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NEWS
April 1, 2003 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
British coalition forces are sweeping up hundreds of low-level members of Saddam Hussein's Baath Party throughout southern Iraq to stop guerrilla attacks and win the confidence of average Iraqis. But relatives of some of those arrested say the British are targeting innocent people with no ties to the Iraqi army or Hussein's Baathist regime. "They broke through our front door and came in with machine guns," said Fatya Mohammed, 49, sobbing. "They took my son and husband. They are not with the Baathists.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The Irish Republican Army vowed today to wage "unceasing war" against Britain after a guerrilla bomb blew up at a festive foot race packed with people, killing six British soldiers and wounding 10 civilians. The IRA's Belfast Brigade claimed responsibility for last night's bombing - the guerrilla group's deadliest attack in seven months - in a statement today to news media in Belfast. IRA guerrillas slipped into the predominantly Protestant town of Lisburn, headquarters of the British Army in Northern Ireland, and wired a bomb containing seven pounds of explosives to an unmarked army van, the statement said.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Jon Stephenson, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Six British soldiers were believed killed when an explosion struck their armored vehicle, marking the biggest loss of life for British forces in Afghanistan in years, officials in London said Wednesday. The explosion a day earlier in the southern province of Helmand figured to renew calls for an earlier withdrawal from Afghanistan for international forces, which have faced increasing violence as they try to hand security responsibilities to Afghan forces before the end of 2014.
NEWS
May 6, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Fourteen months after following the United States into war in Iraq, the British are struggling with an Iraqi prisoner-abuse scandal of their own, and while the details and evidence are in dispute, the consequences could be as serious. In the last week, the British have gone from horrified observers to full participants in a scandal that has topped newspapers and newscasts around the world. And while the breadth of accusations against the United States is greater, the British fear that their world image and the safety of their troops still in Iraq have been endangered by recent revelations.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It's coming up on 20 years since the first non-violent civil rights march in Irish history uncorked the demons of reaction that have ravaged the British-occupied Six Counties in the north ever since. In all that time, you'd think at least one major U.S. newspaper would have shown some respect for the 46 million Americans who claim Irish ancestry by stationing a first-rate journalist permanently in Belfast to report what the hell is really going on over there. Instead, the U.S. press has been generally content to accept simplistic and frequently misleading accounts from the wire services, as filed by unenterprising and often biased reporters, who are beholden to police and British military information officers for the invariably self-serving official daily handouts.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press and Reuters
As many as 6,200 British troops, 2,000 U.S. Marines and 2,000 French forces were heading toward the Adriatic coast of Croatia yesterday, apparently with only the vaguest of plans as to what they will do when they get there. The show of force is the latest reaction to the standoff between the United Nations and Bosnian Serbs, who are holding more than 350 U.N. peacekeepers hostage in Bosnia. In Washington, Anthony Lake, President Clinton's national security adviser, described the deployment as a "precautionary measure" and said that "no decision has been made yet to send them into combat.
NEWS
March 24, 2003 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi lieutenant colonel began to cry yesterday when a cameraman tried to record his surrender to British soldiers near this dusty southern Iraqi town. He said his family was in Baghdad. Then he made a slitting motion against his throat. "There are still a lot of Saddam's supporters here," said the officer, who was too terrified to give his name. As U.S.-led coalition troops push toward Baghdad, they are leaving behind pockets of insecurity in southern Iraq, where Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's agents continue to wield power and intimidate the local populace.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gunfire sprayed across the road one day this week, forcing British soldiers to dive into ditches. Frightened Iraqi civilians sat tight in their cars as a calm, boyish-faced British soldier pumped a round at Iraqi militia fighters on the roof of a munitions factory. "Call this Machine Gun Alley," said a grinning Cpl. Richie Strickland of the First Battalion, Irish Guards regiment as he crawled to see if the Iraqis would fire back. Here at this checkpoint near Basra, Iraq's besieged southern regional capital, British soldiers are fighting a familiar war. Many are veterans of urban conflicts in Northern Ireland, Bosnia and Kosovo, where having a light touch to win over skeptical civilians was as important as having a heavy hand with the enemy.
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Iraqi troops fired machine guns and artillery shells at several hundred refugees fleeing Basra yesterday, triggering a shoot-out with British soldiers that pinned terrified refugees in the cross fire. Mothers in black Islamic garments clutched crying babies to their chests. Young men tightly held the hands of their grandmothers. And an old, sun-weathered man with a cane briefly looked to the heavens and yelled, "Allah. God help me. " British forces on the outskirts of Basra are facing an Iraqi guerrilla campaign that is dragging them into an urban, low-tech war in which civilians are human shields and the enemy is not easily distinguishable.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The charred and twisted hulk of a blue van still littered a downtown street here yesterday - a reminder of the Irish Republican Army's latest strike in its escalating war against regular British army forces. Six off-duty British soldiers, who had driven the van down from their base in Londonderry to join 4,000 others in a 13-mile charity "fun run," died in the blast at sundown Wednesday. All were regular army soldiers from Britain, rather than Irish-born members of the Ulster Defense Regiment, who have handled many military chores in the province since the early 1970s under a policy of "Ulsterization.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
  Once again, BalletX has delivered on its promise to present challenging new work performed by top-notch dancers. The troupe's winter series, which premiered Wednesday, consists of four pieces - including world, national, and company premieres - by choreographers from the United States, the Philippines, and Spain. The evening's emotional high point was "Triptych," by Val Caniparoli. Inspired by photos of British soldiers who served in Afghanistan, the dancers leap, crawl, and occasionally execute stylized military movements, first to contemplative string music by Alexander Balanescu, then to John Tavener's increasingly frantic score.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Sylvia Hui, Associated Press
LONDON - British police arrested a 10th suspect Monday in connection with the vicious street killing of a soldier in London, an apparent Islamic extremist attack that has horrified the country and heightened racial tensions. The 50-year-old man was detained in Welling, east of London, on suspicion of conspiring to murder 25-year-old soldier Lee Rigby, Scotland Yard said. Police gave no further information about the suspect's identity. The latest arrest came as more details trickled out about the background of Michael Adebolajo, 28, one of the two main British suspects in Wednesday's slaying.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Jon Stephenson, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Six British soldiers were believed killed when an explosion struck their armored vehicle, marking the biggest loss of life for British forces in Afghanistan in years, officials in London said Wednesday. The explosion a day earlier in the southern province of Helmand figured to renew calls for an earlier withdrawal from Afghanistan for international forces, which have faced increasing violence as they try to hand security responsibilities to Afghan forces before the end of 2014.
NEWS
September 4, 2011
Five 4ths of July By Pat Raccio Hughes Viking Juvenile. 278 pp. $16.99 Reviewed by Katie Haegele   Philly-area writer Pat Raccio Hughes has breathed new life into an old conflict with her historical novel Five 4ths of July . Set in 1777-81, the story follows Jake Mallery, a nervy young teenager from a Patriot family who live on the coast of Connecticut, where they operate a ferry...
NEWS
June 24, 2011
IN THE '60s, we faced a great crisis - the Vietnam War. And this city had one of the highest rates of soldiers who were killed. So many young men were drafted here because they dropped out of school. The reason wasn't bad teachers, but poor programs that lacked funds. Young men of all colors gave their lives for their country. So I listen to Mayor Nutter, who wants to continue to upgrade our schools but can't do it if we keep crying about taxes versus the education of our children.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
By Michael Kranish On July 4, 1776, Thomas Jefferson was writing at a table alongside other members of Congress in Philadelphia. This scene does not describe his work on the Declaration of Independence. Rather, he was taking notes on the nation's first congressional investigation - of American troops' disastrous campaign into Canada, in which Benedict Arnold played a leading role. When the investigation was over a few weeks later, Jefferson remained one of Arnold's defenders, calling him a "fine sailor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010
Based on the Amos Oz novella "Panther in the Basement," The Little Traitor muddles through the story of a boy's coming of age in a nascent nation. The man-child is Proffy (short for "Professor"), a Jewish lad on the brink of adolescence in 1947 Palestine under the British Mandate. The nation is Israel, on the brink of creation. The panther in the basement reasonably might refer either to Proffy's budding sexuality or to stealthy Jewish resistance fighters rising up against British occupation.
NEWS
March 14, 2010 | By Cynthia Tucker
Liz Cheney doesn't hold a U.S. Senate seat. She doesn't have the power to call committee hearings to intimidate those who dare disagree with her. And she isn't practicing her demagoguery in an era of widespread fear of an existential threat. Nevertheless, she has slipped easily into the role of Joseph McCarthy. Maybe it's in her genes. The daughter of the former vice president, she has her father's meanness, his dark view of the world, and his autocratic sense of authority.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a half-hour plea for clemency, the patriarch of an ill-starred family yesterday described being wrenched from his home in Northern Ireland when he was 16, arrested, and tortured for days by British soldiers - background he never shared with U.S. officials. A federal judge responded by ordering an 18-month prison sentence for Sean O'Neill Sr., 49, of Willistown Township. Although the penalty fell below the sentencing-guideline range of 30 to 37 months, about 25 of O'Neill's friends and relatives wept in response.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
You see some weird stuff on the Internet, like the description of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later" as a "zombie romp. " The movie was anything but a romp. In fact, it was one of the first really good post-9/11 movies to imagine how terror attacks could break containment and morph into something apocalyptic (see also "Children of Men"). Boyle framed it as a genre picture, and avoided obvious commentary. He peeled away politics and boiled everything down to seething anger - his "zombies" were actually living people infected with a "rage virus," a disease (like hate itself)
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