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Breast Cancer

NEWS
August 5, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ELSA SCHIAPARELLI might have shocked the world with her surrealistic fashion designs, but she didn't shock Monica Elaine Brown. As a senior collection assistant for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Monica helped mount "Shocking!: The Art and Fashion of Elsa Schiaparelli" there. The exhibit from September 2003 to January 2004 showcased the work of the late Italian designer, who was influenced by surrealist artists like Salvador Dali and Jean Cocteau. It was just one of the important exhibits Monica helped bring to the museum, featuring some of the world's most prominent designers, and she did so with a seriousness of purpose that marked her lifelong approach to her art. Monica Elaine Brown, a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., who traveled the world and the U.S. to mount fashion exhibits in the major cities, a fashion designer and artist, died July 29 of breast cancer.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the ongoing debate over the pros and cons of breast- cancer screening with mammograms, one of the hottest issues is overdiagnosis - and its potential dangers to women. "Overdiagnosis is the diagnosis of a tumor that would not have become clinically apparent in the absence of screening," explains an editorial in last week's JAMA Internal Medicine. "Treatment of an overdiagnosed tumor cannot provide benefit, but it can lead to harm. " The editorial accompanies a new study that investigated the problem by using government data to correlate use of mammography in 547 U.S. counties with breast-cancer incidence and deaths over a decade.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of a protein shed by tumor cells in the ovaries, researchers have tried unsuccessfully to use it for an ovarian-cancer screening test. Now, a mammoth, long-awaited United Kingdom study has had some success by tracking rapid changes in blood levels of the protein, CA125, rather than simply elevations above a presumed normal. A key to this screening strategy is an ovarian-cancer risk formula, or algorithm, developed over many years by a Harvard biostatistician with help from oncologists, including ones at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheryle Goldberg, 69, an almost 37-year survivor, has walked in every one of the 25 Philadelphia breast cancer walks on Mother's Day. In honor of her longevity - and the event's 25th anniversary - on Sunday, she led the emotional and ceremonial survivors' parade down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. What made the day most significant for the Warminster woman - diagnosed in 1978, when for so many a diagnosis was a death sentence -...
SPORTS
May 11, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerome Williams did not pitch one game in 2010 on American soil. It is the only season in his 13-year career in which the Phillies pitcher did not pitch in the major or minor leagues. Instead, Williams played in Taiwan. He resurrected his career on the small island near the Chinese coast. And he discovered a reminder of his past. A pink baseball glove - Williams had never seen one before - was for sale in a Taiwan sporting goods store. His mother had died nine years earlier from breast cancer.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers who study hereditary breast and ovarian cancer call it "the Angelina Jolie Effect. " They reported a sustained global surge in requests for BRCA genetic testing after the actress wrote about her preventive mastectomy two years ago. Last month, she gave another boost to awareness when she wrote about her recent surgery to remove her ovaries. But raising awareness hasn't necessarily lowered barriers, BRCA experts say. People seeking to identify and manage their inherited cancer risk often confront conflicting, confusing medical guidelines, test options, and insurance coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
  R   ITA WILSON , the actress wife of Tom Hanks , is recovering from a bilateral mastectomy for breast cancer. Rita, 58, had been appearing in Larry David 's play "Fish in the Dark" on Broadway and will return May 5, according to her publicist, Heidi Schaeffer . Wilson, in a statement to People magazine, said yesterday that she is expected to make a full recovery and credited getting a doctor's second opinion after...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Wilson has breast cancer Rita Wilson told People on Tuesday that she underwent a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery last week. "With my husband by my side, and with the love and support of family and friends, I underwent a bilateral mastectomy . . . after a diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma," Wilson, 58, said in a statement. "I am recovering and, most importantly, expected to make a full recovery. " Wilson has been married to Tom Hanks since 1988. The actress is on sick leave from her Broadway play Fish in the Dark , in which she costars with Rosie Perez .   Quaid vid: Is it real craziness?
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In her latest op-ed confessional, Angelina Jolie succinctly captured the complex dilemmas faced by women who carry a genetic defect that predisposes them to breast and ovarian cancer. Two years ago, the actress, who has a BRCA1 mutation, had both breasts removed. That largely eliminated her 87 percent chance of developing breast cancer, but did nothing to reduce her 50 percent chance of ovarian cancer. So last week, at age 39, she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. While that cut her ovarian cancer risk by 85 percent, it also ended her fertility, plunged her into menopause, and left her with an estrogen deficiency that raises her risks of problems such as osteoporosis and heart disease.
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