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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2011 | By CODY FRANCIS, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
On July 26, 2006, Jim Gebicki removed his wristwatch and placed it in a small box. He hasn't worn it since, nor does he plan to ever wear it again. The watch, bearing the green and white Rolling Rock beer insignia synonymous with Gebicki's hometown of Latrobe, Pa., had been a gift from his former employer, Latrobe Brewing Co., on his 25th anniversary with the company. July 26, 2006, was also the day the last bottle of Rolling Rock rolled off the line at the Latrobe brewery, marking the end of a 67-year relationship with the town it helped define.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
ROB ZARKO'S two-story brick home, on a lazy shaded road in suburban Wallingford, Delaware County, looks much like every other home in the neighborhood. Well-tended lawn, check. Couple of bikes in the grass, check. Portable basketball hoop in the driveway, check. Thirty-gallon mash tun in the garage. Uh, check? Welcome to Ship Bottom Brewing, the area's newest and tiniest new brewery. If you blink, you'll miss it. Fully licensed and operational, Ship Bottom is brewing up minuscule batches of two barrels each, or enough to fill just over 100 sixpacks - if it had a bottling line.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware waterfront developer yesterday unveiled plans to turn the old C. Schmidt's & Sons Brewery - abandoned and graffiti-covered for years - into a $35 million shopping and residential complex. During a demolition ceremony, Mayor Street climbed behind the controls of a bright yellow excavator machine and took out the first brick wall, heralding the Northern Liberties project as a step toward his administration's mandate: improving the quality of life in the neighborhoods. "We think this development will be a shot in the arm to a neighborhood which has great potential and great promise," Street said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
ADAMSTOWN, Pa. - More for the novelty of it than out of necessity, Elizabeth Stoudt commuted to work last week in her underemployed snowshoes, crunching down the hill from her big, old farmhouse here to her bread bakery a snowball's throw away. On her way she fed the sheep - Jacob's Sheep, a breed of varying colors, tending toward dark - and the Toulouse geese, who in less tranquil settings might find themselves being fattened for foie gras. There was a nod to the neighboring emu and the shaggy Angora goat.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN VIEW, N.J. - Matt McDevitt spent years living the dream of every grown-up Jersey Shore kid: teach high school during the year, work the beach patrol during summer; in his case, the Sacramento beach in Ventnor. But this year, McDevitt and three buddies, two of them also teachers at Mainland Regional High School, will spend summer chasing an even more tantalizing beach dream: presiding over their own brewery, the Tuckahoe Brewing Co., creating recipes inspired by everything from warm summer days (Marshallville Wit)
BUSINESS
April 10, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
A top executive at C. Schmidt & Sons, Philadelphia's last remaining brewery, told the company's salaried employees this morning that the firm has signed a "letter of intent" to sell some of its business to G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis., according to a source inside the company. Fred Von Czoerning, Schmidt's vice president and treasurer, told approximately 100 workers who met in the firm's board room, the deal, which was signed this week by the brewery's owner, William H. Pflaumer, only included the brewery's labels.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis Pasteur was working for a brewery when he developed the process that would become known as pasteurization. The brewery wanted to keep its beer from spoiling, and Pasteur figured out that heating the liquid would kill the bacteria that spoiled it. Will Kemper was working as a chemical engineer for an environmental firm when he made his own discovery about beer. He liked it so much, he decided he should make his own. Kemper, 42, found that the ancient art of brewing was buttressed by lots of science.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christian Schmidt Brewing Co., the city's last independent brewery and a local institution since 1860, has signed an agreement to sell its brands to a major national brewer and is expected to close by June 1. A shutdown of the brewery at Second Street and Girard Avenue would leave an estimated 250 employees without jobs. Confirming earlier reports that a sale of Schmidt was imminent, officials of Schmidt and G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis., in separate announcements yesterday, said that Schmidt's brands will be sold to Heileman.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Corry, a specialist in developing economies, knew better than to fall for the line that has separated so many men from their money: Want to buy a beer business? But the more he sipped Herold, a traditional Bohemian-style lager, the more he thought it made sense to leave his comfortable job at the U.S. Embassy here and purchase a 500-year-old brewery in a country where everybody's a beer expert and a world-class pint sells for 30 cents. "You can imagine how profitable it is to sell beer here," the tweedy, bearded Corry, 39, joked recently, his fingers pinching an unfiltered Camel in a Prague bar that sells his beer.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a tense moment in early 1996, Bill Covaleski and Ron Barchet pulled the tap and drew a golden liquid from their first keg of Victory beer. They studied it, swirled it, sniffed it and finally tasted it. That was when they knew: This would be good. Now, nearly a decade later, the mammoth vats at a former Pepperidge Farm factory are filled and cooking; the steam wafting from the stacks has the pungent smell of hops and yeast. Covaleski and Barchet are brewing the Beers that May Make Downingtown Famous.
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