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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Theater Critic
The lights already are up on a number of notable shows during the theater season's second half - Body Awareness at the Wilma, the Philadelphia Theatre Company's Scottsboro Boys across the street, The Mousetrap at the Walnut, Clybourne Park at the Arden and InterAct's Microcrisis are among them - and they herald a busy season's finish for the region's 51 professional theater companies. Productions include a heady mix of main-stage world premieres by established locally based playwrights, established shows that bear restaging, and plenty of curiosities thrown in. As usual, we can't vouch for most of these because they're not yet running, but they whet our appetite for a promising season finale.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Once heralded as the greatest British actor of his generation, Nicol Williamson was also a legend for stormy onstage behavior that included calling off a performance of Hamlet mid-speech because he was too tired to go on. "I'll pay for the seats," he later recalled telling the audience in 1969, "but I won't shortchange you by not giving my best. " And then he walked off. He made his name as the faltering attorney in John Osborne's Inadmissible Evidence in the mid-1960s in London, rode the role to a Tony Award nomination on Broadway, and re-created the part in the 1968 film.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The three new one-acts combined into a Broadway show called Relatively Speaking come across as a comedic evolution in time-lapse. It all goes by in barely more than two hours, beginning with the subtle, ending with the zany. We start with writer/filmmaker Ethan Coen's "Talking Cure," a facile piece that ups the sharp comic ante as it progresses. After a four-minute break, we're into classic Elaine May, a piece called "George Is Dead," with more nuance and bigger laughs as it turns from a character study into a poignant scenario that works.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
Price Berkley, 92, founder, editor, and longtime publisher of Theatrical Index, the weekly trade publication that has been consulted by anyone wanting to produce, finance, write about, or possibly avoid a Broadway show, died Sunday at his Manhattan home. Mr. Berkley founded Theatrical Index in 1964 with a typewriter, a stapler, and 16 subscribers. It retains its original, humble form: a slim sheaf secured at the top with staples. "People used to put it on a clipboard on their bulletin board, and they still do," said Steve Bebout, who succeeded Mr. Berkley as editor in chief after his retirement in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2011 | By Frazier Moore, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A few Betty White turn-ons: She likes a cocktail before dinner and a weekly poker night. She has a taste for french fries and hot dogs, and a jones for crossword puzzles. And, in service to her passion as a writer, reams of lined notebook paper really get her going. Indeed, White has written a new book, If You Ask Me (And of Course You Won't) (Putnam, $25.95). It's a chipper, hop-scotching meditation on her life, loves, and career - with lots of photos - that reads like a chat with the beloved star.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By FRAZIER MOORE, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A few Betty White turn-ons: She likes a cocktail before dinner and a weekly poker night. She has a taste for french fries and hot dogs, and a jones for crossword puzzles. And, in service to her passion as a writer, reams of lined notebook paper really get her going. Indeed, White has written a new book, "If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't). " It's a chipper, hopscotching meditation on her life, loves and career - with lots of photos - that reads like a chat with the beloved star.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011
THE PEE-WEE HERMAN SHOW ON BROADWAY. 10 p.m. Saturday, HBO. NOT MANY Broadway shows begin with the Pledge of Allegiance, but then so few star Pee-wee Herman. Paul Reubens, the artist known as Pee-wee, returns Saturday night to HBO, the place where his bow-tied character's TV career launched in another special three decades ago, with "The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway. " Filmed this winter during the show's limited run at Manhattan's Stephen Sondheim Theater, it's a happy mix of childlike wonder and mildly adult humor - too mild for "Two and a Half Men," but maybe too adult for Saturday mornings - that allows Reubens to be timeless and yet topical.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2009 | By Laura Hedli FOR THE INQUIRER
Colman Domingo was around 35 when his second growth spurt began. He'd already weathered the awkward years of buck teeth and ballet lessons. Now the actor had to figure out a way to say goodbye to his parents and his childhood home at 52d and Chancellor Streets in West Philly. But rather than letting go, Domingo decided to archive his memories. The result is A Boy and His Soul, a one-man show - equal parts song, dance and storytelling - that captures the energy of the neighborhood, and the pervasiveness of R&B and soul in the 1970s and '80s.
SPORTS
November 27, 2007 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Tomorrow morning, traffic will come to a standstill in one of the busiest sections of New York, but this time it won't be gawking tourists or angry cabbies blocking the streets. NASCAR is back to take Manhattan in a big way, with this season's top 10 drivers parading their race cars over a 1 1/2-mile course, starting at 8:30 a.m. in front of the Good Morning America studios at 44th Street and Broadway. Rolling along in single file, the 3,400-pound stock cars, powered by 850-horsepower engines, figure to rattle windows and scatter pigeons en route to the finish line, in the shadow of the Hard Rock Cafe at 43d Street and Seventh Avenue.
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