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Breast Cancer

NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one likes having a colonoscopy - a big reason why the colon cancer screening is underused. Nonetheless, growing research suggests that older folks are having unnecessary colonoscopies. The latest study of routine colonoscopies among people over 70 found that nearly a quarter were getting "potentially inappropriate" tests, based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. Those guidelines say that people at average risk of colon cancer should have a colonoscopy once a decade starting at age 50, and stop at age 75. The rationale is that the disease usually progresses slowly, so people near the end of their lives are unlikely to live longer with early detection and treatment.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Webster Mansuy, 61, of Worcester, Montgomery County, who worked in public education for 40 years, died Saturday, March 2, of breast cancer 36 hours after arriving at Meadowood Retirement Community for rehabilitation. Mrs. Mansuy (pronounced Man-SAY) was diagnosed in September 2010 with an unspecified cancer that developed into breast and, later, brain cancer. She continued to work until August 2011 while mounting a vigorous fight against the disease. Born in Norristown, the daughter of Eugene and Betty Shuler Webster, Mrs. Mansuy was all about work.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
COURTNEY SIMMONS always wanted to be an attorney. So she enrolled in Constitution High School, figuring its emphasis on history would give her a good grounding in the law. Now a senior, she plans to be a pediatric nurse, instead. Why the change? "Things happened," she says. How can I describe what happened to Courtney without making her seem pitiable? Especially when her classmates and teachers speak of her with awe? "It's hard to imagine what this place will be like when she's off at college," says Constitution teacher Kathy Melville.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Advanced breast cancer has increased slightly among young women, a 34-year analysis suggests. The disease remains uncommon among women younger than 40, and the small change has experts scratching their heads. The increase likely has numerous causes, said Rebecca Johnson, the lead author and medical director of a young adult cancer program at Seattle Children's Hospital. "The change might be due to some sort of modifiable risk factor, like a lifestyle change" or exposure to cancer-linked substances, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Every year billions of dollars are spent on breast cancer research. Still, the disease rages on, although more women are surviving. A major national report released last week concluded that a key to reducing breast cancer would be to shift some of the focus - and increase funding - to prevention. One recommendation was to intensify the study of environmental factors that might affect whether a woman gets cancer and how long she survives afterward. The group's broad definition of environment included lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise, alcohol consumption, and maintaining proper weight.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Winter's cruelest months A recent study has found that more fatal heart attacks and strokes occur in winter than at other times of the year After studying about 1.7 million death certificates filed between 2005 and 2008, cardiologists Bryan Schwartz and Robert A. Kloner found a 26 percent to 36 percent greater death rate from heart attacks in winter than in summer. The worst months are December, January, February, and early March. The doctors analyzed the cause of death for people in seven areas, including Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Charles Yeo could hardly have been mistaken for a preacher, not with the white lab coat. But as the surgeon mingled among the crowd in a ground floor auditorium at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, one could see why he referred to the mid-November gathering as "almost a religious experience. " It was the fifth annual Pancreatic Cancer symposium, a chance for survivors and those recently diagnosed to learn about the latest advances and - not least - to give each other moral support.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON - Four sisters with breast cancer who claimed in a lawsuit that their cancer was caused by synthetic estrogen that their mother took during pregnancy in the 1950s have reached a settlement with the drug company Eli Lilly and Co. Attorney Julie Oliver-Zhang said that the settlement, for an undisclosed amount, was reached on Wednesday, the second day of a trial in U.S. District Court in Boston. The sisters had not specified damages sought in the lawsuit. Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly said that it still believes its medication didn't cause the sisters' conditions but that a settlement is in its best interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband is now involved in his third computer affair. He's a teacher, and his first one was with a student. He was almost fired over it. He apologized to me and to his supervisor, said it was an "error in judgment" and promised it would never happen again. Last week I found an email he had sent to another former student, and the things he said to her were disgusting. I know if this gets back to his boss, he'll be fired. He's a brilliant man and an excellent teacher.
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