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Bright Eyes

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NEWS
March 7, 1992 | BY G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
The Pennsylvania College of Optometry has announced a multi-year program aimed at providing free vision screenings for children and adults at schools throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The program, announced to coincide with the college's Save Your Vision Month campaign was launched with screenings of students and teachers from the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. The program targets some 40,000 Catholic school children and their parents for screenings over the next several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Conor Oberst, who performs as Bright Eyes, played the Trocadero a year ago, a worshipful crowd of sensitive young people stood rapt at attention, sighing each time the guitarist's voice got caught in his throat. Eight months later, Oberst was back in Philadelphia with the Vote for Change tour at the Wachovia Center, playing before a crowd of Bruce Springsteen-loving old people, most of whom had no idea who Bright Eyes was. The floppy-haired singer shook his maracas and, alongside Spring?steen and Michael Stipe, poured his idealistic heart into anthems like Nick Lowe's "(What's So Funny 'Bout)
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Conor Oberst began growing up in public when he was 14 years old and established himself as a songwriting wunderkind with the band Commander Venus. And even when he was a boy, Oberst was a serious man. That's still true of the word slinger from Omaha, Neb., now 31, whose band Bright Eyes headlined a bill that also included M. Ward and Dawes at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Fairmount Park on Friday. Bright Eyes' nearly 21/2-hour, not-so-well-paced, career-spanning set reached back to 2000's Fevers and Mirrors for "The Calendar Hung Itself" and "Something Vague," but was rooted in The People's Key , the songwriter's first album under the Bright Eyes rubric since 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Conor Oberst and Devendra Banhart, two celebrated, quavery-voiced songwriters, each in his early 20s, write stream-of-consciousness lyrics but with contrasting results: Where Oberst is expansive, Banhart is cryptic. Nebraska's Oberst, who will bring his band Bright Eyes to the Trocadero on Monday, is a veteran; the 23-year-old has been releasing songs since he was 13. Oberst writes as if he can't keep up with all the words in his brain. His lyrics scan in paragraphs rather than lines and rattle though verse after self-conscious verse.
NEWS
January 31, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The most imaginative between-song shout-out from the audience at the Bright Eyes show at the sold-out Academy of Music on Friday: "I don't love you, Conor. " But everybody else in the teenaged-to-twentysomething crowd did, it seemed. And what's not to love? Conor Oberst, who performs as Bright Eyes - this time with a six-piece band that featured chief musical collaborator Mike Mogis on lap steel and mandolin - has been anointed the rock-poet it-boy of the moment, and with good reason.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
On Monday at the Trocadero, the response of the sold-out, all-ages crowd to Bright Eyes and leader Conor Oberst felt ceremonial. Each song - the quivering "One Foot," the rumbling "A New Arrangement" - was greeted with a quietness usually reserved for whispered secrets. Bright Eyes' brand of aggressive though romantic imagery verges on being over the top. But as a lyricist and singer, Oberst avoids too much sentimentality, and ends up as cutting as early Dylan. At the Troc, he was flowery yet incisive, sounding like Robert Smith without the ironic ire, and remaining reserved as he bore down through the tribal drums and carnival organs of "The Calendar Hung Itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Saturday's sold-out Desaparecidos show at Union Transfer began with a recording of Ted Nugent enthusiastically advocating unrestricted gun laws and working up to a comparison of President Obama to King George. As Nugent's message became increasingly extreme, the band, led by Bright Eyes' Conor Oberst, launched into "The Left is Right," a brief blast of pro-Occupy Wall Street punk rock that announced an evening of impassioned politics and rabble-rousing rock and roll. Oberst formed Desaparecidos in the early 2000s as a noisy voice for political and social change, and as a contrast to his intensely self-absorbed work in the much-loved Bright Eyes.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Ever since he began playing shows in his hometown of Omaha, Neb., when he was 12 years old, Conor Oberst has been a busy man. The gifted lyricist, now 32, has a reputation as an indie folk-rock oracle, recording with musicians Mike Mogis and Nate Walcott as Bright Eyes, under his own name, and with side projects such as the agit-punk band Desaparecidos and the indie super-group Monsters of Folk. On Sunday, Oberst will make a rare, almost-solo appearance at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
Those Darlins Those Darlins routinely get labeled as a cowpunk or alt-country band, but that's mainly because they hail from Tennessee and drop the"g" from the last word of their excellent name. Actually, darlin', what the fab foursome of front women Nikki, Jessi, and Kelley Darlin and drummer Linwood Regensburg are is a trashy garage rock band with more in common with Joan Jett and the Ramones than Dolly Parton. The Darlins' second full-length album, Screws Get Loose, expands the group's range from the stoner blues of "Mystic Mind" to the girl-group grabbiness of "Tina Said" and "Boy," and the songwriting quality is uniformly high throughout the tight, tough, 11-song set. Fellow Nashville garage band Natural Child are along for the ride.
NEWS
February 25, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Monday night's show at the Trocadero was billed as an indie-rock songwriter round-robin, a chance to hear Conor Oberst, the earnest young leader of Omaha's critically acclaimed Bright Eyes, mix things up with Oregon troubadour M. Ward, and Jim James, lead singer of Kentucky rockers My Morning Jacket. It was that and more. For nearly three hours, through song after graceful song about budding romance and its lonesome aftermath, these wunderkinder helped each other recast and thoroughly reanimate their works.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2015
Sarah Santiago 10th grade Esperanza Academy Charter School Fully fund my education because it is my right to have one. I have the right to knowledge, and I have the right to learn about the world and what is happening in it. I have the right to know of all the hate and misery that is in our world, but I also have the right to gain the tools that I need to change that. Fully fund my education because I am a young Latina, and we live in a world where the odds are always against the favor of myself and those just like me. Fully fund my education because I want to be a leader, and I want to be a leader without having to be looked down upon because I am female and a Latina.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On a cold-snap Saturday night in a crowded, airtight, windowless Boot & Saddle, Allo Darlin' brought some breeze and brightness. They couldn't help it. With three albums (including the just-released We Come From the Same Place ), the Anglo Australian quartet has experience at crafting sweetly sunny, smart pop with innocent yet contemplative lyrics whose hard jangle and flittering flights of funky fancy are reminiscent of Scotland's Orange Juice. But this band's chiming, charming vocals and effervescent, experiential lyrics come not from a wonky Scot but from Australian singer/ukulele player Elizabeth Morris, a fresh-faced, pixie-haired lass whose light, sharp alto is as open as her expression of glee - often in the lively embrace of sad-eyed bewilderment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
'I used to think time was of the essence," Conor Oberst sang on "Hundreds of Ways" during his sold-out show at Union Transfer on Wednesday. "Now I'm just trying to get some sleep. " That's right, folks: Bright Eyes is all grown up. The wunderkind songwriter from Omaha, after two decades as an indie oracle, is 34. This week, he put out Upside Down Mountain , a solo album that's his first-ever for a major label and first full-length release since 2011's The People's Key , with his band Bright Eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Saturday's sold-out Desaparecidos show at Union Transfer began with a recording of Ted Nugent enthusiastically advocating unrestricted gun laws and working up to a comparison of President Obama to King George. As Nugent's message became increasingly extreme, the band, led by Bright Eyes' Conor Oberst, launched into "The Left is Right," a brief blast of pro-Occupy Wall Street punk rock that announced an evening of impassioned politics and rabble-rousing rock and roll. Oberst formed Desaparecidos in the early 2000s as a noisy voice for political and social change, and as a contrast to his intensely self-absorbed work in the much-loved Bright Eyes.
NEWS
December 19, 2012
A look at some of those who died in Newtown, Conn.: Charlotte Bacon, 6 They were supposed to be for the holidays, but finally on Friday, after hearing much begging, Charlotte Bacon's mother relented and let her wear the new pink dress and boots to school. It was the last outfit the outgoing redhead would ever pick out. Charlotte's older brother, Guy, was also in the school but was not shot. Her parents, JoAnn and Joel, had lived in Newtown for four or five years, JoAnn's brother John Hagen, of Nisswa, Minn., told Newsday.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Ever since he began playing shows in his hometown of Omaha, Neb., when he was 12 years old, Conor Oberst has been a busy man. The gifted lyricist, now 32, has a reputation as an indie folk-rock oracle, recording with musicians Mike Mogis and Nate Walcott as Bright Eyes, under his own name, and with side projects such as the agit-punk band Desaparecidos and the indie super-group Monsters of Folk. On Sunday, Oberst will make a rare, almost-solo appearance at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Conor Oberst began growing up in public when he was 14 years old and established himself as a songwriting wunderkind with the band Commander Venus. And even when he was a boy, Oberst was a serious man. That's still true of the word slinger from Omaha, Neb., now 31, whose band Bright Eyes headlined a bill that also included M. Ward and Dawes at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Fairmount Park on Friday. Bright Eyes' nearly 21/2-hour, not-so-well-paced, career-spanning set reached back to 2000's Fevers and Mirrors for "The Calendar Hung Itself" and "Something Vague," but was rooted in The People's Key , the songwriter's first album under the Bright Eyes rubric since 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
Those Darlins Those Darlins routinely get labeled as a cowpunk or alt-country band, but that's mainly because they hail from Tennessee and drop the"g" from the last word of their excellent name. Actually, darlin', what the fab foursome of front women Nikki, Jessi, and Kelley Darlin and drummer Linwood Regensburg are is a trashy garage rock band with more in common with Joan Jett and the Ramones than Dolly Parton. The Darlins' second full-length album, Screws Get Loose, expands the group's range from the stoner blues of "Mystic Mind" to the girl-group grabbiness of "Tina Said" and "Boy," and the songwriting quality is uniformly high throughout the tight, tough, 11-song set. Fellow Nashville garage band Natural Child are along for the ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
Bright Eyes front guy Conor Oberst made his initial mark with bruised and bitter, angsty and romantic adolescent confessionals. Songs folksily strummed and alt-rocking, packed with dense, stream-of-conscious imagery that searched the dark streets, bedrooms and corridors of power (as well as his soul) for meaning. And often came up short, with unbridled anger at a world out of his control. Now he's 31, though, and wiser to the big-picture realities. Oberst has learned to make a career as well as a calling of his work.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Touring with Jim James, M. Ward, and Mike Mogis in the indie super group Monsters of Folk has been like "a fantasy, an erotic dream" for Conor Oberst. The acclaimed songwriter doesn't mean that in a kinky way, though these Monsters - who will don shiny suits to play the Academy of Music Monday in support of their self-titled debut album - showed a talent for role playing by dressing up as Kiss in Louisville on Halloween. The Omaha singer/guitarist is simply saying the spotlight-sharing shows have been thoroughly gratifying for all. This week, Oberst and James - the singer for the Louisville rock band My Morning Jacket with the celestial sans vibrato voice - sat together for a speakerphone chat backstage from Toronto's Massey Hall.
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