bone, and this is a concern. Because who is going to take over as president of the Ladies of Port Richmond? Mary Louise - Mary Lou to friends, or even just Lou - is a two-time breast cancer survivor. She felt so grateful to her doctors and hospital that she wanted to give back.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Bernadette Nolan, 52, a member of singing sister act the Nolans, died of cancer July 4 in London, surrounded by her family, the singer's management agency, Urban Associates, said in a statement. Universally known as Bernie, Ms. Nolan was raised in Blackpool, in northwestern England, and began performing with her family when she was a child. The Nolans had a worldwide hit in 1979 with "I'm in the Mood for Dancing," and gained large followings from Britain to Japan. Ms. Nolan left the group in 1994 to focus on an acting career that included a role on the soap opera Brookside and parts in stage musicals including Blood Brothers and Chicago.
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