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NEWS
March 22, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
If you went by the stories out of London that appeared in some American dailies, you're probably under the impression that 50 million Britons were plunged into a deep funk because President Clinton shook the hand of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams. Don't you believe it. The majority of those economically distressed mainland Brits wouldn't care whose hand gets clasped if it hastens the day when they no longer have to worry about the "bloody Oirish. " It was Prime Minister John Major who was so shook up that he ducked phone calls from Clinton for a week because the president was civil to the man who first sparked the peace process in Northern Ireland by getting the Irish Republican Army to declare its cease-fire.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is difficult to say whether the recent headline-grabbing tale of Blackie the donkey stems more from the British obsession with animals in distress or from Fleet Street's obsession with itself. There's ample historical evidence for both. This is, after all, a nation that will rally to even the faintest signal of a bird or mammal in need. A nation that invented the term "animal welfare" and now has refined it to an art. A nation that generously supports such charities as the Mule Society, the National Fancy Rat Society, the British Hedgehog Preservation Society, and the Tortoise Trust.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Living in a $1.2 million Westminster apartment despite a meager salary as a House of Commons researcher, showing up at the smartest parties dressed in designer finery and squired by the rich and famous, pouty-lipped Pamella Bordes, 27, cut quite a swath through London society, sometimes literally. When the former Miss India broke up with one middle-aged suitor, she reportedly took scissors to his suits, snipping out the crotches and armpits. The aggrieved party was one Andrew Neil, the editor of the once-august Sunday Times (now a bit declasse after its purchase by Australian-American press magnate Rupert Murdoch)
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Heralded as the advance guard of the rave revival, the Klaxons of Manchester, England, arrived at the First Unitarian Church on Tuesday night riding a wave of ecstasy. A year's worth of hype as only the British press can muster culminated in the Mercury Prize last month, when the band's Myths of the Near Future beat out the widely favored British retro-soul singer Amy Winehouse. But despite the few glow sticks tracing their way through the steamy air and the eponymous sirens scattered through their songs, the Klaxons sound less like the second coming of the Happy Mondays than kin to the recent wave of British guitar bands, including last year's Mercury winner, the Arctic Monkeys.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1986 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
When British investigative reporters go to work - they dig up juicy sex scandals, rather than financial skullduggery. Just this past Sunday, Jeffrey Archer, chairman of the Conservative Party in England, resigned his post after a Sunday tabloid disclosed that he had made a payoff to a prostitute. Archer, who is best known in this country as the author of best-selling novels ("Kane and Abel," "First Among Equals") denies having had a relationship with the lady. His story is that she called him to complain about being badgered by reporters who wanted her to claim she was sleeping with him. And that he was merely being a decent fellow when he "foolishly" gave her money so that she could ago abroad to avoid them.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | BY CAL THOMAS
Neil Kinnock, leader of Britain's Labor Party, has become a pretty popular fellow among American Democratic politicians. First, Joe Biden plagiarized parts of a Kinnock speech. And now Michael Dukakis is adapting Kinnock's campaign strategy in hopes it will work better on the western side of the Atlantic. As the British press has noted, the similarities are striking between the liberal Kinnock's failed attempt last year to dethrone the Conservative Party leader and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Dukakis's goal to end eight years of conservative Republican dominance of the White House.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | by Thomas Beller, New York Times
Hugh Grant's public embarrassment distressed many of his fans and gave the rest of the English-speaking world a sugar rush of Schadenfreude. Not only was the floppy-haired star caught with a prostitute in a BMW on Hollywood's Sunset Boulevard, he had the exquisite sense of timing to do it on the eve of his new feel-good comedy, "Nine Months. " Pleasure in the misery of others is not the healthiest of emotions, but given this set of circumstances it seems forgivable. Sex is rivaled only by shame for the public's attention, and this story has both, with fame and beauty thrown in - not to mention a perfume called "Pleasures," which his girlfriend, Elizabeth Hurley, is promoting.
NEWS
February 6, 1993
To the casual observer, there aren't many jobs better than being Her Majesty, Queen of England. There are virtually no duties. The pay is great. All your useless relatives get on the public payroll. An enormous staff of titled twits takes care of your every want. And people begin groveling at the mere hint of your presence. All you have to do in return is wear a hat and carry a purse. The job has lost a little cachet over the years. You don't get to declare wars or behead subjects, but you don't have to worry about much of anything because you are responsible for nothing.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By D. O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This includes information from the New York Daily News, Associated Press and USA Today
Is it possible that Michael Jackson is even more eccentric than the world ever imagined? Could be. Jackson's former housekeepers Mark and Faye Quindoy will appear on Geraldo Rivera's TV talk show today to reveal that Jackson wears stage makeup all day long, scribbles songs on his bedsheets, pays an employee $28.50 an hour to change his monkeys' disposable diapers, and eats specialty dishes named for Disney characters. "We never saw him without his makeup on. He would do it (put it on)
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, USA Today and the Washington Post
Hello, 1988. After a big night of partying New Year's Eve, the presidential family is expected to do some more entertaining today to welcome the year. President Reagan will sing Gershwin and a few Irish folk songs for 30 friends at the palatial Palm Springs, Calif., residence of the Reagans' buddies Walter and Leonore Annenberg. He's scheduled to be accompanied by celebrated New York cabaret pianist Michael Feinstein, who is being flown in for the occasion. More than 100 revelers were invited to yesterday's soiree, including Malcolm Forbes, Bob Hope and Brooke Astor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
New box sets are always plentiful this time of year - appropriate and pleasing gifts for the music lover on your shopping list. This season, though, we sense extra urgency in the release patterns as the "packaged goods" music business continues its decline. Labels are bundling more crown jewels into "complete" collections of CDs. And dishing some true-blue rarities, music and music videos (on DVD and Bluray) so long gone, there'd been speculation the stuff might not even exist anymore.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Heralded as the advance guard of the rave revival, the Klaxons of Manchester, England, arrived at the First Unitarian Church on Tuesday night riding a wave of ecstasy. A year's worth of hype as only the British press can muster culminated in the Mercury Prize last month, when the band's Myths of the Near Future beat out the widely favored British retro-soul singer Amy Winehouse. But despite the few glow sticks tracing their way through the steamy air and the eponymous sirens scattered through their songs, the Klaxons sound less like the second coming of the Happy Mondays than kin to the recent wave of British guitar bands, including last year's Mercury winner, the Arctic Monkeys.
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sure sign it's finally spring? Those very pink-hued, (sometimes sickly) sweet musical ads for the Gap starring American darling Sarah Jessica Parker and her rendition of the Broadway tune "I Enjoy Being a Girl. " But the British press is reporting that S.J.P., who's done three Gap campaigns so far, will do no more. It appears that Gap's face and voice are to be replaced by English teen sensation Joss Stone, who's currently in negotiations with the khaki-maker. According to London's Sunday Times, the Gap, which had previously used Madonna and Demi Moore, wants to capture the teen market by using the 17-year-old soul singer, who scored a hit last year with "Fell in Love with a Boy," a reworking of the White Stripes' "Fell in Love with a Girl.
LIVING
January 2, 1998 | By J.A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press, Reuters, Washington Post and Daily Telegraph contributed to this story
Philly's own Fresh Prince Will Smith is making a fresh start for the new year after marrying actress Jada Pinkett in a ceremony at a mansion outside Baltimore. "They were married [Wednesday] night at 8:25 p.m.," Smith's mouthpiece Stan Rosenfield told us yesterday. The couple have no immediate plans for a honeymoon because Smith is shooting a film called Enemy of the State in Baltimore, Rosenfield said. Security was tight at the Cloisters, a mansion north of Baltimore, where the nuptials were performed before a collection of film and TV stars who arrived in a stream of limos.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Daily Mail published an 80-page special edition yesterday with Diana in jeans and rolled-up shirtsleeves on its cover. The Mirror, another tabloid, featured her in tiara and pearls on its cover, and had more than 40 pages inside. The Guardian, a broadsheet, gave Diana its front page - solemn soldiers in white gloves carrying her coffin draped in the Royal Standard of the United Kingdom - and 16 full pages inside. And the Daily Telegraph published 32 pages, including a special section, with a full-page picture on the back of Diana and her two boys.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | by Thomas Beller, New York Times
Hugh Grant's public embarrassment distressed many of his fans and gave the rest of the English-speaking world a sugar rush of Schadenfreude. Not only was the floppy-haired star caught with a prostitute in a BMW on Hollywood's Sunset Boulevard, he had the exquisite sense of timing to do it on the eve of his new feel-good comedy, "Nine Months. " Pleasure in the misery of others is not the healthiest of emotions, but given this set of circumstances it seems forgivable. Sex is rivaled only by shame for the public's attention, and this story has both, with fame and beauty thrown in - not to mention a perfume called "Pleasures," which his girlfriend, Elizabeth Hurley, is promoting.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
If you went by the stories out of London that appeared in some American dailies, you're probably under the impression that 50 million Britons were plunged into a deep funk because President Clinton shook the hand of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams. Don't you believe it. The majority of those economically distressed mainland Brits wouldn't care whose hand gets clasped if it hastens the day when they no longer have to worry about the "bloody Oirish. " It was Prime Minister John Major who was so shook up that he ducked phone calls from Clinton for a week because the president was civil to the man who first sparked the peace process in Northern Ireland by getting the Irish Republican Army to declare its cease-fire.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
Has Britain been putting the heat on President Clinton to avoid a face-to- face meeting with Northern Ireland's Gerry Adams? Adams says yes, the White House says no, and the London government isn't saying anything. But the British press is already congratulating Prime Minister John Major for scoring "a propaganda victory" by seeing to it that neither Clinton nor Vice President Al Gore will meet Adams. As most Americans are aware by now, Adams is president of Sinn Fein, the political party of the Irish Republican movement.
SPORTS
August 12, 1994 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Two months ago, Scotland's Colin Montgomerie made it into a three-way, 18- hole playoff at the U.S. Open. Then he stumbled, bumbled and rumbled to a 7-over-par 78 on a sweltering Monday at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. He was four strokes worse than Loren Roberts and Ernie Els, who eventually won on the second hole of sudden death. Montgomerie, 31, whom the British press has often criticized for not having enough fire in his belly, wasn't about to let that crash-and-burn derail a promising career.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | By RICHARD REEVES
"Britain Threatens Serbs With Air Strikes Ultimatum," was the headline of the Times of London report on Tuesday of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's summit meeting, which marked President Clinton's first official trip to Europe. The story, only six paragraphs long, ran at the bottom of the front page of the paper, next to an advertisement for NEC laser printers. Above the NATO report, covering three-quarters of the front page, were three long stories on sex and the Conservative Party government of Prime Minister John Major.
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