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NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
SOUTHAMPTON, England - Somewhere between the black Titanic teddy bears and the pale Iceberg beer, the Titanic Barbie doll and the "Tubtanic" bath plug, the global obsession with the story of the doomed ocean liner began to border on the absurd. A new museum opening Tuesday in the English port city of Southampton has taken this into account, explaining how the world has reported, retold, and sometimes become utterly fixated on the fateful night in April 1912 that saw the White Star liner sink beneath the waves.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Scientists from the British Museum say they have used new tests to prove the authenticity of one their most famous fossils, which had been the subject of recent charges that it was fabricated in an elaborate 19th-century hoax. The scientists were defending the honor of their museum's Archaeopteryx lithographica fossil, which many scientists believe establishes an evolutionary link between reptiles and birds. Last year, another group of scientists - led by the well-known British astronomer Fred Hoyle - had argued in a magazine article that the Archaeopteryx fossil was a forgery.
NEWS
September 13, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taylor Swift has absolved Kanye West of last year's onstage sin with one somber song. The 20-year-old delivered a poignant and powerful ode about West at Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles that instead of criticizing him, sympathized with his difficult time in the spotlight. "Thirty-two and still growing up now; who you are is not what you did," she sang softly, adding: "You're still an innocent. " Swift's dramatic performance delivered on the hype promised from a sequel to last year's incident in which West marred Swift's acceptance speech for best female video by jumping onstage and insisting the award should have gone to Beyoncé.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Sri Lanka faulted in war carnage NEW DELHI - A U.N. panel investigating allegations of war crimes by Sri Lankan troops during the bloody final battle against the rebel Tamil Tigers in May 2009 found credible evidence that government soldiers targeted civilians, shelled hospitals, and attacked aid workers, according to an unauthorized copy of the panel's report. "Tens of thousands lost their lives from January to May 2009, many of whom died anonymously in the carnage of the final few days," the report said, significantly increasing the U.N. estimate for the civilian death toll.
LIVING
November 24, 1998 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deep in a labyrinth of rooms seen by few people, American researcher Theodore Kwasman picked up a small piece of ancient clay tablet, set it alongside another piece, and knew immediately that he had hit a Mesopotamian jackpot. Put together, the two pieces of clay formed the long-missing first lines of the Epic of Gilgamesh, a 4,000-year-old work regarded as the world's first epic poem. It's the Gilgamesh story that gives us one of the first written accounts of a Great Flood and a Noah-type character who survives it. Kwasman was elated with his discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
"Quantico" star gives back Bollywood star and former Miss World Priyanka Chopra , best known here as lovable terror suspect/FBI trainee Alex Parrish in ABC's Quantico , is sending 70 kids - 50 of them girls - to school in her native India. Oh, she also covers their health care. "I know each kid. It's very personal," Chopra tells Glamour mag. Chopra, 33, donates 10 percent of earnings to a foundation she set up a decade ago after learning her housekeeper could afford to send only her son to school, not her daughter.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret Feurer Plass, 94, a passionate collector of primitive African art who traveled the world from Society Hill to Uagadougou and earned the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for her work, died Saturday in her home off Rittenhouse Square. Known as Margo to her friends, Mrs. Plass once summed up her peripatetic life for an interviewer: "I got it allllll in. That's what I want on my tombstone: 'She got it all in.' " She was the daughter of Margaret "Madge" Barton and Carl Feurer, a wealthy amateur archaeologist and art instructor.
LIVING
March 16, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The board of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts has hired a new president/chief executive, as well as a new executive director/provost. Joshua C. Thompson, a former banker who had been acting chief operating officer of the school and museum, was named president. He succeeds Gresham Riley, who announced his resignation more than a year ago. The academy's new executive director/provost will be Derek Anthony Gillman, a deputy director of the National Gallery of Victoria, in Melbourne, Australia.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Beginning Monday, Philadelphia will become the center of the Sumerian universe when nearly 300 Assyriologists descend on the Penn Museum for four days of hobnobbing, scholarly presentations, receptions, and Sumerian scuttlebutt. The Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania will be hosting the 62nd Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, the worldwide association of scholarly Mesopotamian enthusiasts, and a very big deal indeed. It is only the fifth time since its 1950 founding that the organization has held its annual gathering in the United States, and the second time it has been to Penn.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Beginning Monday, Philadelphia will become the center of the Sumerian universe when nearly 300 Assyriologists descend on the Penn Museum for four days of hobnobbing, scholarly presentations, receptions, and Sumerian scuttlebutt. The Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania will be hosting the 62nd Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, the worldwide association of scholarly Mesopotamian enthusiasts, and a very big deal indeed. It is only the fifth time since its 1950 founding that the organization has held its annual gathering in the United States, and the second time it has been to Penn.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
"Quantico" star gives back Bollywood star and former Miss World Priyanka Chopra , best known here as lovable terror suspect/FBI trainee Alex Parrish in ABC's Quantico , is sending 70 kids - 50 of them girls - to school in her native India. Oh, she also covers their health care. "I know each kid. It's very personal," Chopra tells Glamour mag. Chopra, 33, donates 10 percent of earnings to a foundation she set up a decade ago after learning her housekeeper could afford to send only her son to school, not her daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia and history go together like the Fourth of July and fireworks, like pretzels and mustard, like Hall and Oates. Philadelphia and American history, that is. World history? The connection isn't so obvious. But when DK Publishing and the Smithsonian Institution set out recently to tell the story of humankind through 1,000 objects, on the premise that humans define themselves by what they make, they turned to the Penn Museum for much of their material. More than 200 of the objects photographed for the book are from the Penn collection - and many of them are on display for you to see. The red-brick building, in the shadow of Franklin Field between 32d and 33d Streets, houses a world-class assemblage of about a million artifacts, from Egyptian mummies to Chinese statues to pottery fashioned in Central America 2,000 years before the arrival of Europeans.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Monge knew for years that the Penn Museum had quite the skeleton in its closet, a box of bones supinely displayed, carefully encased in wax, wrapped in burlap, and positioned on a board. "Somebody took great pains to take a very fragmentary skeleton and bring it here," said Monge, the curator who oversees the physical anthropology section of the museum in University City. "Therefore, it must be important. " There was no catalog card or identifying information. So the skeleton sat obscurely for years in a ground-floor storage room at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GILLIAN WAKELY grew up in England, where her parents' idea of a fun time was to visit a museum. When she arrived in America, she came upon a photograph in an art-history book of the "Ram in a Thicket. " The anthropologically hip know of it as an exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It's the statue of a ram (more likely a goat) dug up in 1928 in the Royal Tombs of Ur in southern Iraq. Gillian knew about the 4,000-year-old figure because it was one of two found in Ur. The other was in the British Museum in London.
TRAVEL
February 11, 2013 | By Barbara Katzman, For The Inquirer
My husband and I have five grandchildren who do not live near us. Several years ago, we decided it would be great to get to know them better (and them us) by taking each one individually on a one-week trip. Last year, we made our first such excursion, to London with 10-year-old Jonathan. Of course, we got normal (and understandable) motherly warnings from our daughter: He gets height fright; he can't wait to get to a restaurant to have breakfast; no matter what time he goes to bed, he will awaken by 7; and so on. Well, off we went.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
SOUTHAMPTON, England - Somewhere between the black Titanic teddy bears and the pale Iceberg beer, the Titanic Barbie doll and the "Tubtanic" bath plug, the global obsession with the story of the doomed ocean liner began to border on the absurd. A new museum opening Tuesday in the English port city of Southampton has taken this into account, explaining how the world has reported, retold, and sometimes become utterly fixated on the fateful night in April 1912 that saw the White Star liner sink beneath the waves.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Sri Lanka faulted in war carnage NEW DELHI - A U.N. panel investigating allegations of war crimes by Sri Lankan troops during the bloody final battle against the rebel Tamil Tigers in May 2009 found credible evidence that government soldiers targeted civilians, shelled hospitals, and attacked aid workers, according to an unauthorized copy of the panel's report. "Tens of thousands lost their lives from January to May 2009, many of whom died anonymously in the carnage of the final few days," the report said, significantly increasing the U.N. estimate for the civilian death toll.
NEWS
September 13, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taylor Swift has absolved Kanye West of last year's onstage sin with one somber song. The 20-year-old delivered a poignant and powerful ode about West at Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles that instead of criticizing him, sympathized with his difficult time in the spotlight. "Thirty-two and still growing up now; who you are is not what you did," she sang softly, adding: "You're still an innocent. " Swift's dramatic performance delivered on the hype promised from a sequel to last year's incident in which West marred Swift's acceptance speech for best female video by jumping onstage and insisting the award should have gone to Beyoncé.
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