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NEWS
May 7, 1986 | By Rosemary Banks, Special to The Inquirer
Animal-rights activists protested outside the annual meeting of Bristol- Myers Co. stockholders yesterday, saying that the company blinds and poisons thousands of animals each year to market everything from Clairol hair color to Drano. "Animal life above profit," members of the Delaware Chapter of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) chanted as stockholders left the posh Hotel Du Pont. "Bristol-Myers doesn't want consumers to know that thousands of dogs, rabbits and guinea pigs, America's most cherished pets, were condemned to lingering deaths in labs last year," said Susan Brebner, local chapter president.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1986 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer
The latest advertising campaign by the makers of Nuprin pain reliever is giving Tylenol's manufacturer a headache. McNeiLab Inc., Tylenol's manufacturer, filed suit yesterday in U.S. District Court, seeking preliminary and permanent injunctions to stop Bristol- Myers Co. from airing television commercials that claim Nuprin is superior to longtime best-seller Extra-Strength Tylenol. U.S. District Judge Clifford Scott Green scheduled a hearing on the case for 10 a.m. Thursday for Bristol-Myers to defend its commercial.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
The manufacturer of Tylenol filed suit yesterday in U.S. District Court against Bristol-Myers Co. in an effort to stop the company from broadcasting a commercial suggesting that its painkiller, Nuprin, is more effective than Extra-Strength Tylenol. In the suit, McNeilab Inc., the Montgomery County company that makes Tylenol, contends that the commercial is likely to hurt the sale of Tylenol, which, it says has been the best-selling over-the-counter analgesic in the United States for the last several years.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
Warner-Lambert has filed a $55 million dollar lawsuit against Rohm and Haas, charging that the release of Warner's cholesterol-lowering drug was drastically delayed due to a contaminated ingredient it bought from the Philadelphia company. The suit seeks to recover lost profits and other damages resulting from the delayed launch of Cholybar, the new cholesterol-lowering "confectionary bar" marketed by the New Jersey-based Warner's Parke-Davis Group. The complaint, filed in New Jersey Superior Court in Morristown, alleges that Rohm and Haas sold cholestyramine resin - the active ingredient in Cholybar - that was adulterated with dicofol, a pesticide similar to DDT. Rohm & Haas' stock closed unchanged yesterday at $33. The complaint says Rohm and Haas notified Bristol-Myers - one of Warner's competitors - of the contamination a month before Warner was told.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among advertisers, it was regarded as a gentlemen's agreement. It was an understanding that said, in effect, that it was all right to hype your products and services - as long as your advertising claims weren't false or misleading. And if perchance you thought your competitor wasn't telling the truth or vice versa, a telephone call was all that was needed: The two of you resolved the matter between yourselves quietly - and inexpensively. Today, when the phone rings, you are more likely to say to your competitor, or your competitor to you: "See you in court.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Bristol-Myers Co. yesterday announced it would make a new drug available to people with AIDS at no cost although safety testing on the drug is not complete, according to published reports. DDI, or dideoxyinosine, appears to be effective but not dangerous like AZT, or azidothymidine, the only drug now licensed to treat AIDS, The New York Times and The Washington Post said in today's editions. The New York-based company's decision was hailed as a victory by advocates who have sought to give AIDS patients access to experimental drugs.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rohm & Haas Co. distributed a pesticide-laced chemical for use in anti- cholesterol products and waited months before warning its customers, a major drug company has charged in a civil suit. The Philadelphia-based chemical company concealed the contamination for up to three months and waited even longer before revealing "the true scope and seriousness of the problem," said the suit, filed by Warner-Lambert Co. It was one of two pharmaceutical companies using the Rohm & Haas chemical as an ingredient in its anti-cholesterol drug.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
A single question dominates any discussion of future prospects for SmithKline Beckman Corp: What will the Philadelphia-based company do to prolong the life of Tagamet, the world's best-selling prescription drug, when the patent on the ulcer medication expires in seven years? Tagamet, known chemically as cimetidine, generates more than a quarter of SmithKline's sales and half of the company's profits. When other top prescription drugs lost patent protection, new generic competitors siphoned sales and squeezed profit margins.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Patricia Marshall hurried past a line of stretch limousines, past a pair of executives and into the sumptuous wood lobby of the Hotel du Pont. Once through the doors, she disappeared in the well-tailored crowd assembling for the annual meeting of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Just a wisp of a figure in a sky-blue dress, she took a seat in the back of the hotel's gilded ballroom. This was familiar ground for Sister Patricia. This was the fourth time she had been here for a Bristol-Myers annual meeting.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Meyer, 75, an executive who once hawked toothpaste for Bristol-Myers and went on to manage how Sun Refining Co. marketed gasoline and A-Plus mini-marts, died Tuesday, May 14, of complications from cancer. A resident of Bryn Mawr and later Center City, Mr. Meyer had battled cancer for 13 years. He died at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In 1981, Mr. Meyer joined Sun Refining & Marketing Co. He was elevated to vice president of marketing and strategic development in 1989.
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NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Meyer, 75, an executive who once hawked toothpaste for Bristol-Myers and went on to manage how Sun Refining Co. marketed gasoline and A-Plus mini-marts, died Tuesday, May 14, of complications from cancer. A resident of Bryn Mawr and later Center City, Mr. Meyer had battled cancer for 13 years. He died at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In 1981, Mr. Meyer joined Sun Refining & Marketing Co. He was elevated to vice president of marketing and strategic development in 1989.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2005 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. agreed to pay $300 million toward satisfying a criminal securities fraud investigation yesterday as two former executives were accused of artificially inflating earnings in 2000 and 2001. The company, which has 7,000 employees in New Jersey, had been charged with a scheme called "channel-stuffing" that encouraged wholesalers to buy and store more prescription drugs than needed. The channel stuffing resulted in nearly $2 billion in excess inventory by the end of 2001, and created the illusion of a stronger bottom line for the company, federal authorities said.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said yesterday that it would close two local pharmaceutical research facilities as part of an effort to streamline its drug discovery process. The laboratories at DuPont's Experimental Station outside Wilmington and across the Delaware River in Deepwater, N.J., employ 655 and were part of Bristol-Myers' $7.8 billion purchase of DuPont Pharmaceuticals a year ago. Bristol-Myers, of New York, said it was consolidating its drug discovery operations in central New Jersey and Wallingford, Conn.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. tumbled to a 4 1/2-year low yesterday following a report that it has had preliminary merger discussions with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Executives from each company met in the Princeton offices of Bristol-Myers in the last two weeks, Hemant Shah, independent drug industry analyst in Warren, N.J., said. "I have sources who said they have met," Shah said in a telephone interview. Glaxo, of London, has its U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia and North Carolina.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | By Andrea Knox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. has agreed to sell its pharmaceutical unit to Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. for $7.8 billion, a deal that would strengthen Bristol-Myers' product line while giving DuPont leeway to invest in its other businesses and to buy back stock. Bristol-Myers expects to complete the purchase of the DuPont unit, which makes the AIDS drug Sustiva and the clot-buster Coumadin, by Dec. 31. The major immediate benefit for Bristol-Myers would be its acquisition of these two drugs, which complement the company's own Videx and Zerit for HIV and Pravachol for high cholesterol.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Usually tripping over itself to keep up with the novel and the new, the suburban exhibition scene this week is, surprisingly, dominated by a retrospective display of sculpture that corporate America is sponsoring. For the current Bristol-Myers Squibb Worldwide Medicines Group headquarters was built decades ago with an unusual feature, a 5,560-square-foot art gallery overlooking a 12-acre lake on its Lawrenceville, N.J., campus three miles south of Princeton. Like clockwork ever since, it has kept that showcase active with one exhibit after another.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | By Susan Warner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. yesterday said it would slash African prices for two AIDS drugs and allow other manufacturers to produce copies of the patented medicines in Africa. Bristol-Myers was the third major pharmaceutical company to recently cut prices for its AIDS drugs in response to demands to make the drugs more affordable on the continent hardest hit by AIDS. Bristol-Myers and Yale University, which holds the patent on one of the drugs, was being pressured to sharply reduce prices or allow generic drugmakers to do so. "We seek no profits on AIDS drugs in Africa, and we will not let our patents be an obstacle," John L. McGoldrick, executive vice president of Bristol-Myers Squibb, said in a statement from the company's New York headquarters.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | By Karen Masterson and Melody McDonald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
James T. Kassel Jr. of Medford Lakes, a frequent business flier who leaves a wife and a 4-year-old son, was a passenger on Swissair Flight 111 when it went down Wednesday night over Nova Scotia. He was on a business trip to Geneva, Switzerland, for his employer, New York-based Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.. Kassel, 34, who worked in the company's Princeton office, was a senior manager specializing in worldwide meetings management. "I was the one who heard it," said his sister Kelly Gardler of Concord.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Timothy E. Skinner, 45, of Middletown Township, Bucks County, a manager for Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., died Friday at the Princeton Medical Center. He had been playing golf on a nearby course when he collapsed after an apparent heart attack. A native of Winchester, Ind., Mr. Skinner graduated in 1970 from Winchester Community High School and earned his bachelor's degree in 1975 from the University of Evansville in Indiana. For the last year, Mr. Skinner was the category leader of transportation and global strategic sourcing at Bristol-Myers' Princeton facility.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. yesterday announced a major expansion that will bring approximately 2,000 new high-paying research jobs to the Princeton area in the next five years. Key to those hires are plans to purchase a 433-acre research and office complex in Hopewell Township, about five miles from the drug company's Pharmaceutical Research Institute in Princeton. The Hopewell property is to be purchased from Mobil Technology Co. for $41.7 million. It would house a new research site that would be in addition to Princeton, where new laboratory facilities will also be built, a company spokeswoman said.
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