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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the beginning, the creators of the musical Mike weren't really interested in chronicling the life of Mike Todd, the flamboyant Broadway and Hollywood producer. "We didn't want to do a conventional biography where offstage there's a squalling baby and on stage a doctor says, 'You have a son, Mr. Goldbogen,' " says Thomas Meehan, who wrote the book for the new musical. The show opens Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theater after a week and a half of previews. So Mike does not detail the transformation of Avrom Hirsch Goldbogen, son of an impoverished immigrant rabbi in Minnesota, into Mike Todd, flashy Broadway showman, producer of the film spectacular Around the World in 80 Days and, for a brief time before his death in a plane crash in 1958, the second husband of actress Elizabeth Taylor.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Oscar-winning actor Sir Rex Harrison, who taught the king's English in My Fair Lady and talked to animals as the lovable Dr. Dolittle during a 66-year career, died in his sleep yesterday. He was 82. He died of pancreatic cancer at his Manhattan home, said his attorney, Harold Schiff. Schiff said Mr. Harrison had dropped out of the hit Broadway show The Circle three weeks ago, a week before its scheduled close, because he thought he had a gall bladder inflammation. "He just thought he was not well.
NEWS
February 15, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Is there such a thing as the eternal musical? Is Broadway moving into a millennium of the permanent playbill, when theaters will be filled with shows that run on and on and on into infinity? Consider the following: A Chorus Line opened at Broadway's Shubert Theater on July 25, 1975. Today, going on 13, it is still there, the longest-running musical in the history of the American theater. The weekly box-office receipts suggest that the end is near, but that has happened before, and the show renewed its lease on life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hearts aren't the only body parts that break during productions of Les Miserables or Phantom of the Opera. The Broadway musicals, along with several other long-running hits, can be physically dangerous to perform, and regularly cause aches and pains that are entirely unromantic. According to a new medical study on actors' injuries, some of the agonized expressions you see on stage may be genuine. More than half the actors in the 10 New York productions and 13 companies on tour in the month surveyed - February 1993 - reported that they had been injured.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Margery Klain has produced theater in New York, but when it came to realizing a long-held desire to present staged concert revivals of Broadway musicals, she looked no farther than Center City, where she has made her home for the last 25 years. "It just seems like Philadelphia is the place to do it," Klain said of Broadway Opus, the nonprofit theater company she is launching with a production in June of The Roar of the Greasepaint - The Smell of the Crowd at the Merriam Theater.
NEWS
January 31, 2003 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cold weather has put Broadway ticket sales on ice, forcing three shows to close because of poor turnout. Imaginary Friends, Nora Ephron's play with music about the feud between writers Lillian Hellman and Mary McCarthy, will close Feb. 16 after 76 performances, producers said Wednesday. Oklahoma!, the $10 million Cameron Mackintosh revival that recently added Patty Duke to the cast, said it will shut down in the spring after a yearlong run, but gave no definite closing date.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - A producer on Friday won a British court victory over Monty Python for a bigger share of royalties from the stage musical Spamalot and said that despite the dispute he still found the comedy troupe funny. Mark Forstater brought a High Court lawsuit against the anarchic comedians over the show, which is based on the 1975 movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail . Forstater produced the film, and his lawyers claimed it was agreed that he would be "treated as the seventh Python" financially, entitled to the same share of Holy Grail merchandising and spin-off income as the other members.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011
THE PEE-WEE HERMAN SHOW ON BROADWAY. 10 p.m. Saturday, HBO. NOT MANY Broadway shows begin with the Pledge of Allegiance, but then so few star Pee-wee Herman. Paul Reubens, the artist known as Pee-wee, returns Saturday night to HBO, the place where his bow-tied character's TV career launched in another special three decades ago, with "The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway. " Filmed this winter during the show's limited run at Manhattan's Stephen Sondheim Theater, it's a happy mix of childlike wonder and mildly adult humor - too mild for "Two and a Half Men," but maybe too adult for Saturday mornings - that allows Reubens to be timeless and yet topical.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The opening concert of the current Philly Pops program at the Academy of Music was flawless - outstanding, from the moment Peter Nero struck up the orchestra with Gershwin's "Strike Up the Band" to the "Liberty Bell March," with which Nero has traditionally closed Pops performances since 1979. The program, titled "Broadway Gold," is devoted mainly to show tunes of the 1940s and 1950s. ("Strike Up the Band," which goes back to 1927, is one exception; Cole Porter's "Night and Day," a 1930s classic, is another.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Put Romeo and Juliet in New York's Hell's Kitchen. Make his family native-born American and hers immigrant Puerto Rican. Set it to music by Leonard Bernstein, with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and choreography by Jerome Robbins, maestros at the top of their game. The volatile result is West Side Story (1961), Robert Wise's and Robbins' explosive translation of the Broadway musical to the screen. Its creators put ear to manhole in order to listen to urban rhythms - and then cranked the volume up to 10. More attention was lavished on the music and dancing than on the acting by the nominal leads, Richard Beymer as Tony and Natalie Wood as Maria, and it shows.
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