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SPORTS
April 29, 1987 | By DICK JERARDI, Daily News Sports Writer
Think breeding is an exact science? "Breed the best to the best and hope for the best" is the old Kentucky axiom. But how about "breed the real good to the awful?" Nonsense, right? Well, not in the case of this year's Kentucky Derby favorite. Demons Begone is by Elocutionist, who won the 1976 Preakness and nine of 12 starts. His mother is Rowdy Angel, who raced 13 times over two years and never won a race. Bill Oppenheim, the editor of Racing Update, a breeding publication based in Lexington, Ky., planned the mating.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Two federal judges had a good look yesterday at Edward "Fast Eddie" Lawlor, a vice president of the Breed, an outlaw motorcycle club, and apparently didn't like what they saw. U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum jailed Lawlor for up to 20 years for trafficking in the drug methamphetamine ("speed") in the Kensington-Fishtown area, and for possession of firearms by a convicted felon. Later, U.S. District Judge Raymond J. Broderick ordered Lawlor to pay about $100,000 to the Internal Revenue Service.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
KENNETH Phillips says the American pit bull terrier wasn't bred to be man's best friend. Maybe he doesn't remember Pete the Pup from the "Little Rascals," or Buster Brown's Tige. Maybe he doesn't know that Helen Keller had one for a seeing-eye dog, or that Teddy Roosevelt had one. He probably doesn't know that this dog's roots are in England, and came over here with the Founding Fathers. Yes, they were bred for aggression, but never, ever against humans. That came when irresponsible and unscrupulous people got their hands on them.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
The merry, affectionate little shih tzu, an Oriental toy dog that, except for a few scattered specimens, has been in America only since the end of World War II, has skyrocketed in popularity to 11th among all breeds registered with the American Kennel Club. More than 40,000 were listed last year, an increase of 122 percent in a decade. A new book on the breed, The Shih Tzu Heritage by Jon Ferrante (Denlinger's Publishers, Box 76, Fairfax, Va. 22030, $39.95 plus $3.05 handling), is dedicated to the Chinese Empress Tzu Hsi, who during her reign, 1861 to 1908, virtually controlled world access to the shih tzu. She adored the breed and insisted that eunuchs assigned to care for the dogs keep immaculate records of pedigrees, breedings, colors and markings.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
The horse's lustrous, raisin-colored coat glistened in the sun as he strode, his head nodding and legs moving in a rapid four-beat gait, around the dirt rectangle at Walker Crossing Stables in rural Limerick Township. One-two-three-four. One-two-three-four. The gelding's hooves moved in rapid succession at the speed of a trot, but he never broke into the common two-beat gait. "That's called overstride," stable owner Julie Bahr, 41, said in a Missouri accent with a hint of Texas.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Civil War history buffs may recall the October morning in 1864 that Gen. Phil Sheridan's troops became nearly overwhelmed in battle at Cedar Creek, Va., while Sheridan, about 20 miles away in Winchester, lounged over breakfast. When the general learned of the attack, he mounted his horse and took off for the battlefield to rally his troops: ". . . And there, through the flush of the morning light, A steed as black as the steeds of night Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight, As if he knew the terrible need; He stretch'd away with his utmost speed; Hills rose and fell; but his heart was gay . . . " The exerpt, from Thomas Buchanan Read's poem about Sheridan's successful ride, and written accounts by eyewitnesses, speak to the stength and stamina of Sheridan's spunky horse, Rienzi, which had been given to the general in 1862.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Cats returns to Philadelphia's Forrest Theater on Thursday, and with it comes the chance to renew acquaintances with a new, younger breed of performer, a breed that has replaced the glamorous musical-comedy stars of the past. The show, booked for eight weeks (it played 16 weeks at the Forrest two seasons ago), comes without a single marquee name, on Broadway as well as on tour. Instead, it depends on an emsemble of 22 young entertainers trained to dance, sing and act, all at the same time.
LIVING
October 4, 1987 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
A dog fancier will have a difficult time choosing which dog show to attend today. There are many of them, including one of the nation's most important shows, the Montgomery County Kennel Club all-terrier feature. That event, held at the Temple University campus, Butler Pike and Meetinghouse Road in Ambler, is the biggest competition in the world for terrier breeds. More than 2,100 dogs from all parts of the United States and Canada are entered this year. Terrier owners consider a win at Montgomery even more important than one at Westminster.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Thomas Hinkle has set up his backyard as the "critter corral. " The fenced-in yard exists solely for the amusement of Erin and Patrick, his two dogs. But not just any dogs. They are cavalier King Charles spaniels, a breed that warmed the laps of English monarchy - most notably Charles II, their namesake king - and now seem to have taken the throne in Caln. As if they knew their elevated status, the tan-and-white toy dogs sit on the family picnic table from time to time and make their presence known by barking at neighbors when the mood strikes.
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NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
For those preparing to take a test called the SAT (Strange Automotive Trivia), a knowledge of recent BMW nomenclature is essential. Bayerische Motoren Werke has traditionally employed even numbers when identifying coupe models - except when it doesn't. Until recently, the coupe version of the 3 Series sedan had a 3 in its name. But when BMW redesigned the 3 Series for the 2014 model year, it created a 4 Series designation for the coupe and its convertible stablemate. Then, for 2015, it re-muddied the waters by introducing the 4 Series Gran Coupe model that I just tested.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
TANYA BROWN-Dickerson sat listening to her car radio in a Home Depot parking lot when she heard something that sent chills through her. A 26-year-old black man driving a white Dodge Charger had been shot by police during a stop. It took just a few calls to friends and family to confirm that it was her son, Brandon Tate-Brown. That was two months ago. She's since learned little else about her son's death. Yesterday, Brown learned from the Daily News that the police officers involved in the shooting were back on the streets after an internal investigation found that they did not violate departmental policies.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
AH, PENNSYLVANIA. Just when you think the governor's race is shaping up as a staid, boring, G-rated affair, along comes a couple of bizarre, saucy stories of porn. Lord, I love this state. How about the western Pennsylvania lawyer with, um, other acting credits, who appeared in a TV ad promoting Democrat Tom Wolf for governor? Turns out Alan Benyak, of Charleroi, last year played Mr. Cannibal in a flick called "Breeding Farm. " I believe I can state with some confidence that it isn't the best first-date movie.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
IT WAS ALMOST a decade ago, on, yes, a dark and stormy night, when a few dozen animal activists came together to talk about making Philadelphia a "no-kill" city for homeless animals. There was serious talk and a soft goal of 10 years. Everyone went home happy, but with no action plan, just a gauzy expectation that if everyone pulled together, things would change. Things did change. They got worse. Good intentions can't beat bad practices and the city shelter was a house of horrors.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - A state regulation that permits commercial breeding kennels to keep nursing mothers and puppies in mesh-floor cages is not only hazardous for the dogs, it is illegal, according to animal-rights activists. That's the contention at the heart of a lawsuit that pits them against the Commonwealth in the latest development in a long-running battle over what constitutes humane conditions in dog-breeding facilities. Prolonged exposure to wire flooring often leads to severe injuries in dogs, including splayed feet, cysts on paws, and painful abrasions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Walking along the main path at the Philadelphia Zoo, Beth Caruso passed a gift shop and hot dog stand to her left and the First Niagara Big Cat Falls exhibit to her right. But what stopped her in her tracks was overhead. Just 14 feet above, the 320-pound Amur tiger Dimitri loped across the mesh-enclosed Big Cat Crossing - the newest canopy section to open in the innovative $7.7 million Zoo360 trail system. Dmitri then retraced his steps in the 330-foot-long pathway before settling down for a look-see at the agape zoo visitors below.
SPORTS
June 4, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S THE EARS. It's gotta be the ears. You're looking for answers to the riddle of California Chrome, how this humbly bred colt, with its geezer trainer and its loud co-owner and its 42-year-old jockey, wearing the ugliest silks in recent memory, has a chance to make horse racing history, go ahead, start with the ears. Chrome will be odds-on on June 7, in the Belmont. His breeding screams that he can't go a mile-and-a-half against rested rivals. The colt has half-a-ton of skills.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Jay Wright did not build his reputation at Villanova, has not maintained a consistent measure of excellence in his basketball program over the last decade, with players like Darrun Hilliard. Hilliard is a Villanova guard, and for a long time, the term "Villanova guard" has carried a certain connotation, has conjured memories of certain players who played a certain way and fit a certain physical and stylistic profile. When one thinks of a "Villanova guard" during Wright's tenure as head coach, the names are familiar: Randy Foye, Allan Ray, Kyle Lowry, Mike Nardi, Scottie Reynolds, Corey Fisher, Maalik Wayns - none of them taller than 6-foot-4, all of them tougher than goatskin, each a key contributor to a nine-year stretch that saw the Wildcats reach the NCAA tournament eight times, the regional semifinals four times, the regional finals twice, and the Final Four once.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tango is great with kids, but he'll kill their pet guinea pig if you're not careful. He'll break a squirrel's neck and leave the dead animal on the porch for you, too. Low to the ground and boasting dexterous, horselike ears, Portuguese Podengo pequenos like Tango were bred centuries ago in Europe to catch rats on explorers' ships. They are born hunters with type A personalities, at least most of the time. "You move the furniture around and they're mad at you for a week," said Tango's owner, Stacy Faw, of Indiana.
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