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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Is there a more soul-satisfying combination in the edible universe than handmade pizza and beer? I don't think so. And it's a good thing, considering that pizza and beer are pretty much the main attractions on the menu at Mount Airy's funky new Earth Bread + Brewery. Actually, there are also a fresh salad or two, a creamy soup of the day, some mixed olives, and a cheese platter. There is also a surprisingly smart selection of international wines by the glass. But brews and "breads" clearly rule the yeasty ambitions of this welcome new addition to Germantown Avenue, where an igloo-shaped oven in the front blazes ash logs at 700 degrees, and a petite set of brew tanks tucked into the back pumps out some eccentric beers worth driving for. It's a willingness to focus on doing these two things well (even if there's yet some work to do)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Bruce Graham tries something a little different in each successive play that he writes. "Burkie" was his blue-collar comedy and "Early One Evening at the Rainbow Bar and Grill" his end-of-the-world comedy. In "Minor Demons" he tackled straight drama and experimented with a Greek chorus. For "Moon Over the Brewery," which last night opened a world-premiere engagement at the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theatre, he is back in blue-collar land and his chosen form is comedy-fantasy, yet again under the auspices of the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Attorneys for Philadelphia beer baron William H. Pflaumer yesterday asked a federal judge to let Pflaumer out of prison early and place him under "electronically supervised house arrest" inside Schmidt's brewery. This way, Pflaumer could help his ailing brewery survive, receive treatment for a life-threatening heart condition and pay his debt to society by donating time to community service, the lawyers told U.S. District Judge Charles Weiner. Under the proposed house arrest, Pflaumer could work at the brewery in the morning, perform community service from noon to 8 p.m., five days a week, and spend nights and weekends at his "residence within the brewery," the lawyers suggested.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Pflaumer, owner of Christian Schmidt Brewing Co. of Philadelphia, has been granted a furlough from a federal penitentiary in Kentucky in order to return here and negotiate the sale of the city's last independent brewery, reliable sources said yesterday. The sources said Pflaumer is due to return tonight to the Lexington, Ky., prison where he is serving the final two years of a three-year sentence for federal tax evasion. He was convicted in July 1983. Reports of an impending sale of Schmidt have been circulating ever since its controversial owner began to fight the federal charges, which were not related to the company.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Pflaumer, 76, the last of the local beer barons, died of heart failure on Saturday, May 22, at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Pflaumer was a quintessential Philadelphia character widely known as "Billy" or, more grandly, "Billy the Beer King. " The final owner of the brewery that produced Schmidt's - Philadelphia's best-known beer - he was sentenced to federal prison in 1983 for evading more than $125,000 in excise taxes. The Christian Schmidt Brewing Co., between Second and Hancock Streets south of Girard Avenue, was the city's last independent brewery and had been a local institution since 1860.
FOOD
May 15, 1996 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1698, two dozen years before Samuel Adams was born (the patriot, mind you, not the beer label), a mayor in Faversham, Kent, England, set up a brewery over an artesian well. Only last year, the brewery, which later become Shepherd Neame, finally began to export its products to the colonies. Today's beer companies are fond of prattling on and on about all the time it takes to craft a beer. Shepherd Neame, England's longest-operating brewery, could use that excuse to explain why it took nearly three centuries to reach out to Americans.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
It's probably always a risky proposition to go out with an ex, especially if you haven't seen him in a while and there are still some unresolved issues floating around. But it's a much safer proposition if there's good beer in plentiful supply, as there is at Nodding Head Brewery. Nodding Head, which opened in January on the site of the former Samuel Adams Brew House, has become a hangout for the 20something set, drawn by brewmeister Brandon Greenwood's "handcrafted" beers. Greenwood, who earned a beer-making degree in Edinburgh, has done time at breweries in Scotland as well as Stroh's in Minnesota and a stint as head brewer at Philadelphia's Yards Brewing Company.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Schmidt's of Philadelphia could soon be Schmidt's of La Crosse. The G. Heileman Brewing Co., of La Crosse, Wis., said in an announcement yesterday that it has signed a letter of intent to buy some of the beer labels of Philadelphia's C. Schmidt & Sons for a price to be determined later. The deal would mean the city would lose its last brewery. Russell G. Cleary, Heileman chairman, said in a statement that the deal includes Schmidt's inventory but does not include the brewery at 2nd Street and Girard Avenue or its New York beer distributorship.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boston Beer Company Inc., which makes Samuel Adams Boston Lager and other beers, said yesterday that it had agreed to pay $55 million to buy a brewery in Breinigsville, Lehigh County, from Diageo North America. The company said that adding the brewery would increase its annual brewing capacity 1.6 million barrels, and that it could eventually produce 2 million barrels a year, more than doubling Boston Beer's current production. Boston Beer shares closed up $2.26, or 5.5 percent, at $43.32 yesterday on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
You walk the streets of the old neighborhoods and sooner or later you start to hear the sounds of a city's forgotten past. Buried like 300-year-old cobblestones 'neath layers of asphalt, the ghosts are still alive . . . if you know how to listen. In Fairmount, you hear the creaking of a wooden wagon wheel coming down Poplar Street. In Northern Liberties, it's the tapping of a barrel-maker's hammer in the basement of a brick warehouse at 4th and Brown. In Germantown, it's a whistling steam engine that heats a brew kettle.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 27, 2015
THE CRAFT-BEER world's fixation with India Pale Ale shows no sign of fading. Just last month, for example, Philadelphia welcomed a new portfolio from California's Knee Deep Brewing that includes no fewer than five different IPAs, including a double, a triple and a heretofore unknown "Quad IPA. " Which is all perfectly fine if you're a hop addict, craving your next big fix of Simcoe, Citra or some other variety of the famously bitter, aromatic plant....
BUSINESS
January 21, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out to help improve the beer-drinking experience, the Philadelphia life-sciences company Invisible Sentinel Inc. has entered into partnerships with four brewing companies for final validation of its Veriflow brewPAL. The technology by the University City start-up claims to be the first to provide same-day detection of pediococcus and lactobacillus, bacteria that attach to grain and can spoil the taste of beer. Last fall, Invisible Sentinel announced a partnership with Victory Brewing Co. in Downingtown to work on validation of Veriflow brewPAL.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
They might not like Yuengling. But the Teamsters evidently are drunk in love with Gov.-elect Tom Wolf. A day after State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said that Wolf's inauguration planners were excluding Yuengling, the Pottsville-based brew, from his inaugural celebration, the leader of Teamsters Local 830 sent out a news release praising the incoming governor - and teeing off on the brewery's president, Richard Yuengling Jr., whom the union has long described as "anti-worker.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is America's oldest lager non grata to Pennsylvania's newest governor? Yuengling, from the Pottsville-based brewery, appears to have been left off the list of beverages to be served at next week's inauguration for Gov.-elect Tom Wolf. State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said he learned from constituents and others that inauguration planners had specifically declared Yuengling not to be served. Vereb said Thursday he was not sure why, or if Wolf knew, but added that he didn't think it was accidental.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2014
D.G. YUENGLING & Son made it through the Civil War, Prohibition and untold skirmishes with the giants from St. Louis and Milwaukee. But those were nothing like the challenge it faces in the age of endless choice. These days, the shelves are filled with everything from Lime-A-Rita to triple IPA. Samuel Adams has a TV commercial boasting that it makes more than 60 styles. Yuengling, meanwhile, is still plugging away with a portfolio of just seven full-time brands and three seasonals.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
SPLASHING down a cold one in the tasting room at the new Forgotten Boardwalk Brewery, in Cherry Hill, you can't help but wonder: Why wasn't this place built on an actual boardwalk down the Shore? The curved funhouse mirrors, the wheel of fortune, the Skee-Ball machines . . . the only thing missing is the smell of salt air. So, I asked Jamie Queli, the brewery's 30-year-old owner, why she didn't open it in Asbury Park, whose aging, largely vacant boardwalk gave this brewery its name.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
IF STEVE HINDY looks a little uncomfortable on Monday when he and a panel of local brewers gather for a talk about the "craft-beer revolution" at Yards Brewery, don't blame me. The founder of Brooklyn Brewery is an experienced journalist - a former Mideast correspondent for the Associated Press - and he can handle the grilling I'll dole out as moderator of the event. No, if he's squirming in his seat, it's because Philly hasn't always treated him so well. He has bad memories of one guy in particular - the man whom the Inquirer once called "the shadowy lord of the Philadelphia beer business.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014
FOR ALL their innovation, American craft brewers are starting to grow stale. Over-hopped beers? Yeah, they were novel . . . about 15 years ago. Now everyone brews a double IPA. Wacky flavors? Used to be we couldn't wait for pumpkin beer each autumn. Now, because there are so many of them competing for shelf space, the pumpkin season starts in two weeks and you'll be sick of them by Labor Day. Barrel-aged beer? Because it takes months and years to properly age and blend beer, barrel-aged beer was once a rarity.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
  ERIN WALLACE, 36, of Lafayette Hill, owns Devil's Den in South Philadelphia and Old Eagle Tavern in Manayunk. In fall 2013, she opened Barren Hill Tavern & Brewery in the old General Lafayette Inn in Lafayette Hill. Wallace, a native of Baltimore, is one of the few female brewery owners in Philly.   Q: How'd you get into the tavern biz? A: I graduated from Moore College of Art & Design and while I was there I waitressed at Cherry Street Tavern. They offered me some bartending shifts, which led to other roles.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
SUMMER HAS returned and so, I'm surprised to report, have Bavarian-style wheat beers. Surprised because, for a while there, it was looking like American brewers couldn't make a warm-weather refresher that wasn't hopped out the wazoo. Lately, even when the Americans have dabbled in wheat, it was only as a means to unleash yet another hop monster, the so-called white IPA. But as Philly gears up for another run of the three H's - hazy, hot and humid - it can cool down with the fourth H, hefeweizen.
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