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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Unless you've been trapped up a tree or stuck in an attic, you know that the Killers is Las Vegas' flashiest act since Siegfried & Roy. The seven-year-old quartet specializes in fast-forward American imagery in a driving synth-rock package with dressy singer/wordsmith Brandon Flowers providing the weirdly lyrical bow. "When we started and made the first album, there was the usual hunger bands have," Flowers says from a St. Louis tour stop....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
He answers to Johnny but spells it Gianni. Gianni Russo. Actor. Singer. Sometime Las Vegas restaurant owner. Bon vivant. Down-to-earth kinda guy. "People look at me quizzically all the time. They know me from the acting, but they can't place me," Russo says with a grin. "I tell 'em maybe you've seen my picture at the post office - on the most wanted list. You know, I could get 100 years behind bars, just for some of the mobster parts I've played in movies - Carlo in 'The Godfather,' Joey Fischetti in 'Four Aces,' Albert Anastasia in 'Lepke' . . . " Garbed in a well-tailored black suit and white silk shirt open to show a heavy gold neck chain, the deeply tanned, matinee-idol handsome, mid-40ish Russo has the cool air of an Italian stallion who's been around the track a few times.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Stephen Starr and chef Chris Painter are gearing up for the mid-October opening of their upscale, modern-Italian dinner spot, Il Pittore , at 2025 Sansom St., which until last weekend was Noble American Cookery . Painter, a Pottsville native and a vet of French Laundry and L'Espinasse , has been part of the Starr fold pretty much since 1999. He won raves at Tangerine and Angelina , and later became Starr's menu-development guy, credited with Parc , Frankford Hall , Pizzeria Stella , and the new Makoto in Miami.
NEWS
February 7, 1998
The flame got lit last night, and the schussing, lutzing and slapshotting begin in earnest today. Didn't we just have one of these Olympic things? It seems as if barely enough time has elapsed since the last five-ring sports circus for Kerri Strug's famous ankle sprain to have healed or for the ugly mud to be scraped from Richard Jewell's name. What's happened is that the quadrennial sporting festivals now arrive every two years, with the Winter Games staggered between Summer Games, largely to give the sub-freezing events a shot at more attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scandal is the intriguing new drama from Grey's Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes. It's built around one of the strongest (in every sense) female characters to hit prime time in recent memory. Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) is a former Oval Office insider who has formed a thriving, teeming crisis-management firm in Washington, D.C. With her frighteningly fast-talking staff (Henry Ian Cusick of Lost, Columbus Short, Darby Stanchfield, Katie Lowes, and Guillermo Diaz), she represents clients - a Russian diplomat, a Georgetown madame, a decorated military hero - caught in compromising positions.
NEWS
November 26, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Latin bombshell Shakira proved to be a fragmentation device Sunday night, blasting off in a thousand directions at the First Union Center. Alternating material from her Spanish-language albums with selections from Laundry Service, her current breakthrough record in English, the Colombian singer displayed a remarkable array of styles, from spare heartbreak hymns to stadium anthems. Traces of artists as disparate as Crystal Gayle and Alanis Morissette wafted through her delivery.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
1. You buy Amazing Bubbles by the gallon. 2. You can't remember your ATM password, but you know the channels of all the local public-TV stations. (12, 23, 35, 39). 3. You come to the sad realization that you actually have a favorite Teletubby. 4. You used to think the mess that children made with their food was disgusting. Now, you eat it. 5. Your child can't get into her bed at bedtime - because you've fallen asleep in it, waiting for her to come back from the bathroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Terry Johnson's Hysteria, currently onstage at the Wilma Theater, is the kind of script that jumps off the page, crackling with electricity and potential. A precursor and very close cousin to Steve Martin's Picasso at the Lapin Agile, it imagines a meeting between those two champions of the unconscious mind Sigmund Freud and Salvador Dal?. Such a meeting did occur, after Freud fled Vienna for London in 1938, but it was probably far more prosaic than this farcical fantasia.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Everything's up to date in Trevor Nunn's Oklahoma!, an exuberant and grittily realistic production that gives a cherished icon a welcome erotic charge and serves up some low-down with the hoedown. Nunn's treatment of the first collaboration of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein 2d is a lucid and contemporary reappraisal rather than a piece of radical revisionism. The show that exults, "We know we belong to the land," is itself earthy in two senses. Nunn is candid in his treatment of lust and the violence it can induce, and he honors the paean to the pioneer spirit and people who wrest a hard living from the soil that Rodgers and Hammerstein intended.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At least twice in Anton Chekhov's Ivanov, which opened last night at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre, the stage directions stipulate that a character should be "laughing and crying" or "laughing through tears. " They might as well say the same of the rarely staged play as a whole, for while all of the four major works that followed were humorous to a degree, in none did Chekhov overlay desperation and angst with such a barrage of laugh-out-loud comedy. That, in any event, is the impression you take away from Gerald Gutierrez's consistently funny Lincoln Center production, based on a splendidly idiomatic adaptation by playwright David Hare.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
David Mamet's A Life in the Theatre arrives at Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio 3 at just the right time. After a month when the world has been awash in horrors, this small backstage comedy gets back to basics and celebrates the people (two of them, anyway) who, for our escapist pleasure, make their lives out of make-believe. This play premiered in 1977, and you can practically feel the energy of Mamet's early successes, as he turns theater conventions inside out, all while working firmly within them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scandal is the intriguing new drama from Grey's Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes. It's built around one of the strongest (in every sense) female characters to hit prime time in recent memory. Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) is a former Oval Office insider who has formed a thriving, teeming crisis-management firm in Washington, D.C. With her frighteningly fast-talking staff (Henry Ian Cusick of Lost, Columbus Short, Darby Stanchfield, Katie Lowes, and Guillermo Diaz), she represents clients - a Russian diplomat, a Georgetown madame, a decorated military hero - caught in compromising positions.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Stephen Starr and chef Chris Painter are gearing up for the mid-October opening of their upscale, modern-Italian dinner spot, Il Pittore , at 2025 Sansom St., which until last weekend was Noble American Cookery . Painter, a Pottsville native and a vet of French Laundry and L'Espinasse , has been part of the Starr fold pretty much since 1999. He won raves at Tangerine and Angelina , and later became Starr's menu-development guy, credited with Parc , Frankford Hall , Pizzeria Stella , and the new Makoto in Miami.
NEWS
October 20, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What saves Fire on the Bayou, a musical revue that celebrates New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, from being a shameless marketing message is a good old standby: the truth. This show that weaves songs about the Big Easy, traditional standards of the South, fine-tuned tap dancing, and plenty of musical oomph is set into a framework that teeters in two ways. One: It threatens to devolve into a big, unconditional kiss, the sort that the New Orleans Visitors and Convention Bureau would be happy to plant, although the folks there would know better than to take two hours to deliver it. Two: It becomes rancidly sentimental, with a script that even throws God (or the absence of God, take your pick)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Terry Johnson's Hysteria, currently onstage at the Wilma Theater, is the kind of script that jumps off the page, crackling with electricity and potential. A precursor and very close cousin to Steve Martin's Picasso at the Lapin Agile, it imagines a meeting between those two champions of the unconscious mind Sigmund Freud and Salvador Dal?. Such a meeting did occur, after Freud fled Vienna for London in 1938, but it was probably far more prosaic than this farcical fantasia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Unless you've been trapped up a tree or stuck in an attic, you know that the Killers is Las Vegas' flashiest act since Siegfried & Roy. The seven-year-old quartet specializes in fast-forward American imagery in a driving synth-rock package with dressy singer/wordsmith Brandon Flowers providing the weirdly lyrical bow. "When we started and made the first album, there was the usual hunger bands have," Flowers says from a St. Louis tour stop....
NEWS
October 7, 2008 | By Lesley Valdes FOR THE INQUIRER
Pianist Leon Bates brought a fiery brio to his distinguished alumni recital for the Settlement Music School Sunday afternoon. The Philadelphian, who came to the Settlement at age 6, offered his audience at the Independence Seaport Museum substance, sentiment, and the technique to serve the music chosen. Beethoven's Sonata Op. 31, No. 3 in E-flat major opened - the tonic chords repetitive as birdcalls, the whimsies teasing. Each movement carved a niche. Bates' presence is cordial but his prowess is considerable.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
When you're ready for a Christmas shopping respite in the Cherry Hill area, drop into Brio Tuscan Grille, the most recent addition on the Haddonfield Road side of the former Garden State Park. You can sink into a comfortable booth on the faux Italian patio for a leisurely break, or take advantage of speedy, attentive service and resume the retail hunt as quickly as you'd like. This chain restaurant out of Columbus, Ohio, cheerfully caters to either option. Best of all, the food's tasty and interesting.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
1. You buy Amazing Bubbles by the gallon. 2. You can't remember your ATM password, but you know the channels of all the local public-TV stations. (12, 23, 35, 39). 3. You come to the sad realization that you actually have a favorite Teletubby. 4. You used to think the mess that children made with their food was disgusting. Now, you eat it. 5. Your child can't get into her bed at bedtime - because you've fallen asleep in it, waiting for her to come back from the bathroom.
NEWS
November 26, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Latin bombshell Shakira proved to be a fragmentation device Sunday night, blasting off in a thousand directions at the First Union Center. Alternating material from her Spanish-language albums with selections from Laundry Service, her current breakthrough record in English, the Colombian singer displayed a remarkable array of styles, from spare heartbreak hymns to stadium anthems. Traces of artists as disparate as Crystal Gayle and Alanis Morissette wafted through her delivery.
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