CollectionsBreed
IN THE NEWS

Breed

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 29, 1987 | By DICK JERARDI, Daily News Sports Writer
Think breeding is an exact science? "Breed the best to the best and hope for the best" is the old Kentucky axiom. But how about "breed the real good to the awful?" Nonsense, right? Well, not in the case of this year's Kentucky Derby favorite. Demons Begone is by Elocutionist, who won the 1976 Preakness and nine of 12 starts. His mother is Rowdy Angel, who raced 13 times over two years and never won a race. Bill Oppenheim, the editor of Racing Update, a breeding publication based in Lexington, Ky., planned the mating.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Two federal judges had a good look yesterday at Edward "Fast Eddie" Lawlor, a vice president of the Breed, an outlaw motorcycle club, and apparently didn't like what they saw. U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum jailed Lawlor for up to 20 years for trafficking in the drug methamphetamine ("speed") in the Kensington-Fishtown area, and for possession of firearms by a convicted felon. Later, U.S. District Judge Raymond J. Broderick ordered Lawlor to pay about $100,000 to the Internal Revenue Service.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
KENNETH Phillips says the American pit bull terrier wasn't bred to be man's best friend. Maybe he doesn't remember Pete the Pup from the "Little Rascals," or Buster Brown's Tige. Maybe he doesn't know that Helen Keller had one for a seeing-eye dog, or that Teddy Roosevelt had one. He probably doesn't know that this dog's roots are in England, and came over here with the Founding Fathers. Yes, they were bred for aggression, but never, ever against humans. That came when irresponsible and unscrupulous people got their hands on them.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
The merry, affectionate little shih tzu, an Oriental toy dog that, except for a few scattered specimens, has been in America only since the end of World War II, has skyrocketed in popularity to 11th among all breeds registered with the American Kennel Club. More than 40,000 were listed last year, an increase of 122 percent in a decade. A new book on the breed, The Shih Tzu Heritage by Jon Ferrante (Denlinger's Publishers, Box 76, Fairfax, Va. 22030, $39.95 plus $3.05 handling), is dedicated to the Chinese Empress Tzu Hsi, who during her reign, 1861 to 1908, virtually controlled world access to the shih tzu. She adored the breed and insisted that eunuchs assigned to care for the dogs keep immaculate records of pedigrees, breedings, colors and markings.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
The horse's lustrous, raisin-colored coat glistened in the sun as he strode, his head nodding and legs moving in a rapid four-beat gait, around the dirt rectangle at Walker Crossing Stables in rural Limerick Township. One-two-three-four. One-two-three-four. The gelding's hooves moved in rapid succession at the speed of a trot, but he never broke into the common two-beat gait. "That's called overstride," stable owner Julie Bahr, 41, said in a Missouri accent with a hint of Texas.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Civil War history buffs may recall the October morning in 1864 that Gen. Phil Sheridan's troops became nearly overwhelmed in battle at Cedar Creek, Va., while Sheridan, about 20 miles away in Winchester, lounged over breakfast. When the general learned of the attack, he mounted his horse and took off for the battlefield to rally his troops: ". . . And there, through the flush of the morning light, A steed as black as the steeds of night Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight, As if he knew the terrible need; He stretch'd away with his utmost speed; Hills rose and fell; but his heart was gay . . . " The exerpt, from Thomas Buchanan Read's poem about Sheridan's successful ride, and written accounts by eyewitnesses, speak to the stength and stamina of Sheridan's spunky horse, Rienzi, which had been given to the general in 1862.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Cats returns to Philadelphia's Forrest Theater on Thursday, and with it comes the chance to renew acquaintances with a new, younger breed of performer, a breed that has replaced the glamorous musical-comedy stars of the past. The show, booked for eight weeks (it played 16 weeks at the Forrest two seasons ago), comes without a single marquee name, on Broadway as well as on tour. Instead, it depends on an emsemble of 22 young entertainers trained to dance, sing and act, all at the same time.
LIVING
October 4, 1987 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
A dog fancier will have a difficult time choosing which dog show to attend today. There are many of them, including one of the nation's most important shows, the Montgomery County Kennel Club all-terrier feature. That event, held at the Temple University campus, Butler Pike and Meetinghouse Road in Ambler, is the biggest competition in the world for terrier breeds. More than 2,100 dogs from all parts of the United States and Canada are entered this year. Terrier owners consider a win at Montgomery even more important than one at Westminster.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Thomas Hinkle has set up his backyard as the "critter corral. " The fenced-in yard exists solely for the amusement of Erin and Patrick, his two dogs. But not just any dogs. They are cavalier King Charles spaniels, a breed that warmed the laps of English monarchy - most notably Charles II, their namesake king - and now seem to have taken the throne in Caln. As if they knew their elevated status, the tan-and-white toy dogs sit on the family picnic table from time to time and make their presence known by barking at neighbors when the mood strikes.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Nathan Kleinman and Dusty Hinz met during the Occupy movement, camped out on the concrete outside City Hall. Four years later, they're still organizing, but in a more verdant setting: a peaceful patch of farmland off a rutted dirt drive outside Elmer, N.J. Their goal now: Harness the power of the crowd for the future of farming. Their organization, the Experimental Farm Network, aims to connect plant breeders with gardeners and citizen scientists around the world to develop sustainable, perennial food crops that can flourish in the face of climate change.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
With rescue dogs all the rage and shelters overflowing with homeless dogs, it seemed a little ironic to hear veterinarians talk Saturday about how to solve canine fertility problems. But their audience was a serious, sophisticated group of about 40 dog breeders who had traveled from as far away as North Carolina to learn about reproduction, genetics, behavior, and the dog microbiome at a scientific conference at the University of Pennsylvania. Specialized vets now monitor hormones closely to improve the odds of conception.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
YOU'VE PROBABLY seen vintage photos of dogs pulling carts or wagons loaded with milk cans and other goods to market for farmers. Certain breeds specialized in this work, among them Bernese mountain dogs, bouviers des Flandres, great Pyrenees, greater Swiss mountain dogs, Leonbergers, Newfoundlands, Rottweilers and Saint Bernards. Dogs were less expensive to purchase and care for than horses and were sometimes referred to as "the poor farmer's horse. " Some modern dog owners, inspired by their breeds' heritage, are eager to teach their dogs to perform their traditional work.
SPORTS
March 29, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
IT'S QUITE a long way from Honolulu to Houston and from Dec. 7 to April 2. That day in December, Oklahoma beat Villanova, 78-55. It could be a matchup problem as the Sooners are the rare team that can trot out a guard line as good as the Wildcats' and they have a genuine college superstar in Buddy Hield. More likely, it was just circumstance on Pearl Harbor Day and Saturday's Final Four game will play out much differently. OU led that game by 15-3 after 5 minutes. The Wildcats came back to tie it at 26 in the first half, but then got overwhelmed in the second half, 46-29.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
COULD YOU pick out a pit bull from a lineup? You might think so, but there's a good chance you'd be wrong. Even experts have problems when it comes to labeling a breed or mix. That's bad news for dogs who are misidentified, especially if they are in communities with breed-specific legislation - laws that ban certain types of dogs. To test the accuracy of shelter dog identification, University of Florida researchers went to four shelters and asked a total of 16 shelter staff members with at least three years of experience, including four vets, to look at 120 dogs (30 at each shelter)
NEWS
February 7, 2016
* Seven breeds will debut at the 2016 Westminster Kennel Club dog show next week. They are the Bergamasco, a dreadlocked herding breed from the Italian Alps; the berger picard, a French herding breed known for a starring role in the 2005 film "Because of Winn-Dixie"; the boerboel, a giant-size South African guard dog; the cirneco dell Etna, a small Sicilian sighthound; the lagotto Romagnolo, an Italian truffle-hunting breed; the miniature American shepherd,...
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News Staff Writer
AT KENSINGTON Quarters, it's never too early to start talking product. It's the first thing Heather Thomason and Damon Menapace address when they show up in the morning - after coffee, obviously. In many ways, they're no different from any other pair of well-caffeinated co-workers, but the manner of their on-the-job relationship is distinct. Thomason, a butcher, heads up the team milling about the meat-stuffed refrigerator case situated at the very front of the Fishtown restaurant, bar and meat shop, which opened last fall.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
For those preparing to take a test called the SAT (Strange Automotive Trivia), a knowledge of recent BMW nomenclature is essential. Bayerische Motoren Werke has traditionally employed even numbers when identifying coupe models - except when it doesn't. Until recently, the coupe version of the 3 Series sedan had a 3 in its name. But when BMW redesigned the 3 Series for the 2014 model year, it created a 4 Series designation for the coupe and its convertible stablemate. Then, for 2015, it re-muddied the waters by introducing the 4 Series Gran Coupe model that I just tested.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
TANYA BROWN-Dickerson sat listening to her car radio in a Home Depot parking lot when she heard something that sent chills through her. A 26-year-old black man driving a white Dodge Charger had been shot by police during a stop. It took just a few calls to friends and family to confirm that it was her son, Brandon Tate-Brown. That was two months ago. She's since learned little else about her son's death. Yesterday, Brown learned from the Daily News that the police officers involved in the shooting were back on the streets after an internal investigation found that they did not violate departmental policies.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
AH, PENNSYLVANIA. Just when you think the governor's race is shaping up as a staid, boring, G-rated affair, along comes a couple of bizarre, saucy stories of porn. Lord, I love this state. How about the western Pennsylvania lawyer with, um, other acting credits, who appeared in a TV ad promoting Democrat Tom Wolf for governor? Turns out Alan Benyak, of Charleroi, last year played Mr. Cannibal in a flick called "Breeding Farm. " I believe I can state with some confidence that it isn't the best first-date movie.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|