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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Is there a more soul-satisfying combination in the edible universe than handmade pizza and beer? I don't think so. And it's a good thing, considering that pizza and beer are pretty much the main attractions on the menu at Mount Airy's funky new Earth Bread + Brewery. Actually, there are also a fresh salad or two, a creamy soup of the day, some mixed olives, and a cheese platter. There is also a surprisingly smart selection of international wines by the glass. But brews and "breads" clearly rule the yeasty ambitions of this welcome new addition to Germantown Avenue, where an igloo-shaped oven in the front blazes ash logs at 700 degrees, and a petite set of brew tanks tucked into the back pumps out some eccentric beers worth driving for. It's a willingness to focus on doing these two things well (even if there's yet some work to do)
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia was once a city of breweries, many of them run by German immigrants who knew their pilsners from their porters. Their stout old buildings have been disappearing as the city's housing boom spreads north into former German neighborhoods. Ortliebs' main brew house, the last in Northern Liberties, went down in 2013. But farther north, several others survive. One of the most evocative is the Weisbrod & Hess brewery on Martha Street in Kensington. Founded in 1882 by two German saloon-keepers, George Weisbrod and Christian Hess, the brewery grew to a full-block complex between Frankford Avenue and the aptly named Amber Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Bruce Graham tries something a little different in each successive play that he writes. "Burkie" was his blue-collar comedy and "Early One Evening at the Rainbow Bar and Grill" his end-of-the-world comedy. In "Minor Demons" he tackled straight drama and experimented with a Greek chorus. For "Moon Over the Brewery," which last night opened a world-premiere engagement at the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theatre, he is back in blue-collar land and his chosen form is comedy-fantasy, yet again under the auspices of the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Attorneys for Philadelphia beer baron William H. Pflaumer yesterday asked a federal judge to let Pflaumer out of prison early and place him under "electronically supervised house arrest" inside Schmidt's brewery. This way, Pflaumer could help his ailing brewery survive, receive treatment for a life-threatening heart condition and pay his debt to society by donating time to community service, the lawyers told U.S. District Judge Charles Weiner. Under the proposed house arrest, Pflaumer could work at the brewery in the morning, perform community service from noon to 8 p.m., five days a week, and spend nights and weekends at his "residence within the brewery," the lawyers suggested.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Pflaumer, owner of Christian Schmidt Brewing Co. of Philadelphia, has been granted a furlough from a federal penitentiary in Kentucky in order to return here and negotiate the sale of the city's last independent brewery, reliable sources said yesterday. The sources said Pflaumer is due to return tonight to the Lexington, Ky., prison where he is serving the final two years of a three-year sentence for federal tax evasion. He was convicted in July 1983. Reports of an impending sale of Schmidt have been circulating ever since its controversial owner began to fight the federal charges, which were not related to the company.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Pflaumer, 76, the last of the local beer barons, died of heart failure on Saturday, May 22, at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Pflaumer was a quintessential Philadelphia character widely known as "Billy" or, more grandly, "Billy the Beer King. " The final owner of the brewery that produced Schmidt's - Philadelphia's best-known beer - he was sentenced to federal prison in 1983 for evading more than $125,000 in excise taxes. The Christian Schmidt Brewing Co., between Second and Hancock Streets south of Girard Avenue, was the city's last independent brewery and had been a local institution since 1860.
FOOD
May 15, 1996 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1698, two dozen years before Samuel Adams was born (the patriot, mind you, not the beer label), a mayor in Faversham, Kent, England, set up a brewery over an artesian well. Only last year, the brewery, which later become Shepherd Neame, finally began to export its products to the colonies. Today's beer companies are fond of prattling on and on about all the time it takes to craft a beer. Shepherd Neame, England's longest-operating brewery, could use that excuse to explain why it took nearly three centuries to reach out to Americans.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
ROB ZARKO'S two-story brick home, on a lazy shaded road in suburban Wallingford, Delaware County, looks much like every other home in the neighborhood. Well-tended lawn, check. Couple of bikes in the grass, check. Portable basketball hoop in the driveway, check. Thirty-gallon mash tun in the garage. Uh, check? Welcome to Ship Bottom Brewing, the area's newest and tiniest new brewery. If you blink, you'll miss it. Fully licensed and operational, Ship Bottom is brewing up minuscule batches of two barrels each, or enough to fill just over 100 sixpacks - if it had a bottling line.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
It's probably always a risky proposition to go out with an ex, especially if you haven't seen him in a while and there are still some unresolved issues floating around. But it's a much safer proposition if there's good beer in plentiful supply, as there is at Nodding Head Brewery. Nodding Head, which opened in January on the site of the former Samuel Adams Brew House, has become a hangout for the 20something set, drawn by brewmeister Brandon Greenwood's "handcrafted" beers. Greenwood, who earned a beer-making degree in Edinburgh, has done time at breweries in Scotland as well as Stroh's in Minnesota and a stint as head brewer at Philadelphia's Yards Brewing Company.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Baby bumps could be giving way to beer bellies in Northern Liberties, where Yards Brewing Co. plans to build its new suds factory in the vacant warehouse that had until recently been home to Destination Maternity Corp. Yards is under agreement to lease up to 85,000 square feet at the maternity apparel company's former headquarters building at Fifth and Spring Garden Streets, part of a plan to boost production beyond the capacity of its current brewery about a mile away, company officials said.
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NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia was once a city of breweries, many of them run by German immigrants who knew their pilsners from their porters. Their stout old buildings have been disappearing as the city's housing boom spreads north into former German neighborhoods. Ortliebs' main brew house, the last in Northern Liberties, went down in 2013. But farther north, several others survive. One of the most evocative is the Weisbrod & Hess brewery on Martha Street in Kensington. Founded in 1882 by two German saloon-keepers, George Weisbrod and Christian Hess, the brewery grew to a full-block complex between Frankford Avenue and the aptly named Amber Street.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
IMAGINE THAT, 40 years ago, Coors brewed a beer called Down With Queers. Or that 60 years ago Falstaff had a beer named Whites Are Supreme. It never happened because, though both breweries held some strong political views, neither advertised them on beer cans. Which is why the widely publicized campaign against North Carolina's anti-transgender law by a group of Tar Heel breweries is a remarkable step down an uncertain path. For, while brewery operators - like any business owner - hold personal opinions, they typically don't wear their politics on their sleeve.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Baby bumps could be giving way to beer bellies in Northern Liberties, where Yards Brewing Co. plans to build its new suds factory in the vacant warehouse that had until recently been home to Destination Maternity Corp. Yards is under agreement to lease up to 85,000 square feet at the maternity apparel company's former headquarters building at Fifth and Spring Garden Streets, part of a plan to boost production beyond the capacity of its current brewery about a mile away, company officials said.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Yuengling brewery has agreed to settle violations of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. In a consent decree filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania brewery - America's oldest - agreed to spend about $7 million to improve environmental measures and pay a $2.8 million penalty. Federal authorities said D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc., based in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, violated Clean Water Act requirements for companies that discharge industrial waste to municipal publicly owned wastewater-treatment facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016
THERE ARE NO saloons in Pitman, N.J. No bottle shops or restaurants with liquor licenses, either. This is a dry town, a vestige of its founding as a Methodist retreat. Yet on Saturday afternoon, with a ceremonial tapping of the first keg, a brewery will open on Broadway, the Gloucester County town's main drag. A brewery with a tasting room and eight taps and plenty of suds. And that's not all, for by the end of summer, a second brewery is expected to open a mere two doors down the street - a veritable brewery row in a borough where, for 100 years, the closest thing to a stiff drink was a bottle of hair tonic at the barbershop.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin and Samantha Melamed, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND BEER CRITICS
S teuart and Michelle Pincombe are spending a year living in a trailer, traveling through the United States and Canada, spreading the word about the power classical music can have in surprising places. Tuesday night the couple stopped at Dock Street Brewery at 50th and Baltimore Streets, where Steuart played Baroque cello while an attentive standing-room-only crowd quenched its thirst for Bach and beer chosen to somehow match each other. Our critics weigh in on the evening.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: It seems there are new breweries opening every week. The latest to announce a big development is Evil Genius, which is building its brewery under the El on Front Street in Fishtown by early 2017, according to Michael Klein. That joins the new St. Benjamin's tasting room and brewpub set to open to the public in nearby Kensington next month, as well as at least another couple of brewery/cidery projects that have been discussed for the neighborhood.
NEWS
April 1, 2016
Exactly what is Yards Brewing selling in its new series of videos, Yards Good Fight ? It sure doesn't look like beer. The 90-second pieces shown online and in social media are part of the Northern Liberties brewery's ongoing Brew Unto Others advertising campaign that aims to frame the brewery as a solid part of the community. So far, two Good Fight videos have been posted, highlighting charitable organizations "making our backyard a better place to live and work. " One lauds celebrity chef Jose Garces and his foundation's support of immigrant health care and education programs, another publicizes ActionAIDS and its Dining Out for Life fund-raiser.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Title: Secretary-treasurer, International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 830. Home: Feasterville. Family: Wife, Frances; children, Anthony, Danielle Jenkinson, Thomas, Howard; seven grandchildren. Diplomas: Archbishop Ryan High School, Lincoln Technical Institute, automotive, diesel. First job: Dishwasher. Career: Started recycling bottles at Pepsi's plant in Northeast Philadelphia, later became a driver. Joined union staff as an organizer in 1995, rose through ranks.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
THE WEEK should not pass without a toast to the 50th anniversary of the seminal event of modern American brewing. No, I'm not talking about the invention of the beer-can ring-pull. I'm instead raising my glass to Aug. 2, 1965, the day when a 27-year-old named Frederick Louis Maytag 3rd - a/k/a Fritz - paid "practically nothing" for a controlling share of San Francisco's aging dump known as Anchor Brewery. It was that day that Maytag slapped American beer in its face and woke it up from its pitiful, ugly slide into mass mediocrity.
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