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Bristol Myers Squibb

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BUSINESS
January 5, 1994 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. yesterday said it would increase the number of jobs it was eliminating to 5,000 - or almost 10 percent of the pharmaceutical company's worldwide workforce - as part of a restructuring program to improve its competitiveness. The decision to cut 3,500 more jobs within two years comes just after the firm reduced its head count by 1,500 people through a voluntary retirement program. Although not included in yesterday's tally, Bristol-Myers shed 2,200 jobs a year ago. "This restructuring is in response to a rapidly changing marketplace which has only intensified in the last year," said Jane Kramer, a company spokeswoman.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The family of a computer engineer who was fatally poisoned has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit alleging that Bristol-Myers Squibb and the University Medical Center at Princeton were negligent and contributed to his death. The lawsuit, made public Thursday, comes less than four months after Tianle Li, 40, a chemist who worked for the pharmaceutical giant for a decade, was charged with the murder of her husband, Xiaoye Wang, 39, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania who came from China to the United States seeking a better life.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1992 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cabot Medical Corp., of Langhorne, said yesterday that it would acquire the urological business of the Surgitek subsidiary of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. The agreement stipulates that Bristol-Myers will receive a cash payment of $57 million and 225,000 warrants to buy Cabot Medical stock at $16 per share. The companies said they expected that the deal would be completed by the end of the year. Warren Wood, Cabot Medical's chairman and chief executive officer, said the purchase would help his firm achieve its long-range plan of becoming a leader in the medical-device business.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Pennsylvania impressionist paintings are to the American mass audience what the electrification of the Pennsylvania Railroad linking New York City and Philadelphia was in the early 1900s for passengers used to the more complicated technology of the steam engine. Local suburbanites at the time cheered when informed how much easier and smoother that new ride would be. By the same token, the public is getting the message that Pennsylvania impressionism is an easygoing, good-looking and unaggressive sort of art. Such qualities are cherished now more than ever, in part because they capture the unspoiled and appealing vistas of natural landscape and farms as seen before suburban sprawl surrrounded us. Still, for many a living artist eager for recognition of his or her own work and a tad envious perhaps of all the renewed excitement over Bucks County art of nearly a century ago, that attention is mere garnish: a fancy sauce on an otherwise tough and plain old bistro dish.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2001 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said yesterday that 1,070 former DuPont Co. pharmaceutical division workers in the Wilmington, Philadelphia and South Jersey region will be laid off effective Dec. 31. Bristol-Myers, which bought DuPont's pharmaceutical unit last month, said it had offered jobs to 930 of 2,000 former DuPont workers in Wilmington, Deepwater, N.J., and Glenolden, Pa. A company spokesman said 240 of the 930 jobs would require workers to...
BUSINESS
October 17, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said yesterday that it would close two local pharmaceutical research facilities as part of an effort to streamline its drug discovery process. The laboratories at DuPont's Experimental Station outside Wilmington and across the Delaware River in Deepwater, N.J., employ 655 and were part of Bristol-Myers' $7.8 billion purchase of DuPont Pharmaceuticals a year ago. Bristol-Myers, of New York, said it was consolidating its drug discovery operations in central New Jersey and Wallingford, Conn.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | By Susan Warner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. yesterday said it would slash African prices for two AIDS drugs and allow other manufacturers to produce copies of the patented medicines in Africa. Bristol-Myers was the third major pharmaceutical company to recently cut prices for its AIDS drugs in response to demands to make the drugs more affordable on the continent hardest hit by AIDS. Bristol-Myers and Yale University, which holds the patent on one of the drugs, was being pressured to sharply reduce prices or allow generic drugmakers to do so. "We seek no profits on AIDS drugs in Africa, and we will not let our patents be an obstacle," John L. McGoldrick, executive vice president of Bristol-Myers Squibb, said in a statement from the company's New York headquarters.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | BY DAVID KIRK
As if our daily doses of news haven't contained enough testosterone, the drug wars came to a climax of sorts this month. Some organs, it seems, can rise more quickly to the top of an editor's list. I'm quite firm about this. My argument will stand up. It's just not that hard to see what's on editors' minds. If you were unconscious, you missed learning that the Food & Drug Administration has approved Pfizer's Viagra, a new pill that could get 30 million impotent men to lie down and cheer.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's good for some can be bad for others, and that maxim was demonstrated again last week with the release of the annual National Health Expenditures analysis. Though America spent just shy of $2.8 trillion in 2012 on health-care spending, the rate of growth was essentially flat, continuing a four-year trend, according to the study by the federal government's Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, published in   the journal Health Affairs. That is the longest period of slow or no growth in the 53-year history of the analysis.
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NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Taliaferro, known for his against-the-odds recovery after a spinal-cord injury as a Pennsylvania State University football player, has been selected to fill former New Jersey Assemblywoman Celeste Riley's seat, Democratic officials said Thursday. Taliaferro, a Gloucester County freeholder, received endorsements from the Democratic committees in Gloucester, Salem, and Cumberland Counties to fill the Third District seat. "This opportunity arose, and for me, it was truly an exciting opportunity to really expand what we've been doing on the freeholder level, to bring it up to the state level," said Taliaferro, 33, of Woolwich.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shares of DuPont Co. rose more than 5 percent Wednesday, to $69.25, after billionaire investor Nelson Peltz 's Trian Partners dropped the polite public mask he held up when he started accumulating shares last year and made it clear that he's had it with CEO Ellen Kullman 's resistance to his scheme to break apart the Wilmington manufacturer in hopes of fat shareholder payouts. Peltz and his partners, who specialize in squeezing big, old companies like H.J. Heinz and Pepsico , also vented disgust with DuPont corporate spending on "bureaucracy" and century-old hometown perks like the 217-room Hotel du Pont , the 1,252-seat DuPont Theatre , and the DuPont Country Club , with its three golf courses near the company's Wilmington headquarters.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014
The Philadelphia Police Foundation , a nonprofit organization that supports the Philadelphia Police Department, named the following board members:     Paul K. Leary Jr. , attorney and member of the litigation department at Cozen O'Connor, Philadelphia; Stephen Olitsky , chief executive officer and president of B&B Wealth Management L.L.C., Gwynedd Valley; Tamar Olitsky , chief executive officer and president of the Olitsky Family...
BUSINESS
January 12, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's good for some can be bad for others, and that maxim was demonstrated again last week with the release of the annual National Health Expenditures analysis. Though America spent just shy of $2.8 trillion in 2012 on health-care spending, the rate of growth was essentially flat, continuing a four-year trend, according to the study by the federal government's Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, published in   the journal Health Affairs. That is the longest period of slow or no growth in the 53-year history of the analysis.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drugmaker AstraZeneca P.L.C. said Monday that it had agreed to pay up to $1.15 billion for Pearl Therapeutics Inc., a privately held company based in Redwood City, Calif. Pearl's research focus is inhaled medication for respiratory diseases, specifically chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AstraZeneca is based in the United Kingdom but has operations in Wilmington and Newark, Del. AstraZeneca is trying to rebuild its portfolio after several blockbuster drugs lost patent protection, which translates to lower revenue because lower-cost generic competitors are allowed to enter the market.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drugmaker Shire P.L.C. said Thursday it had halted plans to build a campus in Malvern and would remain in the Chesterbrook Corporate Center in Wayne. Shire is among the pharmaceutical companies of various sizes trying to reorganize in ways to meet investor demands for growth in revenue, profit, and stock price. Based in the United Kingdom, Shire accepted $3.45 million in state money to settle in Chesterbrook in 2004 with about 100 employees. In August, then-chief executive officer Angus Russell told The Inquirer that the 1,100 employees now there needed more room than the 425,000 square feet spread over four buildings.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kurt W. Klein, 51, of Springfield, Delaware County, a claims adjuster and former director for the St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Youth Organization Athletic Program, died Wednesday, May 15, at home of complications from sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disease. Since 1992, Mr. Klein was employed by Professional Insurance Adjusters in Malvern, and before that by Bristol-Myers Squibb in Princeton. He never retired, said his son, Kurt D. Klein. But his true passion was the role he played as athletic director for the St. Francis of Assisi CYO program, starting in 1998, his family said.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2012 | By David Sell and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drugmakers AstraZeneca P.L.C. and GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., both of which are based in the United Kingdom and have big operations in the Philadelphia region, have tried in the last few days to add external pieces to their pharmaceutical portfolios. Monday was the first day of stock trading after the Friday night announcement that Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. would acquire Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc., and the role that AstraZeneca would play in the multipronged deal worth about $7 billion.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press
TRENTON - A generic-drug maker has paid nearly $445 million to end a decadelong patent-infringement battle with two pharmaceutical heavyweights over the blood thinner Plavix. Apotex Corp., Canada's biggest drugmaker, has paid Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Sanofi SA, the brand-name drugmakers that jointly sell Plavix, $442.2 million in damages ordered over its improper sales of a generic version of Plavix in 2006. Apotex also paid $1.26 million in interest on that judgment and $900,000 in legal costs.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2011
Smart Devine & Co. L.L.C. has hired Chris Barbier as director of technology services in the firm's business-advisory practice. Barbier had been vice president at JP Morgan Private Equity/Real Estate Fund Services. Stephen W. Krouse has been hired as chief human resources officer at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children . Krouse had been the human resources director at Hahnemann University Hospital. Campbell Soup Co. , Camden, has hired Joshua Anthony , vice president, global nutrition and health.
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