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FOOD
October 9, 2008
There's a fine new Italian bean brewing in the local espresso scene now that Massimo Taurisano has traded Northern Italy's Hausbrandt for the slightly darker Miscela d'Oro from Sicily at his six Academia del Caffes and his 400 wholesale clients. The recent roaster change was due to the exchange rate and Miscela's desire for a competitive East Coast presence. The result: a half-pound $10 can, a great alternative to pricier competitors. I've come to love Miscela's more robust and chocolatey brew - first served locally at Osteria.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If most normal humans are made up of nearly 90 percent water, I am at the very least 80 percent coffee. Not only do I drink it from morning to night, loving the hot black spark perking through my body and mind, I've come to savor its myriad roasty flavors, the manual craft of brewing gear, and especially its culture of rituals - which can be oh-so-hard to change. Like most discerning Philadelphians, my ritual for more than a decade has been a cup of La Colombe, the city's "house brew," judging by the number of restaurants and cafes that have a pot of Corsica or shot of Nizza at the ready.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Next time you're sitting at the bar, spacing out as you peel the label off your bottle, consider the breadth of info at your fingertips. Your average beer label is full of facts, both trivial and pertinent. Check out the newest bottle on local shelves, from Yards. Yards Brewing Company is owned by Tom Kehoe and John Bovit, a couple of college buddies who have a thing for British-style ales. The name means nothing - it just sounds kind of English. They sold their first keg on April 18, 1995, and started bottling last month.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages after she claims she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported this morning by the Courthouse News Service.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
A controversial malt liquor was ordered off store shelves by the state police yesterday because the name of the high-alcohol brew violates state law, a state police spokesman said. Colt .45 PowerMaster, manufactured by financially troubled G. Heileman Brewing Co. Inc., of La Crosse, Wis., and distributed by Clement & Muller Inc., of Northeast Philadelphia, was targeted for removal because the name, PowerMaster, connoted the strength of the beverage. That's a violation of the state liquor code, said Lt. John McGeehan, head of the area's state police liquor-control enforcement unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1992 | By Andy Wickstrom, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Because seeing is believing, it would be difficult to find a how-to topic that didn't lend itself to the video format. Producers, recognizing the VCR's value as a teaching tool, have responded with instructional tapes covering the gamut of human activity. They teach skills as basic as dancing, and as complex as tapestry weaving. Video how-tos are so ubiquitous that it seems no topic is too arcane. As evidence of video's ability to plumb the obscure, consider two recent releases - one explains napkin-folding and the other demystifies home brewing.
NEWS
July 27, 1992
At Tau Kappa Epsilon on the Penn State campus in State College, the brothers are probably toasting the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, thanks to a recent decision that got the fraternity off the hook on a a 1986 charge of serving liquor to minors. Unfortunately, the court's 5-2 decision is having a negative impact well beyond Happy Valley. The case involved drinking by minors at a party attended by undercover officers. The state high court overturned the convictions, ruling that chemical analysis, rather than testimony from arresting officers, is necessary to make the rap stick.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | By Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
An 80-year-old Bridesburg woman discovered yesterday that her late husband had left an unsuspected legacy in their basement: chemicals brought home from his job at the nearby Rohm and Haas plant. Police said that Jean Dimperzio, of Stiles Street near Duncan, called authorities about 8 a.m. yesterday to report a strange odor emanating from her house. When police and Fire Department officials arrived, they discovered in the basement a witches' brew of old chemicals that been stewing since the death several years ago of Dimperzio's husband, who worked for the Rohm and Haas facility in Bridesburg, police said.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
DRINK UP, Jersey, it's your 350th birthday. And Flying Fish - the Garden State's largest craft brewery - has brewed a fitting pint for the occasion: NJ350 Anniversary Ale . It's the Camden County brewery's version of a traditional English stock ale (this birthday marks New Jersey's establishment as a British colony, remember), with a brash bite of modern-day American sedition. "The idea was to pay homage to 350 years of history," Flying Fish brewery manager Barry Holsten told me when I stopped by on brew day earlier this month, "so we looked backward and forward.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
With permission granted from our better halves, the only thing cooler than a simple "guys' night out" is a "guys' night" splashed in craft beer. The hardest part in this brew-obsessed region, where the ale flows from South Street to South Jersey in stupefying variety - from hipster gastropubs to Belgian mussel bars, a German brat hall, and even a brunch spot awash in growler drafts - is simply choosing where to begin. Consider it scouting for "girls' night out," too. Great beer is a gift with equal-opportunity appeal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2016
IF THERE IS a local amateur breeding ground for the professional brewers of tomorrow, it could be the six-year-old South Jersey home-brew club with a catchy name. Barley Legal Homebrewers can lay claim to producing no fewer than a dozen full-time brewers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, including several who have opened their own breweries. Think of it as the Silicon Valley of brewing, with malt instead of microchips. Surely other home-brew clubs have their success stories, but I can't name another that has had such a vital, immediate impact on a region's beer scene.
FOOD
June 17, 2016
You remember your father's beer, don't you? Piels, Schmidt's, Ortlieb's. When I asked friends on Facebook recently to name their pop's favorite, they had no problem recalling those days gone by. "Löwenbräu dark for fancy occasions and Budweiser for every day," said Rebekah Nault. "Every Friday afternoon, when I was a kid, a truck would deliver a case of Schmidt's for my parents, and a case of Frank's soda for me and my brothers," said Joe McDonnell. "Colt 45. Dad had soul and said it had 'More Flava!
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Monday suggested that he wasn't ready to support a proposal to revise New Jersey tax policy, including a hefty gas tax hike and phaseout of a levy on estates of the deceased. His remarks came as a coalition of Democratic and Republican lawmakers - backed by organized labor, business, and other groups - heralded the plan as game-changing legislation that would fund critical investments in roads and bridges while also saving taxpayers about $1 billion annually through other policy changes.
FOOD
June 3, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
There is a beauty to the meritocracy of a blind beer tasting. There's no slick marketing to influence decisions. No brand loyalty tugging at judges' sympathies. No extra points for history or the geography of state lines, as this year's winners would prove. At The Inquirer's seventh annual Brew-vitational competition for local beers, our biggest yet with 64 entries from 35 breweries divided into two categories ("new" and "sour"), every beer had an equal opportunity to impress the panel on its own virtues.
FOOD
June 3, 2016
THE CONTENDERS KEY: N = New-Beer category S = Sour Beer category *= Finalist (voted into the final round, shown in bold ) Winners are noted with place in bold. Percentage is alcohol content. IBU = International Bitterness Unit   2nd Story Brewing 117 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, 267-314-5770; 2ndstorybrewing.com N Daisy Point Pils, German Pilsner, 4.7%, 40 IBU N Perpetua Crusher, Session IPA, 4.9%   2SP Brewing Co. 120 Concord Rd., Aston, 484-483-7860; 2spbrewing.com *N Second Place, The Russian, Russian Imperial Stout, 9%, 75 IBU N Bellcracker, Double IPA, 8.2%, 80 IBU   Barren Hill Brewery Lafayette Hill, RECENTLY CLOSED; beer available at Devil's Den, 1148 S. 11th St., Phila.
FOOD
June 3, 2016 | By Craig LaBan
Of the 64 beers from 35 breweries on The Inquirer's tasting table, judges crowned three champs in two categories: the "new" beers of 2016, and "sour" beers in various styles. New Beers 1. Bell Buoy, Belgian Blonde Ale (7.3%), Slack Tide Brewing Co. From one of the newest, smallest breweries, this is a well-made Jersey Shore take on a classic Belgian blonde that the judges found "clean and biscuity" with a lean golden body, good balance, fruity banana and clove notes on the nose, and a nice, grassy hop finish.
FOOD
May 27, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
In Philadelphia's thriving craft-beer scene, where hundreds of bars with formidable tap lists vie for the dollars of discerning drinkers, one of the toughest tasks has become to find a way to stand out. Though competition tends to breed excellence, there's also a by-product: collaboration. Increasingly, Philadelphia bars, stalwarts and upstarts alike, are teaming with brewers to create proprietary products - special beers exclusive to specific venues, often made to the nitty-gritty specifications of the people buying them.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
An affiliate of Philadelphia developer John Wei has purchased the 200,000-square-foot Red Bell Brewing Co. building at 31st and Jefferson Streets in the city's Brewerytown section. Brewerytown Investment L.P. paid $1.85 million this month for the vacant 1870s brewery building on 70,000 square feet of land, according to Ken Wellar, a managing partner at Rittenhouse Realty Advisors, which marketed the property. Brewerytown Investment shares an address with other ventures connected to Wei, whose affiliates also own the Independence Press Building at 525 N. 11th St. and the Church of the Assumption at 1131 Spring Garden St. in the West Poplar neighborhood.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
Much like the tequilas from Siembra Azul, the new line of Siembra Metl mezcals just introduced by David Suro-Piñera's locally based spirits company speak to his love of unique terroir and ancient Mexican artisan techniques. The rapidly growing category of mezcal - a wider family of agave spirits from which tequila sprang - tends to be more rustic and idiosyncratic than the now highly commericalized tequila field. But these bottles from master mescalero Jose Emilio Vieyra Rangel in Michoacán show a little more finesse than some of the campfire-pungent Oaxacan mezcals that first charmed the American market.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
I'm a firm believer that there's no better way to discover a new town than from a bar stool, and that was never better illustrated than my trek last weekend to north-central Pennsylvania. This big-city boy has lived in Philadelphia nearly his entire life, never bothering to venture a mere two hours to the small towns that cling to the Susquehanna River and its western branch. Places like Berwick, Shamokin, and Mifflinburg. But offer me a beer and, well . . . That's the idea behind the River Rat Brew Trail linking nine breweries in Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, and Union Counties - the state's midsection, where old coal mines give way to rolling farms and game lands.
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