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Breathing

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NEWS
February 9, 1987
This may come as a surprise, but City Council has almost done something right. The trash-to-steam plant bill has been moved from the Rules Committee, and could come before the full Council for a vote in two weeks. That in itself is reason for celebration - especially after eight months of David Cohen trying to convince the world the trash-to-steam proposal amounted to cooking nuclear waste in an open pit outside South Philadelphia day care centers. There are legitimate health and safety concerns about burning millions of tons of trash within breathing distance of residential areas.
LIVING
April 12, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
It's as easy as breathing, the old saying goes. But breathing isn't as simple as you might think, especially during intense activity. In fact, when we're in the midst of an intense workout, we tend to forget how to do the little things, such as breathing properly. In an age in which athletes are trained to perform to their utmost, it seems strange to place a task as simple as breathing on their training agendas. But improper breathing has caused many a competitor to drop out of a match or to fall short of potential.
NEWS
July 31, 1998
Everybody is in favor of breathing, right? That's why so many people in the world take an interest in preserving the Amazon rain forest (most of it in Brazil), the largest single source of oxygen on land. Most Americans don't realize, though, how preserving the rain forest dovetails with widely unpopular efforts like United States foreign aid. Brazil has agreed with the World Bank and World Wildlife Fund to protect 10 percent of the rain forest by 2000. The carrot part of that equation - World Bank economic support - depends significantly on United States contributions.
LIVING
May 8, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Margarita Rabin's asthma is so bad some days that she heads to the nurse's office as soon as she arrives at Stewart Middle School in Norristown. When the 12-year-old is in gym class or playing basketball, she often has trouble breathing after a few minutes of activity. She is plagued by the attacks even though she takes asthma medicines. "You can't breathe and it makes your chest real tight," Margarita said Thursday as she took part in an asthma screening program in the school auditorium.
NEWS
February 17, 1987
In 1985, the President's Commission on Americans Outdoors was created to recommend ways to meet the nation's future recreational needs. In addition, it was hoped the 15-member commission, which included some western Republicans, would do some image-building for an administration generally regarded as anti- conservation. A draft of the commission's report, released late last year, called on the federal government to spend $1 billion annually - up from the current $20 million - for a trust fund to improve recreational opportunities, acquire public lands and encourage local and state park development.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2003 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bit of a shocker, Sharon Osbourne tells London's Daily Mirror that hubby Ozzy stopped breathing after his quad bike accident Monday. "He had stopped breathing for a minute and a half, and there was no pulse," she said. "But thank God the security guard was there to revive him. He resuscitated him and got him breathing and his pulse going again. " Osbourne, 55, who fractured eight ribs and a neck vertebra, remains on a ventilator. Doctors say he is progressing well, but slowly.
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A tracheotomy is a procedure that is commonly done when severely ill people have problems breathing, said Joseph Spiegel, an otolaryngologist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. It is seen as the most stable way to reestablish breathing in someone with a blockage and may be done either as a planned or emergency procedure. A tube is inserted into a hole cut in the windpipe below the vocal cords. That tube may or may not then be attached to a ventilator, a machine that breathes for the patient.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The word autodidact is not a bad one to describe saxophonist Tim Armacost. As he was being interviewed, Armacost was working on remodeling his home in Manhattan. As has happened in his career as a musician, Armacost had basically learned to do the work himself, but had had a good teacher overseeing him. "I am doing 70 percent of the work myself," Armacost said. "We bought this place three years ago. We were looking for a place that needed work, and we bought this with the idea of doing the work ourselves.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON
MOST PEOPLE recognize pet overpopulation, cruelty and animal fighting as animal-welfare issues, but there's one that many don't think about or may even consider cute. We're talking about extreme physical traits, such as the excessively flat faces seen in many Persian cats, bulldogs, Pekingese, pugs, Boston terriers and other brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds. Snorting and snoring, or the undershot jaw of the bulldog or boxer, are often thought to be endearing characteristics. But when those traits cause animals to gasp for air after minimal exertion, develop heatstroke or even die from exposure to heat and humidity, it's no life for a dog - or cat. It's not great for their humans, either, who pay high veterinary bills to treat their animals or lose them to an early death.
NEWS
February 26, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pope John Paul II is under doctor's orders not to talk, but he is breathing on his own and even writing notes and jokes since his tracheotomy, Vatican officials said yesterday. Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said that contrary to some media reports, the 84-year-old leader of the Roman Catholic Church had never been on a ventilator and that his cardiovascular system had been ruled healthy. Navarro-Valls added that the Pope had been doing well after being released from the Gemelli Polyclinic hospital Feb. 10 - during which time he gave Sunday blessings, met visitors, and released a new book - until he again had trouble breathing Wednesday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
After a long season of events that go to the depths of pretty much everything, from Cold Mountain to Mahler's Symphony No. 8 , Philadelphia classical concertgoers had sounds for sore ears from Dolce Suono Ensemble, which on Tuesday ended its season with Música en tus Manos (Music in Your Hands)/The Americas Project, a buoyant celebration of the Americas, most notably music of Brazil and Peru. It was the closest thing to summer amid what has been a chilly, rainy week. Founder/director Mimi Stillman said her ensemble had never gone this far into popular music, with transcriptions of songs by George Gershwin as well as lesser-known South American songwriters such as Carlos Guastavino and David Haro.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Paul Forfia, For The Inquirer
A 49-year-old woman arrived at the Temple University Hospital emergency room complaining of difficulty breathing, light-headedness when walking, and worsening swelling in her legs. Her breathing was so labored that she had to be examined in a wheelchair. Her medical history included a prior stroke and a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with pulmonary embolism (PE). Deep vein thrombosis occurs when a blood clot forms in one or multiple veins deep in the body, most commonly in the legs.
SPORTS
February 12, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
WE CREATE these games knowing full well that we cannot defeat them. That they will grind us down, suffocate our souls. A sheet of ice, a circular piece of rubber and, 10 moving bodies, two pipes: the variables are endless. When you find yourself on the wrong side of their odds the way R.J. Umberger had - shift after shift, night after night - you sometimes feel as if they will destroy you. Relief. Validation. Maybe a big middle finger to lady luck. That's what you saw Thursday night as Umberger glided into the corner and raised his arms and basked in a catharsis 50 games in the making, the puck sliding to a stop behind the crease, the horn blaring, his teammates swarming.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband has developed a bad case of periodontal disease. I'm afraid to kiss him because I don't want the bacteria causing the disease to spread and his bad breath is unbearable. Our sex life is suffering because of it. We have two beautiful children together, and I love him very much - even if he loses all his teeth at the age of 37. I have explained how extremely important oral hygiene is to overall health, especially heart health, and how his unwillingness to deal with this sends the wrong message to our kids.
NEWS
December 28, 2015
Q: What are aerobic and anaerobic exercises? A: In simple terms, you can breathe easily during aerobic exercise; breathing is harder during anaerobic exercise. Aerobic exercise is low- to moderate-intensity movement that can be sustained for longer periods. You should be able to breathe comfortably and talk without feeling the need to catch your breath. Jogging at a comfortable pace, biking, hiking, and swimming are examples. Aerobic exercise is great for burning fat, strengthening your heart and lungs, and reducing the risk of disease.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Although she needed extra calories, Mingo the malnourished stray could swallow only one piece of kibble at a time after being rescued from the streets of Philadelphia's Frankford section two summers ago. Mingo would also hack after drinking, and her bark became raspy. On antibiotics for what seemed like a routine case of kennel cough, the wire-haired, brindle terrier was plucked from the city shelter by the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), which finds homes for cats and dogs that appear particularly adoptable.
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take a deep breath. How often do you hear someone give that advice for calming down? Maybe you give it to yourself. You may be surprised to learn that a new biofeedback treatment for panic disorder suggests just the opposite. The at-home treatment, which uses a machine called Freespira that measures respiration rate and carbon-dioxide levels in exhaled breath, trains patients to breathe slowly and shallowly, with an emphasis on more complete exhalation than many of us are used to. A small early study found that 68 percent of patients were panic-free a year after training with the device for a month.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IT WAS 2006 - well past the time when Julian Bond could have easily coasted on his laurels as a founding father of the U.S. civil-rights movement who'd fought all the way to the Supreme Court to become one of Georgia's first black lawmakers. But when Bond learned that Pennsylvania was considering a bill to allow interest rates as high as 400 percent on so-called "payday loans," the then-NAACP chairman had to speak up. That's what he always did when he saw a perceived injustice. "Payday lenders prey on poor and working class families, a disproportionate number of whom are African-American, literally stealing money from their victims," Bond wrote to then-Gov.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a week, more than 36,000 Philadelphia public housing residents will be asked to take their cigarettes outside, an unprecedented bid to try to improve the health of some of the city's neediest tenants. Officials wondering about the new smoking ban's potential for success can look to the west. Two years ago, Chester County's housing authority started a strict policy to curb smoking among tenants: No tobacco use anywhere on its properties. It was the first housing agency in Southeastern Pennsylvania to go smoke-free.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON
MOST PEOPLE recognize pet overpopulation, cruelty and animal fighting as animal-welfare issues, but there's one that many don't think about or may even consider cute. We're talking about extreme physical traits, such as the excessively flat faces seen in many Persian cats, bulldogs, Pekingese, pugs, Boston terriers and other brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds. Snorting and snoring, or the undershot jaw of the bulldog or boxer, are often thought to be endearing characteristics. But when those traits cause animals to gasp for air after minimal exertion, develop heatstroke or even die from exposure to heat and humidity, it's no life for a dog - or cat. It's not great for their humans, either, who pay high veterinary bills to treat their animals or lose them to an early death.
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