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NEWS
May 21, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was nearly 11:30 on a Tuesday morning, and WYSP disc jockey Debbi Calton was well into her on-air shift, sitting in a studio chatting with listeners before playing the next set of rock music. Her smooth voice, amplified, commanded notice inside the fourth-floor studio at One Bala Plaza in Bala Cynwyd. It gained a wider audience, though, by traveling an electronic path from the studio to the rooftop, then out over trees and rooftops to a transmitter in Roxborough 2 1/2 miles away.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | by Eric Mink, New York Daily News
Let's put it bluntly: The weapon of choice in the dirty campaign against public broadcasting is the Big Lie. When Sen. Larry Pressler blathers, "Don't let anybody say that we're trying to kill public radio and public broadcasting . . . we just want to privatize it," that is a Big Lie. There is private broadcasting and there is public broadcasting. There is no such thing as private public broadcasting. Public broadcasting is noncommercial, with limited, noninterruptive, on-air acknowledgments of contributors.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have been a broadcasting talent for 12 years and an executive in management for six years, also in broadcasting. I possess solid skills in many areas of radio station operation. However, I wish to move on either to something on a higher plane in broadcasting or preferably to another industry. How do I market myself to make a career change? How do I find a new career? - P.U.P., Philadelphia First, try to parlay your accumulated broadcasting experience into something bigger in the same field.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard H. Heist, 82, of Collegeville, a longtime broadcaster who launched a second career restoring antique clocks, died Friday, Nov. 28, of lung disease at his home. He and his wife, Elaine Marshman Heist, had celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on March 20. Born in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Heist, known as "Dick," graduated from the Perkiomen School and Ursinus College. He studied criminal and civil law while serving as a magistrate for the Borough of Collegeville. He then switched to broadcasting.
SPORTS
January 31, 1986 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Jack "Goose" Givens never played in the Olympics, but he'd sure like the chance to broadcast at them, as early as 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. "It was always a dream of mine when I was playing, to win a gold medal," said Givens, who is best remembered for his 41-point performance in Kentucky's 1978 NCAA championship game victory against Gene Banks and the Duke Blue Devils. "But that's kind of tough when you graduate two years after one Olympics (1976) and two years before the next.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | By Barry Rabin
I have a small proposition to make: If the media insist on stripping people in public office (and their families) of every last scrap of personal privacy, it's only fair that the people who do the broadcasting should come clean as well. In fact, I think we should pass a law requiring it. If such a law were already on the books, a typical TV network news broadcast during the last week would have sounded something like this: Trumpets: TV news theme song. Announcer: And now, we interrupt this program to bring you this ZBC Special Report.
SPORTS
April 2, 2009 | By BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
His broadcasting philosophy is one that any Philadelphia fan of any sport can relate to: "Broadcasting to me is like the two of us sitting in a living room watching the game and talking about it, without the cursing. " It is part of the reason Whitey Rigsby has become as recognizable a face in Villanova basketball lore as Rollie Massimino, Jay Wright and anyone else who has ever been a part of it. Saturday, for the second time in his career, Rigsby will be calling a national semifinal game that features his beloved Wildcats, who face North Carolina (CBS3, approximately 8:40 p.m.)
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Television was still in its infancy in the 1950s, experimenting with images and sounds, when Lionel J. Monagas found himself a place behind the scenes as a traffic typist with a CBS affiliate in Washington. It was a time when African Americans were rarely seen in front of or behind the camera, but Mr. Monagas, 70, spent his life trying to change that. He died Sunday of cardiac arrest at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Monagas continued to work behind the scenes during his long career in broadcasting, but he used his increasingly influential positions to inform and empower other African Americans seeking jobs in the media.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every morning Ann Marie Wallace sends her husband off to work, dotes over her twin 2-year-old daughters, then chats over coffee with a few thousand of her closest friends. Weekday mornings from 9 a.m. to noon, Wallace broadcasts The Home Show from her basement on WCZN-AM (1590). Wallace loves working at home - she gets to spend more time with Kaitlin and Kierstin, it's an easy commute and she saves money on day care. As Mom spins Tony Bennett and Helen Reddy records, Kaitlin and Kierstin sometimes climb on her lap or sing along with a song.
SPORTS
October 11, 1993 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clemson Smith Muniz, Penn graduate and descendant of Philadelphia blue bloods, is the Tim McCarver of the Latin world, the color man broadcasting Phillies-Braves playoff games to 50 million people in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Smith Muniz's Philadelphia roots go deep - and we'll get to Katharine Hepburn in a minute. Smith Muniz and his play-by-play partner, Alvaro Martin, usually work for ESPN in the network's Connecticut studios, doing voice-overs in Spanish of everything from college football to monster trucks.
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NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Michael J. Ferguson, 64, of Ardmore, a broadcast producer, adjunct professor, and mentor to many, died Aug. 3, of stomach cancer at his family's home in Narberth. He was the second oldest of eight children born in Chicago to Thomas and Frances Ferguson. "Michael was the perfect big brother to everyone in our family," his brother Steve said. Mr. Ferguson graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1969 and Villanova University in 1973, majoring in education and the classics.
SPORTS
May 12, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, STAFF WRITER
ALAA ABDELNABY remembers the embarrassment he felt as a young boy growing up in North Jersey. He'd go to a friend's house with orders from his mom, Selia, to call her when he got there. Being a dutiful son, Abdelnaby would make the call. When he assured her he was fine, he was always met with silence at the other end. He could feel his mom's impatience growing through the phone line. Selia didn't want to hear her son's words in English, but rather in Arabic. Abdelnaby, who just completed his first season as the color analyst for Sixers' telecasts on Comcast SportsNet with play-by-play man Marc Zumoff, was born in Alexandria, Egypt, before his family moved to New Jersey when Abdelnaby was 2. It was important to his mother that her son, a McDonald's all-American at Bloomfield High School before playing for Mike Krzyzewski at Duke, be fluent in Arabic while growing up American.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, STAFF WRITER
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. acquired the 24-hour Tennis Channel - which has had a long-running legal feud with Comcast Corp. - for $350 million. Sinclair also will realize tax benefits related to the Tennis Channel's $200 million in net operating losses. Sinclair executive vice president Barry Faber said Wednesday that the Tennis Channel will boost its distribution through pay-TV operators to 50 million homes, from 30 million homes, over the next year. Sinclair owns, operates or provides services to 171 local TV stations and has said it would diversify into cable channels.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
On the day the case was scheduled for trial in a federal courtroom in New York, Major League Baseball settled a class-action antitrust lawsuit claiming that baseball's longtime practice of carving the nation into media markets for TV broadcasts was anti-competitive and hurt fans. Tuesday's settlement left intact Major League Baseball's exclusive geographical territories for TV broadcasts and online streaming - Philadelphia remains a Phillies TV market - but the league agreed to concessions estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars to consumers over time in lower prices for baseball packages.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry L. Clark Jr., 77, of Hatboro, a broadcast pioneer, educator, and Hatboro councilman, died Tuesday, Sept. 29, of aplastic anemia in Abington Hospice, Warminster. The son of Harry L. Clark Sr. and Lillian Dameron, he graduated from Hatboro-Horsham High School in 1955 and earned a bachelor's degree in music from Susquehanna University. Bucky, as he was called, completed master's and doctoral degrees in educational administration, both from Temple University. From 1971 until 2014, he was principal of the Log College Middle School in Warminster.
SPORTS
August 27, 2015 | Staff Report
THE FLYERS announced their local broadcast schedule for the 2015-16 season. The Flyers will have 71 of their games televised locally in the Philadelphia market. Of those games, 60 will air on Comcast SportsNet, with 11 airing on The Comcast Network. The remaining 11 game will be exclusive national telecasts. Nine will be broadcast on NBC Sports Network and two will be on NBC. The Comcast Network will also televised three preseason games - vs. the Rangers on Sept. 22, the Islanders on Sept.
SPORTS
August 14, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
MALIK ROSE, a former standout at Drexel who has been the TV analyst for Sixers games since 2011, is leaving the organization to join the front office of the Atlanta Hawks, according to a report. Chris Vivlamore, the Hawks' beat writer for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, tweeted last night, "The Hawks have hired Malik Rose to a front-office position. " On the website, he wrote that Rose was expected to work in the basketball operations department and that a person familiar with the hire said the Hawks are "very excited.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | Daily News
PHILLIES FANS have on occasion stopped in their tracks and pointed to Chris Wheeler. They hesitate, then say: "Hey . . . hey, you're Harry Kalas!" To which Wheeler replies, "Now, that would be a big story. " Wheeler, a/k/a "Wheels," is recounting this yesterday, somewhere around the eighth hole at Blue Bell Country Club in Montgomery County, where he's playing a round of golf. He did color commentary and called play-by-play action for 37 years until 2013, when Comcast, in a $2.5 billion TV deal with the Phillies, dropped both Wheels and Gary "Sarge" Matthews.
SPORTS
February 21, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Former major-league catcher Ben Davis, a Malvern Prep graduate and West Chester resident, will join the Phillies' broadcast team this season as the third member in the booth, Comcast SportsNet announced Thursday. Davis and second-year broadcaster Matt Stairs will provide color commentary alongside play-by-play man Tom McCarthy. Davis replaces Jamie Moyer, who opted not to return for a second season in order to spend more time with his family on the West Coast. The other finalist for the job, former Phillies shortstop Kevin Stocker, turned down the position, several sources told The Inquirer.
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