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Breast Reconstruction

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NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Some call it the "icing on the cake. " Others deem it the "illusion of a protrusion. " But for Patricia Missiras, 57, of Brookhaven, having 3-D areolas and nipples tattooed to her reconstructed breasts goes much deeper. It's part of her quest to put her bilateral mastectomy, chemo, and radiation firmly in the rear-view mirror. "I want to look as normal as I did before," she says. "I know it's not going to look exactly the same, but I want to get back to where I was before all of this happened.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Northampton, Bucks County, woman whose double mastectomy was shown live on the Internet last year will undergo the final phase of breast reconstruction surgery in a procedure to be carried live online today. Patti Derman, 47, will undergo nipple reconstruction surgery during an operation at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown. The procedure will be Derman's third since she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998 and the second to be shown on the Internet. The 2 1/2-hour procedure will be shown beginning at 11 a.m. today at www.thehealthnetwork.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
HOT STUFF. Fireplaces are hot. Sixty-two percent of the single-family houses built in 1987 have fireplaces, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In a survey in the October issue of Remodeling magazine, the addition of an energy-efficient fireplace was one of the most popular and profitable remodeling options at resale time. BREAST RECONSTRUCTION. Ten years ago, if a woman told her doctor she wanted breast reconstruction after a mastectomy, the response was generally, "Don't be ridiculous.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A double mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery will be shown live over the Internet tomorrow morning from an operating room at the St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne. At 11 a.m., two surgeons will operate on a 47-year-old mother and registered nurse who has been diagnosed with early-stage, non-invasive breast cancer and opted to undergo a mastectomy. The patient, Patti Derman, of Holland, Pa., agreed to have her surgery broadcast over the Internet because of the educational awareness that will result, she said.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Informed care ABC News correspondent Amy Robach's recent courageous decision to undergo mastectomy and breast reconstruction highlights an important shift in our national dialogue on breast cancer. In addition to screening and prevention, we are now experiencing much-needed discussion about healing and survival, with the empowerment of women from diagnosis to recovery at the heart of this conversation. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons emphasizes that breast cancer care includes, at minimum, a surgeon, oncologist, plastic surgeon, radiologist, and gynecologist.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Karin Risi celebrated one year free of cancer on June 12, and she has $200,000 in medical bills to prove it. Risi, principal and head of Vanguard Group's retail-advice services, underwent a mastectomy after being found to have breast cancer last year. Her medical journey prompted her to examine breast cancer from a financial perspective. When the actress Angelina Jolie underwent a stunningly expensive medical procedure - a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction - women everywhere began thinking about the most difficult financial decision they might ever make.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | BY BARBARA DELUCA
Eight years ago, I learned I had lobular carcinoma in-situ, one of 20 types of breast cancer. Despite my background as a health-care marketer, I felt lost in a strange world. Yet I was able to choose a female breast surgeon who became my partner through the process. I had breast reconstruction available that allowed me to retain my femininity. After my surgery, I started asking questions about why lawmakers, researchers and the media had missed the soaring incidence of breast cancer.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Gloria Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
My cousin Gail Katz could have told me how surgery and chemotherapy saved her life. Instead, she told me how breast reconstruction saved her soul. Gail was 42 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer for the first time. The tumor was small, a bit over one centimeter, and had not spread to her lymph nodes. But because she was relatively young, her doctor recommended chemotherapy and radiation after her lumpectomy. During the next several years, Gail's mother and maternal aunt were diagnosed with the same condition, which prompted Gail's visit to a genetics counselor and subsequent genetic testing.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System and Lancaster General Health announced an alliance Tuesday that could increase Penn's share of patients who need the most complex levels of care. "That's not going to happen in one day," said Ralph W. Muller, chief executive of the Penn health system. "These are patients who are now going to Jefferson, they are going to Hopkins, they are going to Penn State, and other areas. Over a period of time, more of those patients will come to Penn, and that does benefit us. " A financial benefit to Lancaster General could be better pricing at Penn for high-level treatments and procedures, such as heart transplants, said Thomas E. Beeman, president and CEO of Lancaster General.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Breast cancer, a terrifying disease for any woman, can be even more so for women whose cultural beliefs get in the way of prompt diagnosis and treatment. That's why Latina breast cancer survivors from the Philadelphia area have teamed up with Living Beyond Breast Cancer, a nonprofit organization based in Ardmore, to create an educational guide. The bilingual, 80-page, paperback book We Celebrate Tomorrow: Latinas Living Beyond Breast Cancer (Celebramos el Mana?a: Latinas que Sobrevivien el C?ncer del Seno)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiffany Nardella was engaged to be married, living in South Philadelphia, and loving life when she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 35 in 2010. The cancer stuck around, but the boyfriend didn't - gone after the second chemo treatment. "My experience with the breakup, cancer, chemo, and trying to work, pay my mortgage, take care of my house and myself while living alone was daunting and overwhelming," Tiffany said. "I went through a bad period of depression and feeling worthless.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System and Lancaster General Health announced an alliance Tuesday that could increase Penn's share of patients who need the most complex levels of care. "That's not going to happen in one day," said Ralph W. Muller, chief executive of the Penn health system. "These are patients who are now going to Jefferson, they are going to Hopkins, they are going to Penn State, and other areas. Over a period of time, more of those patients will come to Penn, and that does benefit us. " A financial benefit to Lancaster General could be better pricing at Penn for high-level treatments and procedures, such as heart transplants, said Thomas E. Beeman, president and CEO of Lancaster General.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Informed care ABC News correspondent Amy Robach's recent courageous decision to undergo mastectomy and breast reconstruction highlights an important shift in our national dialogue on breast cancer. In addition to screening and prevention, we are now experiencing much-needed discussion about healing and survival, with the empowerment of women from diagnosis to recovery at the heart of this conversation. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons emphasizes that breast cancer care includes, at minimum, a surgeon, oncologist, plastic surgeon, radiologist, and gynecologist.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Some call it the "icing on the cake. " Others deem it the "illusion of a protrusion. " But for Patricia Missiras, 57, of Brookhaven, having 3-D areolas and nipples tattooed to her reconstructed breasts goes much deeper. It's part of her quest to put her bilateral mastectomy, chemo, and radiation firmly in the rear-view mirror. "I want to look as normal as I did before," she says. "I know it's not going to look exactly the same, but I want to get back to where I was before all of this happened.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Karin Risi celebrated one year free of cancer on June 12, and she has $200,000 in medical bills to prove it. Risi, principal and head of Vanguard Group's retail-advice services, underwent a mastectomy after being found to have breast cancer last year. Her medical journey prompted her to examine breast cancer from a financial perspective. When the actress Angelina Jolie underwent a stunningly expensive medical procedure - a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction - women everywhere began thinking about the most difficult financial decision they might ever make.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Gloria Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
My cousin Gail Katz could have told me how surgery and chemotherapy saved her life. Instead, she told me how breast reconstruction saved her soul. Gail was 42 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer for the first time. The tumor was small, a bit over one centimeter, and had not spread to her lymph nodes. But because she was relatively young, her doctor recommended chemotherapy and radiation after her lumpectomy. During the next several years, Gail's mother and maternal aunt were diagnosed with the same condition, which prompted Gail's visit to a genetics counselor and subsequent genetic testing.
NEWS
February 25, 2008 | By Grace-Marie Turner
Imagine if the government passed a law requiring that any automobile sold in the United States had to be outfitted with a GPS navigation system, satellite radio, heated leather seats, and a hybrid engine. Such a scenario would mean, of course, that only the wealthy would be able to afford cars. Sound far-fetched? In the lunatic world of America's health insurance market, though, this kind of political micromanagement is a troubling reality. And it is a primary reason many people can't afford health insurance.
NEWS
October 2, 2007 | By JOSH GOLDSTEIN Inquirer Staff Writer
The Story So Far: Nadia Kadi, a 17-month-old from Doylestown, underwent a liver transplant. But now she's rejecting the new organ. Meanwhile, her doctor, Elizabeth Rand, has started treatment for breast cancer. ELIZABETH RAND KNEW she should go home. Just 13 days earlier she'd had a mastectomy, reconstructive surgery and a breast reduction. The last of five surgical drains had just been removed during a postoperative checkup at HUP - the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Breast cancer, a terrifying disease for any woman, can be even more so for women whose cultural beliefs get in the way of prompt diagnosis and treatment. That's why Latina breast cancer survivors from the Philadelphia area have teamed up with Living Beyond Breast Cancer, a nonprofit organization based in Ardmore, to create an educational guide. The bilingual, 80-page, paperback book We Celebrate Tomorrow: Latinas Living Beyond Breast Cancer (Celebramos el Mana?a: Latinas que Sobrevivien el C?ncer del Seno)
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Northampton, Bucks County, woman whose double mastectomy was shown live on the Internet last year will undergo the final phase of breast reconstruction surgery in a procedure to be carried live online today. Patti Derman, 47, will undergo nipple reconstruction surgery during an operation at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown. The procedure will be Derman's third since she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998 and the second to be shown on the Internet. The 2 1/2-hour procedure will be shown beginning at 11 a.m. today at www.thehealthnetwork.
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