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Breathing

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NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON
MOST PEOPLE recognize pet overpopulation, cruelty and animal fighting as animal-welfare issues, but there's one that many don't think about or may even consider cute. We're talking about extreme physical traits, such as the excessively flat faces seen in many Persian cats, bulldogs, Pekingese, pugs, Boston terriers and other brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds. Snorting and snoring, or the undershot jaw of the bulldog or boxer, are often thought to be endearing characteristics. But when those traits cause animals to gasp for air after minimal exertion, develop heatstroke or even die from exposure to heat and humidity, it's no life for a dog - or cat. It's not great for their humans, either, who pay high veterinary bills to treat their animals or lose them to an early death.
NEWS
February 9, 1987
This may come as a surprise, but City Council has almost done something right. The trash-to-steam plant bill has been moved from the Rules Committee, and could come before the full Council for a vote in two weeks. That in itself is reason for celebration - especially after eight months of David Cohen trying to convince the world the trash-to-steam proposal amounted to cooking nuclear waste in an open pit outside South Philadelphia day care centers. There are legitimate health and safety concerns about burning millions of tons of trash within breathing distance of residential areas.
LIVING
April 12, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
It's as easy as breathing, the old saying goes. But breathing isn't as simple as you might think, especially during intense activity. In fact, when we're in the midst of an intense workout, we tend to forget how to do the little things, such as breathing properly. In an age in which athletes are trained to perform to their utmost, it seems strange to place a task as simple as breathing on their training agendas. But improper breathing has caused many a competitor to drop out of a match or to fall short of potential.
NEWS
July 31, 1998
Everybody is in favor of breathing, right? That's why so many people in the world take an interest in preserving the Amazon rain forest (most of it in Brazil), the largest single source of oxygen on land. Most Americans don't realize, though, how preserving the rain forest dovetails with widely unpopular efforts like United States foreign aid. Brazil has agreed with the World Bank and World Wildlife Fund to protect 10 percent of the rain forest by 2000. The carrot part of that equation - World Bank economic support - depends significantly on United States contributions.
LIVING
May 8, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Margarita Rabin's asthma is so bad some days that she heads to the nurse's office as soon as she arrives at Stewart Middle School in Norristown. When the 12-year-old is in gym class or playing basketball, she often has trouble breathing after a few minutes of activity. She is plagued by the attacks even though she takes asthma medicines. "You can't breathe and it makes your chest real tight," Margarita said Thursday as she took part in an asthma screening program in the school auditorium.
NEWS
February 17, 1987
In 1985, the President's Commission on Americans Outdoors was created to recommend ways to meet the nation's future recreational needs. In addition, it was hoped the 15-member commission, which included some western Republicans, would do some image-building for an administration generally regarded as anti- conservation. A draft of the commission's report, released late last year, called on the federal government to spend $1 billion annually - up from the current $20 million - for a trust fund to improve recreational opportunities, acquire public lands and encourage local and state park development.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2003 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bit of a shocker, Sharon Osbourne tells London's Daily Mirror that hubby Ozzy stopped breathing after his quad bike accident Monday. "He had stopped breathing for a minute and a half, and there was no pulse," she said. "But thank God the security guard was there to revive him. He resuscitated him and got him breathing and his pulse going again. " Osbourne, 55, who fractured eight ribs and a neck vertebra, remains on a ventilator. Doctors say he is progressing well, but slowly.
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A tracheotomy is a procedure that is commonly done when severely ill people have problems breathing, said Joseph Spiegel, an otolaryngologist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. It is seen as the most stable way to reestablish breathing in someone with a blockage and may be done either as a planned or emergency procedure. A tube is inserted into a hole cut in the windpipe below the vocal cords. That tube may or may not then be attached to a ventilator, a machine that breathes for the patient.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The word autodidact is not a bad one to describe saxophonist Tim Armacost. As he was being interviewed, Armacost was working on remodeling his home in Manhattan. As has happened in his career as a musician, Armacost had basically learned to do the work himself, but had had a good teacher overseeing him. "I am doing 70 percent of the work myself," Armacost said. "We bought this place three years ago. We were looking for a place that needed work, and we bought this with the idea of doing the work ourselves.
NEWS
February 26, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pope John Paul II is under doctor's orders not to talk, but he is breathing on his own and even writing notes and jokes since his tracheotomy, Vatican officials said yesterday. Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said that contrary to some media reports, the 84-year-old leader of the Roman Catholic Church had never been on a ventilator and that his cardiovascular system had been ruled healthy. Navarro-Valls added that the Pope had been doing well after being released from the Gemelli Polyclinic hospital Feb. 10 - during which time he gave Sunday blessings, met visitors, and released a new book - until he again had trouble breathing Wednesday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON
MOST PEOPLE recognize pet overpopulation, cruelty and animal fighting as animal-welfare issues, but there's one that many don't think about or may even consider cute. We're talking about extreme physical traits, such as the excessively flat faces seen in many Persian cats, bulldogs, Pekingese, pugs, Boston terriers and other brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds. Snorting and snoring, or the undershot jaw of the bulldog or boxer, are often thought to be endearing characteristics. But when those traits cause animals to gasp for air after minimal exertion, develop heatstroke or even die from exposure to heat and humidity, it's no life for a dog - or cat. It's not great for their humans, either, who pay high veterinary bills to treat their animals or lose them to an early death.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's something wonderfully preposterous about Showtime's Penny Dreadful , an exciting nouveau-Gothic series about a group of characters from 19th-century novels who band together to fight evil. Eva Green plays the pivotal role of Vanessa Ives, a luscious Catholic sinner and psychic medium whose best friend, Mina Harker (from Bram Stoker's Dracula ) is taken by a devilish vampire-demon known only as the Master. Vanessa joins forces with Mina's father, renowned explorer and mountain climber Sir Malcolm (Timothy Dalton at his virile, thunderous best)
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage and Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was near midnight Tuesday, the election results clear and surprising, when her former college professor sent her a text message: Congratulations Representative White. At 26, an age when many are still living at home with their parents, trying to sort out jobs and careers, Martina White knows exactly where she's headed - to Harrisburg, and a seat in the state House of Representatives. White won a commanding victory in a special election in Northeast Philadelphia's 170th District, becoming the second GOP House member from Philadelphia and the first Republican candidate to win an open seat in 25 years.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At 21 years of age, Ariana Grande - a four-octave light lyric soprano dubbed the "mini-Mariah" - has the world on a string, a notion she blithely, but solidly, embraced while singing and dancing in front of a sold-out crowd at the Wells Fargo Center on Thursday. Grande is a Broadway veteran and has long been a staple of Nickelodeon children's television as Cat Valentine, an adored character in two different series inspiring her young girl fans (and their mothers) to wear lit-up cat ears, just as she does on stage.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
A 57-year-old man came to see me complaining of increasingly severe shortness of breath over the last year and a half. It was worse with exertion and got better with rest, although it never went away completely. He did get a bit short of breath when he tried to lie flat in bed. He had never smoked, he wasn't coughing, he had never had symptoms of asthma before. He did have obstructive sleep apnea and was religiously using his CPAP - a machine that exerts slight airway pressure through a face mask to prevent throat obstructions that interrupt breathing at night.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radiation is a powerful cancer treatment, but protecting healthy tissue from the scatter of damaging rays is challenging. As a result, women who get radiation for cancer in their left breast - which overlaps the heart - have been found to be at increased risk of heart disease and lung cancer. A new study by Thomas Jefferson University researchers confirms that such women can significantly reduce the incidental radiation dose to their hearts with a simple technique: holding their breath.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Dr. Amelia Keaton, For The Inquirer
Jack's cry was so weak that Laura wouldn't have heard it if she hadn't already been awake. Earlier that evening, the new mother had noticed that Jack seemed less interested in nursing, but didn't make much of it. But when she heard his soft cry at 2 a.m., she ran to gather him from his crib. There was something different about this cry, and Laura found Jack limp and struggling to breathe. She immediately woke up her husband, Glenn, and rushed their 2-month-old son to the hospital.
NEWS
December 24, 2014
SIX FAMILY members slaughtered by a Montgomery County man who then took his own life. One hundred forty-three, mostly children, killed in a Pakistan school by the Taliban. One hundred sixty-five children kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram. Two New York police shot in cold blood. And that's just last week. The world is never exactly a sane place, but lately it seems that the madness has increased. Few corners of the world are free from strife, from unbearable tensions.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
HE WAS A 43-year-old married father of six. His alleged crime: selling "loose," untaxed cigarettes on a Staten Island street corner. He was tackled by a gaggle of police officers, including one who subdued him for agonizing seconds with a chokehold, a move that the New York Police Department had outlawed because of its propensity for causing severe injury and death. The entire encounter was captured clearly on video. After Eric Garner did indeed perish in the takedown, a medical examiner classified his death a homicide.
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