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NEWS
May 27, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As members of the military, some fought in the rain; some even watched as their buddies died in the rain. So yesterday, as veterans, they did not let the downpour stop them from paying their respects to all those who had served their country. American Legion Post 821 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2 sponsored their annual Memorial Day remembrance ceremony and parade through the Bridesburg section of the city. In a steady rain without benefit of umbrellas, Gov. Rendell - who served in the Army Reserve - and Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz - whose sports injuries kept him out of the military - led the hour-long parade of marching bands and military units past rowhouses draped in bunting and flags.
NEWS
June 4, 2001
Opinions not so divided on U.S. estate tax The article "Opinions are divided over U.S. estate taxes' effect" (Inquirer, May 21) causes this reaction in many of us: Opinion is not divided! All of us who earned the money want the estate tax repealed entirely. Some few who were generously endowed by fate may have so much that it doesn't matter to them. To the rest of us, lawyer's views are not an opinion, they are a business strategy. That money was taxed when we earned it, and we don't want it taxed again.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bridesburg woman who took in a stranger's child on Christmas, after coming to the aid of the boy's mother, is one step closer to becoming the little boy's foster parent. A Family Court judge yesterday agreed to allow Michelle Kueny to continue caring for 2 1/2-year-old Mark Brown until a formal investigation by the Department of Human Services can be completed. During the half-hour hearing, the judge upheld a restraining order giving DHS temporary custody of Mark and allowing the agency to place him under Kueny's care, said Liza Rodriguez, a DHS spokeswoman.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The railroad tracks in Bridesburg, where a teenager was killed by a train Monday night, are often a place where teenagers loiter and drink, according to residents of the Northeast neighborhood. But Rachel Brett, 15, was not one of those teens, out to party or cause trouble, friends said yesterday. Quiet, sweet and an ace field hockey player who recently made Frankford High's varsity team, Brett was simply crossing the tracks on the Bridge Street overpass with a friend shortly after 7 p.m. Monday when an Amtrak train struck and killed her. Brett's friend, also 15, ran off the tracks in time and was taken to St. Christopher's Hospital, examined and released.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
Toto, I have a feeling we're not in Philadelphia anymore. " Exactly when this occurred to Margo Grady is unclear. Sometime last Saturday night, she must have realized she was lost. Generations of children have been taught by their parents that if they're lost, they should find a police officer. But Margo Grady is a police officer. And that wasn't Toto with her in Car 236, drifting around New Jersey. It was a rape victim she was supposed to be driving from Jefferson University Hospital in center-city Philadelphia to the police Special Victims Unit on the grounds of the old Frankford Arsenal in Bridesburg.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia police officer who wound up near Newark, N.J., instead of Bridesburg when transporting a rape victim is not likely to face disciplinary action, police officials said yesterday. Investigators were reluctant to discuss the incident but said Officer Margo Grady took a child and mother from the 23d District in North Philadelphia to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital to be checked after reporting a sexual assault Saturday night. After the child was examined, Grady was ordered to bring the child and mother to the Special Victims Unit at the Frankford Arsenal in Bridesburg.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
When Monsignor Bernard Witkowski of Bridesburg joins Pope John Paul II concelebrating Mass in Poland Monday, it will seem like old times. The Polish-speaking pastor of St. John Cantius Catholic Church on Almond Street has been traveling to Poland for such meetings since 1976, when he met the future pope as Karol Wojtyla, the dynamic cardinal of Krakow. "I never thought about him being a pope, but I knew he was an outstanding man, hearing him talk, with his command of language," said Witkowski, 64, before his midweek translantic flight.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a generation, residents of Bridesburg and Port Richmond, two of the city's most tightly woven communities, have lived in the shadow of Interstate 95 and the Betsy Ross Bridge. As crickets chirp lullabies in neat suburban cul-de-sacs, working-class families in these riverfront rowhouses are serenaded by idling big rigs and the rattle of walls shaken by thundering trucks. "Sometimes you wonder, when you hear the rumble, if it's going to knock your house apart," said Harry Engasser of Plum Street in Bridesburg.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Services will be held today for Stephanie Jesiolowski, matriarch and community "cornerstone" who didn't fear taking a chance and, along with her husband, opened what might have been Bridesburg's first flower shop almost 50 years ago. The lifelong resident of Bridesburg died Thursday. She was 79. The Jesiolowskis opened their business, Ideal Florists, in 1950 in their home on Thompson Street near Orthodox, just a half block down the street from where "Stephie" was born and raised.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Pezak, 84, of Bridesburg, a former sheet-metal worker, government employee and state legislator, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Immaculate Mary Nursing Home. He had been in declining health for five years. Mr. Pezak was born in Mayfield, Lackawanna County, and grew up and was educated in the nearby town of Jessup. He left school at 16 to work, first as a mine laborer and later as a store clerk, huckleberry picker, labor recruiter and meat-cutter. He came to the Philadelphia area in 1940 and was a sheet-metal worker in shipyards in Camden and Philadelphia.
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