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NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry C. Broadley, 89, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime engineer for the Christian Schmidt Brewing Co. who turned the key in the lock on the brewery's final day, ending an era, died Wednesday, March 12, of heart disease at Riddle Memorial Hospital. From 1955 to 1989, Mr. Broadley was the director of engineering for Schmidt's brewery, at Second and Hancock Streets in Northern Liberties. In its heyday, the plant was a Philadelphia institution. Started in 1860, Schmidt's grew until by 1970 it was producing more than three million barrels of beer annually.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
GOD ALMIGHTY - an American-made Trappist beer? That's the news that stunned beer drinkers last month, as St. Joseph's Abbey, about an hour west of Boston, revealed that its Spencer Trappist Ale had been certified as the first Trappist beer brewed outside of Europe. The monastic brewery will carry on the ancient Benedictine principal that monks should "live by the work of their hands. " It all seems so quaint and holy, especially considering the near-sacred regard for other Trappist beers, including Chimay and Orval . We've come a long way since the days when a community of beer-making Catholic monks in western Pennsylvania were a national scandal.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
LOOKS LIKE Jeremy Cowan and the rest of the team at Shmaltz Brewing are dipping into their own stash again. America's least orthodox Jewish brewery is marking the convergence next week of Hanukkah and Thanksgiving with a fairly weird image of an "intergalactic turducken mothership" and a monster edition of its annual holiday ale, this year called Jewbelation Reborn . The latke-eating turducken is powered by a menorah of nine flame-spouting beer...
NEWS
October 25, 2013
THERE'S a brewery in Malvern making superb beer that you can't buy - not for all the money in the world. The ales are fermented with unusual yeast strains, then meticulously aged for months in wooden barrels and often blended before bottling. Those few who've been lucky enough to get a sip say that they're on par with some of the most highly rated sour ales of Belgium, beers that often sell for $30 a bottle or more. But put away your credit card. The only sure way to get a sip from La Cabra Brewing is if you get your name on an exclusive mailing list.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
GET READY for yet another wave of new breweries in and around Philadelphia. By my count, up to 20 more should be opening between now and next spring. Some are tucked in city neighborhoods or borough shopping districts; other larger operations are setting up shop in suburban industrial parks. Notably, a third of the newcomers are opening on the other side of the Delaware, thanks to recently enacted New Jersey liquor regs that allow small breweries to sell draft beer to visitors.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Gretz, 91, a scion of the family that brewed beer in Philadelphia under the Gretz name and later sold it wholesale from operations in the suburbs, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, of coronary artery disease at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. The Rieger & Gretz Brewing Co. was founded in 1882 by Mr. Gretz's grandfather, William. It was renamed the William Gretz Brewing Co. after Prohibition ended in 1933. During the company's heyday in the 1940s and early 1950s, Robert Gretz was director of sales.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
SOMEDAY, Fat Tire , the enormously popular amber ale from Colorado, will be available in Pennsylvania. Not this year, and probably not next. But soon enough, New Belgium Brewing Co.'s flagship will shoulder its way in among the 6,229 brands already registered for sale in the Keystone State. First, it hits the shelves next door, in Delaware. Its slow, deliberate rollout this week in one of the nation's smallest states underscores the challenge that the brewery faces as it tries to establish a foothold in the heavily populated Northeast.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE PAUSE now to raise a beer in commemoration of Belgium's independence from the Evil Empire of the Netherlands. 'Twas 182 years ago this Sunday that a ragtag band of Belgies dressed like Indians clambered aboard Dutch ships and dumped barrels of Hollandaise sauce in the Harbor of Brussels. This heroic act of rebellion ignited the infamous Battle of the Bulge, where corpulent gourmands from Antwerp faced down round upon round of Edam cheese. The Dutch army, unable to march in wooden shoes, quickly surrendered and returned to Amsterdam to resume smoking pot. Or something like that.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By Tali Arbel, Associated Press
NEW YORK - To see how a small business can transform a neighborhood, just follow the barrels. About 30 years ago, beer lovers wanting to create their own drinks started taking over abandoned buildings in rundown districts. They refitted them with tanks, kettles, and casks, and started churning out beer. The by-product was a boom in craft-beer drinkers; barrels shipped have more than doubled in the last decade, according to trade publication Beer Marketer's Insights. Craft beer now makes up nearly 7 percent of the slow-growing U.S. beer market.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
ROB ZARKO'S two-story brick home, on a lazy shaded road in suburban Wallingford, Delaware County, looks much like every other home in the neighborhood. Well-tended lawn, check. Couple of bikes in the grass, check. Portable basketball hoop in the driveway, check. Thirty-gallon mash tun in the garage. Uh, check? Welcome to Ship Bottom Brewing, the area's newest and tiniest new brewery. If you blink, you'll miss it. Fully licensed and operational, Ship Bottom is brewing up minuscule batches of two barrels each, or enough to fill just over 100 sixpacks - if it had a bottling line.
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