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Breast Feeding

NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Generations of mothers have believed that having a glass of beer or wine helps with breast-feeding. But yesterday, science debunked that age-old piece of folk wisdom. Drinking even a small amount of alcohol changes the odor and taste of a mother's breast milk and can cause her baby to consume less milk during breast-feeding, a group of Philadelphia researchers found. This contradicts the widely held notion that a little alcohol can be a good thing, because it relaxes the mother and baby and helps build up the milk supply.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once she thought she might pursue a career in music. Perhaps playing the bass. But here she was, making an evening house call at a brick bungalow in Collingdale, armed with a baby scale, a life-sized baby doll and a little cloth model of the human female breast. Meet Chris Mulford: professional lactation consultant. Mulford's mission, which she shares with about 1,500 lactation consultants nationwide - and about 2,000 worldwide - is to offer advice, help, support and encouragement to new mothers and babies who are having trouble making what should be one of nature's most natural connections.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The baby, cradled in a sling and strapped over Penni Bacheler's right shoulder, nudged gently at her mother's bosom. Discreetly, she was being breast-fed by Bacheler, who sat in the City Hall audience. "The bathroom is no place to eat," said Bacheler, 28, of Lawndale, who was among a dozen women holding small children at yesterday's City Council hearing on the right to breast-feed in public. "I wouldn't eat there and have my baby eat there. " If an ordinance that is to come before the City Council next week wins approval, Bacheler and other women in Philadelphia will no longer feel compelled to breast-feed in a restroom or other area out of public view.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Christine Baldwin of Elmer, N.J., the moments after she gave birth three weeks ago to son William Joseph were filled with emotion. Later, as she recovered at Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury, she said, she had a "ton of questions," especially about breast-feeding. "I wanted to know about how to store milk, how long it's good for," she said. "I had questions about the transition between [breast-feeding] and the bottle, and how to handle that. " That is where Gail Hankel comes in. Hankel is a board-certified lactation consultant, a nurse trained in breast-feeding.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six-month-old Natalie Kurtz, barely waking from a nap, whimpered softly and nuzzled at her mother's shirt. "I have a whole system here," Donna Kurtz said, settling into a comfortable chair in her Havertown living room as she unfastened her nursing bra and lifted her bright red sweater for the baby. Natalie opened and closed her tiny hand on Kurtz's sweater as she sucked sleepily. Minutes later, she drifted off again, her tiny lips pressed softly on her mother's breast. Kurtz, a former schoolteacher, remembered the first time she nursed Natalie.
NEWS
December 8, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A government-funded advertising campaign to encourage breast-feeding is being toned down and postponed amid criticism that the ads make unproven medical claims and use scare tactics. The leading critics are the makers of infant formula, a multibillion-dollar industry. Complaints also have come from officials at the American Academy of Pediatrics, a group that staunchly promotes breast-feeding and drew fire in 1997 for urging new mothers to commit to the practice for at least a year.
LIVING
September 2, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baby dolls have come a long way. They cry. They babble. They crawl. Heck, they even pee - and poop. Now, here comes Beb? Glot?n, one of the newest to join the babes in toyland. Unlike the others, this cutie out of Spain doesn't have its own tiny plastic bottle. Beb? Glot?n breast-feeds. Touted as a first, BG has sparked a tantrum-sized controversy, particularly Stateside, over its virtues as a plaything. "Just ick," said one Twitterer. "Incredibly creepy," said another posting.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stopping the spread of the AIDS virus from poor women in developing countries to their newborns will not be as simple as giving them a cheap course of anti-AIDS medicines around the time of birth. New studies being presented at the 13th International AIDS Conference now meeting in Durban, South Africa, show that even if the drugs allow a baby to escape infection at birth, the child can still acquire the virus later on through breast-feeding. But infant formula, the only alternative to breast-feeding, carries its own problems in the Third World: It's expensive, it requires clean water, and it often goes against cultural mores.
NEWS
September 23, 2005
SO NOW Christine Flowers has an issue with women breast-feeding in public (Sept. 19)? She has an awful lot to say about what mothers shouldn't do considering that she has no children. She has a problem with breast-feeding in public? I have a real problem with her holier-than-thou judgmental attitude being expressed in public. Christine, breast-feeding is a very natural thing. Too bad if you don't like it. Donna Di Giacomo, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pregnant with her first child, Sharon Lentz went to a La Leche League meeting, where she just sat on the edge of her chair and cried. The Bensalem woman was 35, seven months pregnant, and felt incompetent in the face of the enormous job of mothering, let alone breast-feeding. "They supported my decision and gave me knowledge [about breast-feeding]," she said of the group members. "It can be very intimidating not having experience with women who nursed. " Started by seven young breast-feeding mothers at a church picnic in Illinois, the international breast-feeding organization La Leche - Spanish for the milk - celebrated its 40th anniversary yesterday.
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