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Breast Feeding

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NEWS
October 16, 2007
CHRISTINE Flowers (op-ed, "Milking the System," Oct. 12) has a legitimate argument that a nursing mother was awarded an overly generous accommodation on a medical licensing exam. But her comment should have been limited to just "some practitioners" when she said that the decision regarding breast-feeding gives "us an idea of the fanaticism of its practitioners. " I have no doubt that her comment reflects disapproval of breast-feeding in public. She is obviously offended by the exposed breasts, but a trip to the supermarket reveals an awful lot of cleavage on display - often, a lot more flesh is exposed there than by a nursing mother.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | Suzanne Barston
I was dismayed to see the interview with Arnetta Stewart and Katja Pigur of the Maternity Care Coalition (" An effort to increase breast-feeding in Philly " which appreared on June 5). While the breast-feeding initiation rates cited are spot-on (78 percent of mothers initiating breast-feeding), the hand-wringing about their inadequacy is not. These statistics do not take into account the deeply personal reasons the remaining 22 percent do not breast-feed from birth - women who have undergone mastectomies, women on certain contraindicated or borderline medications, and women who have histories of sexual trauma, to name a few. Seen in proper context, 79 percent nationwide is pretty darn impressive.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
I've been breast-feeding my baby for three months and would like to continue after returning to work in February. However, I'm quite nervous about simultaneously being an office manager and a nursing mother. I know it's possible to pump milk and store it, but what if my baby won't take a bottle, what if I start leaking in the middle of a business meeting, or what if my milk dries up? Twenty years ago, breast-feeding and working outside the home were mutually exclusive. Not so today, when nursing mothers can pump their milk in privacy and store it in insulated carriers, or nurse their babies at on-site day-care centers.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Nationwide, 78 percent of new moms start breast-feeding their infants. Which means that 22 percent do not, a figure that distresses breast-feeding advocates. The scenario is even more worrisome in Philadelphia, where in 2011, the most recent data available, just 62 percent begin breast-feeding. The Maternity Care Coalition, a nonprofit formed in 1980, aims to increase that number. Although its overall mission is to improve health and well-being for moms and their children, it is perhaps best-known for its MOMobile, sending lactation nurses and outreach workers into low-income neighborhoods to work with women and promote breast-feeding.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
  Blame the hippo. Had Genny, the 3,000-pound queen of the Adventure Aquarium, not glided up to the edge of her glass tank as Lynn Heinisch breast-fed her son below, Lynn's husband, Lou, would never have taken a photo his bride uploaded to Facebook. Though Aquarium biologists insist it's just coincidence, the hippo, a species that nurses underwater, appears to be watching Heinisch and smiling approvingly. Facebook, born of the primal urge to rate college girls "hot or not," took the opposite stance.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the well-established health benefits of breast-feeding for children, Philadelphia remains a laggard in its practice. Only 29 percent of the city's mothers are still breast-feeding six months after childbirth, according to Esther Chung, professor of pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College. That is the lowest rate among the nation's 10 largest cities, and 11 percentage points below the national average. Wednesday, the city government took a small step to rectify those figures by mandating that employers provide breast-feeding employees a private, sanitary space and the necessary time to express breast milk.
NEWS
September 23, 2005
I AM A 60-year-old father of two and grandfather of six (soon to be seven). Comparing the right to breast-feed in public to smoking or urinating in public, as op-ed writer Christine Flowers did, is obscene. Smoking or urinating in public poses a significant health hazard - breast-feeding poses significant health benefits for the infant and, if recent research can be believed, for the mother, too. Should the mother have asked you if you minded? Probably, but to relegate breast-feeding to public restrooms (which are largely very unsanitary places)
NEWS
June 22, 2005
AFTER READING Michelle Malkin's June 20 op-ed ("Breast-feeding snobs of 'The View' "), I was forced to change my opinion that I could never agree with her. And Ms. Malkin may have missed an opportunity to explain why the co-hosts of "The View" look on breast-feeding in such a negative way. Could it be that a company with some connection to a formula or baby-food manufacturer sponsors the show? Surely Ms. Malkin, of all people, can understand that in the current political climate, corporate money does the talking and shapes "the views" - and not only on insipid TV shows.
LIVING
December 8, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In developing countries, children are breast-fed for two, three, even four years. In this country, only one-fifth of women nurse their babies for as long as six months - and many supplement their breast milk with baby formula. No wonder, then, that new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics urging women to breast-feed for at least a year have made national headlines and set off debate. Breast-feeding in the United States is only partly a matter of nourishing babies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Adrianne Edwards vividly recalls being a scared college sophomore, age 21, in labor at a hospital where the nurses' primary concern seemed to be freeing up her hospital bed. "I felt like my doctors and nurses were pressuring me to have a C-section," she said. She wanted a medication-free birth but instead received inducing drugs and then an epidural. "If I'd had more information, I would've had a totally different birth. " Now, Edwards, 29, the working mother of an 8-year-old, wants to help change that script for other teen and single moms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | Suzanne Barston
I was dismayed to see the interview with Arnetta Stewart and Katja Pigur of the Maternity Care Coalition (" An effort to increase breast-feeding in Philly " which appreared on June 5). While the breast-feeding initiation rates cited are spot-on (78 percent of mothers initiating breast-feeding), the hand-wringing about their inadequacy is not. These statistics do not take into account the deeply personal reasons the remaining 22 percent do not breast-feed from birth - women who have undergone mastectomies, women on certain contraindicated or borderline medications, and women who have histories of sexual trauma, to name a few. Seen in proper context, 79 percent nationwide is pretty darn impressive.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Nationwide, 78 percent of new moms start breast-feeding their infants. Which means that 22 percent do not, a figure that distresses breast-feeding advocates. The scenario is even more worrisome in Philadelphia, where in 2011, the most recent data available, just 62 percent begin breast-feeding. The Maternity Care Coalition, a nonprofit formed in 1980, aims to increase that number. Although its overall mission is to improve health and well-being for moms and their children, it is perhaps best-known for its MOMobile, sending lactation nurses and outreach workers into low-income neighborhoods to work with women and promote breast-feeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Adrianne Edwards vividly recalls being a scared college sophomore, age 21, in labor at a hospital where the nurses' primary concern seemed to be freeing up her hospital bed. "I felt like my doctors and nurses were pressuring me to have a C-section," she said. She wanted a medication-free birth but instead received inducing drugs and then an epidural. "If I'd had more information, I would've had a totally different birth. " Now, Edwards, 29, the working mother of an 8-year-old, wants to help change that script for other teen and single moms.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Keta Brown's daughter, Naomi, was born seven months ago, Brown knew almost nothing about breast-feeding. "My parents didn't breast-feed, so they didn't know" either, she added. But the North Philadelphia woman found support where many people do in 2015: Facebook. Through a group that chats online and meets in person, she received technical advice, commiseration, and encouragement. "If I didn't have that group, I think I would have been done at two weeks," she said. That type of community-building was the goal of Black Breast-feeding Week, a nationwide initiative running Aug. 25 through 31 to encourage African American women to try to stick with breast-feeding.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1989, an international panel of experts called attention to the irony that health workers were preventing many newborns from getting the healthiest possible food - mother's milk. Hospital maternity units were contributing, "however unwittingly," to the long decline in breast-feeding by failing to encourage moms to do it, or by introducing practices that discourage it, such as giving baby formula. The panel's statement, sponsored by the World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund, led to a global hospital reform movement called Baby Friendly.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In response to requests from traveling mothers, Philadelphia International Airport and Minute Suites, a micro-hotel inside security and near the airline gates, are making private rooms available to mothers to breast-feed or pump breast milk between flights. Minute Suites opened at the airport in spring 2011 between Terminal A and Concourse B, with 13 private rooms for passengers to nap, relax, or work. The rooms, seven feet by eight feet, will be free to nursing mothers for the first 30 minutes, and cost $14 for an additional half-hour.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the well-established health benefits of breast-feeding for children, Philadelphia remains a laggard in its practice. Only 29 percent of the city's mothers are still breast-feeding six months after childbirth, according to Esther Chung, professor of pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College. That is the lowest rate among the nation's 10 largest cities, and 11 percentage points below the national average. Wednesday, the city government took a small step to rectify those figures by mandating that employers provide breast-feeding employees a private, sanitary space and the necessary time to express breast milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilde is a mom It's a good thing to love your baby. Olivia Wilde does and she's not afraid to show it: The Rush star is featured in a Glamour mag photo shoot breast-feeding five-month-old son Otis . "Being shot with Otis is so perfect because any portrait of me right now isn't complete without my identity as a mother being a part of that," Wilde tells the mag. "Breast-feeding is the most natural thing. . . . now it feels like Otis should always be on my breast.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
If you're a parent-to-be interested in going "back to basics" - breast-feeding, intervention-free childbirth, cloth diapering and baby-wearing - it would seem that the world is your Pack 'N Play, or at least your preschool: At Mama's Wellness Joint in Center City, there's infant massage, baby sign language, or yoga-puncture. For parents interested in cloth diapering and baby-wearing techniques, free classes are offered at the Nesting House in Mount Airy. And at Ali's Wagon in Fairmount, the cornucopia of learning includes Foods for Fertility, Craniosacral Therapy for Healthy Kids, and Attachment Parenting: How to Make it Work for You. Bubbies and nanas may dismiss such a state of affairs ("Who knew from parenting styles?"
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allegra Avila likes to spend time in Doylestown's coffee shops and library with her 20-month-old daughter, Ora, but she feels anxious when it's time to breast-feed. "Feeding in public is not an easy thing to do," the young mother says. "It's uncomfortable, wondering what people are thinking about you. " Now, thanks to a measure passed by the Borough Council, "I can nurse when the baby is hungry," Avila said Tuesday. "I will be able to relax. " The council voted, 6-3, Monday to amend its antidiscrimination law to protect a woman's right to breast-feed in public.
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