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Breathalyzer

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NEWS
December 31, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Staff Writer
IT'S ALL HAPPENING so fast. Just three years ago, marijuana was illegal for recreational use nationwide. That changed when voters in Colorado and Washington legalized it in 2012. Oregon, Alaska. and the District of Columbia passed similar legislation last year. Philadelphia has reduced possession of a small amount of marijuana to a $25 citation, and Mayor-elect Jim Kenney - South Philly Mummer turned pot-friendly progressive - has said he would like to eliminate weed citations altogether.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A New Jersey Superior Court judge threw out two drunken-driving convictions yesterday, ruling that widely used breath tests are highly inaccurate and raising questions about the prosecution of such cases in Burlington County. In overturning the two convictions and referring two others back to municipal courts, Judge Martin L. Haines cited evidence from experts that the field test, known as a Breathalyzer, can be off by as much as 50 percent. Three of the cases were on appeal from Medford Municipal Court; one was from Burlington Township.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Fieldsboro Mayor Edward G. Tyler has lost his bid to have a Burlington County judge overturn his conviction for failing to take a Breathalyzer test. Superior Court Judge Martin L. Haines, in a ruling released yesterday, said the state law governing Breathalyzer tests is constitutional and that Tyler did not have the right to consult with a lawyer before he took the test. Haines also wrote in his opinion that anyone who drives on a public highway has, in effect, consented to take a Breathalyzer test if police require one. Tyler's attorney, William E. Sitzler, said that Tyler intended to appeal Haines' ruling.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next fall, high school students here will have a new test to worry about. A Breathalyzer test. Residents of Sayville, a tidy village on Long Island's south shore, like to think of their community as almost problem-free. But when scores of students showed up drunk at a high school dance in March, some started to worry. School officials did more, formulating a plan to conduct alcohol checks with a Breathalyzer at the beginning of each school day. Under the planned policy, starting in September a student whose breath or behavior raises suspicion will be told to take the test.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | By Will Van Sant and Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Suspected drunk drivers in New Jersey soon will have to blow into a testing device that represents a switch to new technology for the first time in decades. The state Attorney General's Office plans to abandon Breathalyzer methods, invented in 1953, for a roadside tester that uses more sophisticated means to determine whether and how much drivers have been drinking. The pilot program begins Monday as the first new unit - called the Alcotest 7110 - in the state is scheduled to arrive at the Pennsauken Police Department in Camden County.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
To lengthen the list of people arrested for drunken driving and shorten the list of those killed by drunk drivers, a local Mothers Against Drunk Driving chapter last week urged the use of a new breath-alcohol tester in New Jersey. The new tester, called the Intoxilyzer, uses infrared technology to measure the alcohol in a person's blood by analyzing a breath sample blown into the machine. New Jersey is one of four states that do not use infrared testers such as the Intoxilyzer, said Bob Gratz, sales manager for CMI of Owensboro, Ky., maker of the Intoxilyzer.
SPORTS
December 23, 2003 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flyers winger Donald Brashear was charged with drunken driving after being pulled over early Friday in Waterford Township, Camden County, police said. Brashear is slated to appear Jan. 8 in Waterford Township Municipal Court to answer charges of driving while intoxicated, careless driving, and refusing to take a Breathalyzer test, according to Sgt. Dan Cormaney of the Waterford Police Department. Cormaney said last night that Brashear was arrested at 3:01 a.m. Friday when his black 2002 Ford pickup was stopped after it was seen swerving while leaving a shopping center.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writerdeanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
STATE REP. Cherelle L. Parker (D, Phila.) was convicted of driving under the influence Wednesday morning and was sentenced to three days in county jail and suspension of her driver's license for a year. Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge S. Gerald Corso, who was assigned to the case by the Attorney General's Office, made the ruling in Municipal Court. Parker's attorney, Joseph Kelly, left the courtroom proclaiming Parker's innocence and pledging to appeal the ruling, which would set off a lengthy process that would keep the lawmaker out of jail until its conclusion.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Rep. Cherelle L. Parker, leader of the city's House delegation in Harrisburg, was found guilty of drunken driving Wednesday for a 2011 incident in which her blood-alcohol level tested at twice Pennsylvania's legal threshold of intoxication. After a brief trial without witnesses in the Criminal Justice Center, the former president judge of Montgomery County Court, S. Gerald Corso, ruled Parker guilty of driving under the influence of alcohol, based on police arrest records, Breathalyzer results, and related documents.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of DUI cases from the first half of 2016 may be adversely affected because Breathalyzer machines used by Philadelphia police were improperly calibrated. The department was notified Wednesday by a private attorney that the police were using calibrations that had legally expired, police spokesman Lt. John Stanford said in a statement Thursday evening. "As a result of this discovery, all instruments were immediately removed from service," properly calibrated, and returned to service the same day, Stanford said.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Staff Writer
IT'S ALL HAPPENING so fast. Just three years ago, marijuana was illegal for recreational use nationwide. That changed when voters in Colorado and Washington legalized it in 2012. Oregon, Alaska. and the District of Columbia passed similar legislation last year. Philadelphia has reduced possession of a small amount of marijuana to a $25 citation, and Mayor-elect Jim Kenney - South Philly Mummer turned pot-friendly progressive - has said he would like to eliminate weed citations altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
"How dry I am, how wet I'll be, if I don't find the bathroom key. " NOT SO very long ago, the urge to go was the first clue that we'd had too much to drink at a bar, party or concert. Other telltale signs? The inability to walk a straight line or finish a thought. And irrepressible laughter when watching an Adam Sandler movie. Then there were the really glum signals - being arrested for DUI or, by far the worst, getting into an accident. That could leave you with a lifetime of regret, expensive legal fees, a suspended license or even jail time.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As commander of the community relations division of the Philadelphia Police Department in the early 1980s, E. Robert Korn enjoyed not only dealing with law-abiding citizens, but also at times being a face of the city, his son Warren said. "He got to travel on behalf of the city as a representative of the Police Department," his son said. One of Mr. Korn's favorite memories was briefing crew members of the aircraft carrier Saratoga at its port near Jacksonville, Fla., in the early 1980s, before joining them on the voyage to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the Saratoga's extensive repairs.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania State Police have temporarily suspended use of breathalyzer machines in drunken-driving cases because of a judge's concern about accuracy. A judge in Dauphin County recently tossed out several DUI cases after learning that the manufacturer of a widely used breathalyzer - the Intoxilyzer 5000EN - had omitted a state requirement to have a liquid solution tested by independent labs. "The judge ruled that could potentially make the samples no good," state police spokesman Adam Reed said.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
STATE REP. Cherelle L. Parker was convicted Wednesday morning of driving under the influence and was sentenced to three days in county jail and suspension of her driver's license for a year. Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge S. Gerald Corso made the ruling in Philadelphia Municipal Court. Parker's attorney, Joseph Kelly, left the courtroom proclaiming Parker's innocence and pledging to appeal the ruling, which would set off a lengthy process that would keep the lawmaker out of jail until its conclusion.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Rep. Cherelle L. Parker, leader of the city's House delegation in Harrisburg, was found guilty of drunken driving Wednesday for a 2011 incident in which her blood-alcohol level tested at twice Pennsylvania's legal threshold of intoxication. After a brief trial without witnesses in the Criminal Justice Center, the former president judge of Montgomery County Court, S. Gerald Corso, ruled Parker guilty of driving under the influence of alcohol, based on police arrest records, Breathalyzer results, and related documents.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Matt Katz, and Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Gloucester County assemblyman arrested on a charge of drunken driving Tuesday after declining to take a breath test has advocated for several bills that focus on driving while intoxicated, including one dealing with the illegality of refusing a breath test. Democratic Assemblyman Paul Moriarty said Wednesday he "didn't realize the consequences of not taking the Breathalyzer. " After passing a field sobriety test, he said, he declined the Breathalyzer because he thought he "was being railroaded" and had been denied access to his attorney.
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