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Breast Milk

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NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
She has pumped breast milk in strange restrooms and at filling stations, at fires, in the emergency medical treatment unit at a disaster. For two years, Marjorie Margolies, a reporter for the NBC affiliate WRC-TV in Washington, who also does special reports for The Today Show, followed the same pattern. She was affectionately dubbed "the real dairy queen" by her camera crew. But providing breast milk for her child even though she was working was important to her, so Margolies always carried a small styrofoam beer container packed with icy blue freezing units, a breast pump and little jars.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's plenty of evidence that a mother's breast milk is better for babies than formula, but a new study makes it clear that women who buy human milk for their babies on the Internet may be getting more than they bargained for. The study, published Monday in Pediatrics, found that nearly three-quarters of 101 milk samples purchased by Ohio researchers had high levels of bacteria, including gram-negative forms such as salmonella that are associated with...
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynn Heinisch says her infant son's life was saved by mothers' milk - other mothers' milk. Heinisch wasn't producing enough breast milk for Liam, and formula made him horribly sick. At 4 months, he weighed a skeletal eight pounds. So Heinisch, who lives in Croydon, turned to friends and the Internet, tapping a trend that proponents see as well-informed wet-nursing in a wired world - and public health officials call risky. "At first, my pediatrician was concerned.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the well-established health benefits of breast-feeding for children, Philadelphia remains a laggard in its practice. Only 29 percent of the city's mothers are still breast-feeding six months after childbirth, according to Esther Chung, professor of pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College. That is the lowest rate among the nation's 10 largest cities, and 11 percentage points below the national average. Wednesday, the city government took a small step to rectify those figures by mandating that employers provide breast-feeding employees a private, sanitary space and the necessary time to express breast milk.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
LONDON STUDY LINKS HIGHER IQS TO BREAST MILK Children who were fed breast milk scored significantly higher on IQ tests than children who received formula only, according to a study of 300 premature children. The study is not definitive proof, but "very strong evidence," that an as-yet-unidentified substance in breast milk affects mental development, said Dr. Alan Lucas, the researcher and head of Infant and Child Nutrition at the Medical Research Council's Dunn Nutrition Unit in Cambridge.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT WAS A breast-feeding mother who suffered the judgment of others that led to legislation signed into law yesterday giving working moms a leg up. Councilman David Oh sponsored the bill after representing a woman who had a baby and returned to work but wanted to pump breast milk, which her employer allowed. But, Oh said, "she was harassed [by colleagues] to the point where she was driven to quit her job. "There's no reason why she should have been harassed and not allowed to express milk," Oh said of the case, which he handled as a lawyer before being elected to office.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
BRAIN FOOD? Mothers, take note: Children who were fed breast milk scored significantly higher on IQ tests than children who received only formula, according to a British study of 300 prematurely born children. The study, reported in the British medical journal the Lancet, is not definitive proof, but "very strong evidence" that an as-yet-unidentified substance in breast milk affects mental development, says researcher Alan Lucas, head of infant and child nutrition at the Medical Research Council's Dunn Nutrition Unit.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You might say that David Kyle went from the Milky Way to mother's milk. His journey started with NASA, which in the early 1980s wanted to develop food and oxygen sources for space stations on Mars and the moon. The agency turned to Kyle and his colleagues, who at the time were researchers in the Martek division of Martin Marietta Corp. The scientists looked for simple life-forms that could be grown easily and in large quantities. They settled upon microalgae, tiny plants found in soil and water.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Cow antibodies in women's breast milk appear to be a culprit in colic, researchers in St. Louis say. Pediatricians have long suspected that infant formula contained cow proteins that cause colic, but they believed those proteins were destroyed in the digestive systems of women who consumed dairy products. In the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine researchers report that the antibodies are destroyed in most women. But in perhaps 20 percent, the antibodies survive and are transmitted to nursing babies.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of women who breast-feed their babies has declined dramatically in the United States, dropping 16 percent in the last decade, a new national study has found. In 1989, it found, just over half of all of America's infants - 52 percent - received some breast milk, compared with 62 percent during the country's most recent breast-feeding peak in 1982. The downward trend, reported in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics, occurred among all groups of new mothers but was particularly evident among those who were black, young or poor.
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NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT WAS A breast-feeding mother who suffered the judgment of others that led to legislation signed into law yesterday giving working moms a leg up. Councilman David Oh sponsored the bill after representing a woman who had a baby and returned to work but wanted to pump breast milk, which her employer allowed. But, Oh said, "she was harassed [by colleagues] to the point where she was driven to quit her job. "There's no reason why she should have been harassed and not allowed to express milk," Oh said of the case, which he handled as a lawyer before being elected to office.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the well-established health benefits of breast-feeding for children, Philadelphia remains a laggard in its practice. Only 29 percent of the city's mothers are still breast-feeding six months after childbirth, according to Esther Chung, professor of pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College. That is the lowest rate among the nation's 10 largest cities, and 11 percentage points below the national average. Wednesday, the city government took a small step to rectify those figures by mandating that employers provide breast-feeding employees a private, sanitary space and the necessary time to express breast milk.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is creating a regional stockpile of a precious pediatric medicine that is in chronic shortage. We're talking about human breast milk. At Children's, "human milk is not viewed as food but as a medical intervention," said Diane L. Spatz, director of lactation. "The immunological and anti-inflammatory properties of human milk are especially important for critically ill infants" in intensive care. Such babies are susceptible to a potentially deadly intestinal inflammation that breast milk helps to prevent - and that baby formula can promote.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's plenty of evidence that a mother's breast milk is better for babies than formula, but a new study makes it clear that women who buy human milk for their babies on the Internet may be getting more than they bargained for. The study, published Monday in Pediatrics, found that nearly three-quarters of 101 milk samples purchased by Ohio researchers had high levels of bacteria, including gram-negative forms such as salmonella that are associated with...
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
THE WEEK in Tattle was interrupted by our nation's birthday.   Friday 50 Cent 's ex-girlfriend/baby mama accused him of wrecking her condo and kicking her. He denied it. But police estimated that someone did around $7,000 worth of damage. Tattle Comics Guy Jerome Maida spoke with Marvel guru Stan Lee in New York and Stan said that Marvel's Phase Three movies, kicking off in 2016 or so, might include Black Panther and Dr. Strange. Kerry Washington ("Scandal")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I'm a new mom of a pretty fun but challenging 6-month-old boy. I am a naturally decisive person; however, the anxiety I'm feeling over making the "right" decisions or providing him the "right" things has been difficult to cope with. For example, since I've gone back to work, I haven't been able to pump enough milk and I've needed to start supplementing with formula. I intellectually know this is fine and many babies have formula, but for some reason I'm beating myself up over it. Why can't I produce enough milk, why can't I provide what I'm supposed to for him, etc.?
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Breast-fed babies up to 6 months old get enough milk, and growth is normal While the World Health Organization recommends that mothers give their babies nothing but breast milk for the first six months, most moms start to supplement with other foods by then, in part because they feel they are not producing enough milk. They needn't worry, according to a study in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics. On average, infants who were exclusive breast-feeders continued to drink more as they got older - about 2 pounds a day at 15 weeks and 2.2 pounds at 25 weeks - and their growth rates were normal.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynn Heinisch says her infant son's life was saved by mothers' milk - other mothers' milk. Heinisch wasn't producing enough breast milk for Liam, and formula made him horribly sick. At 4 months, he weighed a skeletal eight pounds. So Heinisch, who lives in Croydon, turned to friends and the Internet, tapping a trend that proponents see as well-informed wet-nursing in a wired world - and public health officials call risky. "At first, my pediatrician was concerned.
NEWS
May 21, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Howard P. Thomas Jr., 91, a physician in Telford for 40 years and former chief of pediatrics at Grand View Hospital in Sellersville, died of pneumonia May 4 at North Penn Hospital in Lansdale. Dr. Thomas grew up in Media and graduated from Westtown Friends School. He earned a bachelor's degree from Haverford College and a master's degree in chemistry at Johns Hopkins University, where he met a nursing student, Sally Shepherd. They married in 1943. After receiving a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, he interned at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and completed a surgical residency at Chester County Hospital before serving in the Army Medical Corps.
NEWS
November 5, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Too much, mom CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa - A woman who doesn't want her breast milk to go to waste has taken out a newspaper ad in hopes of selling it. Martha Heller, 22, was offering 100 ounces of her breast milk for $200 or best offer. She said her freezer is overflowing with breast milk she has pumped since August and her 4-month-old daughter won't drink from a bottle. A better blood thinner, but not without serious risks ORLANDO, Fla. - A new blood thinner proved better than Plavix, one of the world's top-selling drugs, at preventing heart problems after procedures to open clogged arteries, doctors reported yesterday.
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