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NEWS
June 5, 2013
Two men were hospitalized, one in critical condition, after being shot in the Brewerytown section of North Philadelphia late Tuesday night, police said. The shooting occurred shortly before 11:15 p.m. on the 2800 block of Cecil B. Moore Avenue and several surrounding blocks - "a pretty big scene," said Chief Inspector Scott Small. One victim, a 27-year-old man, was shot twice in the upper thigh, Small said, and was taken to Temple University Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
PUTTING HIS money where his dream is, Marathon Restaurants CEO Cary Borish is investing $100,000 to turn a long-vacant, blighted Brewerytown lot into Marathon Farm, which will supply his six Philadelphia eateries with fresh vegetables and feed the residents of a neighborhood that has seen its share of hard times. Although the third-of-an-acre lot on the corner of 27th and Master streets is still bordered by the ancient redbrick walls of a city warehouse that collapsed 20 years ago, Borish watched happily Sunday as blight gave way to beautiful on its way to bountiful.
REAL_ESTATE
June 21, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
A stately house of worship, designed in the Gothic style by famed architect Frank Rushmore Watson and built in 1888, was saved by real estate developer Jordan Brody in 2012, just as the wrecking ball was heading for the former Episcopal Church of the Covenant on Girard Avenue in Brewerytown. The stars further aligned for the sandstone neighborhood landmark after Brody bought the building and hired Philadelphia architect Ian Smith. Smith designed a second life for the edifice that includes 16 apartments for rent, some of which are on two floors, with sleeping quarters in the former church loft.
REAL_ESTATE
December 15, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
MM Partners real estate development company aims to help transform Philadelphia's Brewerytown neighborhood. By buying and rehabbing shells, stores and empty or underused warehouses, MM Partners hopes to revive the West Girard Avenue retail corridor along with its residential developments. All Philadelphia locals, David Waxman and Jacob Roller are co-managing partners of MM, and Aaron Smith is partner and director of property management, sales and marketing. Currently, they have an office in a recent rehab at 1234 N. 30th St. To date, MM Partners, founded in 2001, has renovated and owns 50 properties in Brewerytown, including mixed-use, multifamily and single-family projects, about $45 million worth within a five-square-mile radius.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN CASE you were wondering, it's not OK to dump wild-animal corpses onto vacant lots. One New Yorker apparently learned that lesson the hard way yesterday after he threw the mutilated carcass of a bobcat he had killed onto a lot at 31st and Jefferson streets in Brewerytown. Sarah Eremus, a spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania SPCA, said the man called the organization early yesterday after seeing news reports about the remains, which were discovered by a dog-walker Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Barbara Laker and Daily News Staff Writer
THE DISC jockey sat in his SUV Sunday afternoon and shook his head as cops removed yellow crime-scene tape that had cordoned off the block in Brewerytown where a half-deflated pink balloon, tied to a house railing, bounced pathetically on the sidewalk.   Just 12 hours earlier, about 2:30 a.m., the DJ had been winding down his gig, playing just the right party songs for a woman known only as Kia who was celebrating her 25th birthday inside her home on Thompson Street near Hollywood.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was almost by accident, the way City Council President Darrell L. Clarke shared the news with his mentor, former Mayor John F. Street. But in a big city where battles over business can be complex and too numerous to count, even a rare victory like this one in Brewerytown can become an afterthought. The duo were on the phone Thursday morning when Street's onetime right-hand man said he had to dash for 31st Street and Girard Avenue. There, a construction crane would soon load a steel roof onto a new cinder-block building in a neighborhood that had once been the city's beer-brewing capital.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
When Christian John Muller, the big beer distributor in Northeast Philadelphia, was a spry 10-year-old, he and a Brewerytown pal by the name of Charlie Kraft were headed for a baseball game in Fairmount Park when a light went on in "Chonny" Muller's head. "Charlie," Chonny Muller said to his pal, "Let's stop at my Pop's brewery before the game and have a beer and a pretzel. " Such behavior by a 10-year-old might seem shocking by today's standards, but such were the values of the people of Brewerytown, a near all-German settlement just north of Fairmount in North Philadelphia, in wartime 1918.
REAL_ESTATE
September 10, 1995 | By Sally Downey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rich aroma of malted grain once hung over Brewerytown like a genial fog. A century ago, 14 breweries operated in this wedge of North Philadelphia east of Fairmount Park. The breweries produced millions of cases of beer a year and employed thousands of people. Workers lived in nearby rowhouses. The breweries closed long ago, but the rowhouses remain. Today, only a few of their owners remember when Brewerytown was known as "the beer capital of America. " Several of the buildings in the once-sprawling brewery complexes sit empty.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five days after Christmas, Tommy Joshua received an e-mail from a Philadelphia Housing Authority official that threatened to bulldoze the preceding three years of his life. The agency would be testing soil on land it owned in Sharswood, a neighborhood defined by its two 18-story project towers and the expanse of vacant land that surrounds them. Joshua put on his boots. With a dozen neighbors Jan. 6, he walked five blocks to prevent the PHA from digging into its own property at 24th and Bolton Streets, once an eyesore and now something promising, named North Philly Peace Park.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Peter Hwang and his family, who own Center City's Oh So Good quick-serve, have gone farther up the food chain with SouthGate , a Korean-inspired pub, replacing the landmark Tangier (1801 Lombard St., 215-560-8443). Opening is Thursday after a week of trials. The building was stripped down to its bones for necessary structural repair, yielding a sleek dining room, an open kitchen set behind a glass window, and windows you can now see through. The name suggests Namdaemun, the great south gate of the open-air market in Seoul, and is also a play on the location, bridging Rittenhouse just to the north and South Street at its doorstep.
REAL_ESTATE
June 21, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
A stately house of worship, designed in the Gothic style by famed architect Frank Rushmore Watson and built in 1888, was saved by real estate developer Jordan Brody in 2012, just as the wrecking ball was heading for the former Episcopal Church of the Covenant on Girard Avenue in Brewerytown. The stars further aligned for the sandstone neighborhood landmark after Brody bought the building and hired Philadelphia architect Ian Smith. Smith designed a second life for the edifice that includes 16 apartments for rent, some of which are on two floors, with sleeping quarters in the former church loft.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IT WAS THE YOUNGER of two brothers who announced a robbery at a GameStop in North Philly who first began firing at Police Officer Robert Wilson III, prosecutors said yesterday. But both brothers - Ramone Williams, 25, and Carlton Hipps, 29 - fired at the officer, and more than the first shot was potentially lethal, prosecutors said. Williams and Hipps, both of Hollywood Street near Stiles in Brewerytown, yesterday waived their preliminary hearing in a standing-room-only courtroom filled with police officers in blue, other cops and the slain officer's family, including his grandmother, sister and brother.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeanne Ray Willig, 92, a retired state administrator and dedicated gardener, died Thursday, May 14, at Lankenau Hospital of complications from a stroke. A longtime resident of Lower Merion, Mrs. Willig was born in Wyomissing, Pa., and moved with her family as a teenager to Philadelphia. She graduated from Olney High School, where she edited the student newspaper. She worked for years alongside her high school sweetheart and, later, husband, Paul Willig, at the family delicatessen, Paul & Irv's, in Brewerytown.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Sailor Eddie was going through his regular morning routine outside his tattoo shop at Front and Girard. He had swept up outside, on the lookout for drug baggies. Now, Eddie, owner of Bonnie & Clyde Tattoo Parlour, which sits just out of the shadow of the El, was chasing away some guys that he suspected were from the methadone clinic down the street. The usual waltz. Eddie told them to leave. They told Eddie to go do something to himself. Eddie opened the door and let them have a look at his boxer-pit bull mix, Bonnie.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five days after Christmas, Tommy Joshua received an e-mail from a Philadelphia Housing Authority official that threatened to bulldoze the preceding three years of his life. The agency would be testing soil on land it owned in Sharswood, a neighborhood defined by its two 18-story project towers and the expanse of vacant land that surrounds them. Joshua put on his boots. With a dozen neighbors Jan. 6, he walked five blocks to prevent the PHA from digging into its own property at 24th and Bolton Streets, once an eyesore and now something promising, named North Philly Peace Park.
REAL_ESTATE
December 15, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
MM Partners real estate development company aims to help transform Philadelphia's Brewerytown neighborhood. By buying and rehabbing shells, stores and empty or underused warehouses, MM Partners hopes to revive the West Girard Avenue retail corridor along with its residential developments. All Philadelphia locals, David Waxman and Jacob Roller are co-managing partners of MM, and Aaron Smith is partner and director of property management, sales and marketing. Currently, they have an office in a recent rehab at 1234 N. 30th St. To date, MM Partners, founded in 2001, has renovated and owns 50 properties in Brewerytown, including mixed-use, multifamily and single-family projects, about $45 million worth within a five-square-mile radius.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
UP AND DOWN the 1500 block of North Dover Street, handwritten notes on yellow legal-size sheets of paper were tucked inside the storm doors of every house. "My name is Danielle . . . My husband is Kyle," the notes began. "We would like to buy your house. Please call or text me at (516) . . . " It then gives a number for the couple in Long Island, N.Y. Miss D, who lives in the middle of this tidy block of brick rowhouses - just east of 29th Street between Jefferson and Oxford - shows the note at her front door.
NEWS
October 17, 2014
WHEN LAST WE heard from Hohenadel Brewery, the 19th-century East Falls landmark was wincing under the weight of a wrecking ball. It was 1997. Just one look at the stubborn but crumbling brick structure at Conrad Street and Indian Queen Lane told you it was time to pull the plug. The brewery that once proclaimed its "Well Earned Supremacy" could only sigh as it joined the likes of Gretz and Esslinger and Erlanger in the great Philadelphia pile of brewery dust. Indian Queen Ale . . . Rival Porter . . . Trilby Export - the brands that Hohenadel brewed till it closed in 1952 were gone and mostly forgotten.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANNA MARIE Perkins-Bottoms had a number of jobs in her working career, but among the most satisfying was working with autistic children at the Wood Services School. "She loved that job," said her cousin Estelle Matthews. "She would say, 'Those kids are normal; we're special people.' "She really loved those kids. They are so loving, kind and generous, she would say. It was more than a job to her. She said she learned a lot from those children. " Anna Marie, who also worked with homeless people at the RHD Ridge Shelter, at the Postal Service's main office at 30th and Market streets, and in retail, died Sept.
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