CollectionsBroadway
IN THE NEWS

Broadway

NEWS
September 14, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The most exciting dance events looming on the horizon outside of Philadelphia will break on New York's Great White Way rather than in one of its many theaters devoted to dance. The producers who brought tango and flamenco to national attention a few years back will likely do the same for American black dance when Black and Blue opens at the Minskoff Theater Dec. 4. Conceived by Claudio Segovia and Hector Orezzoli, Black and Blue features an all-star lineup of dancers, singers and musicians from the world of jazz and popular dance.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
After experiencing the song, rap and dance extravaganza that is the Hammer "Too Legit" show, it's tempting to suggest the "legit" that Hammer can't quit wishing for is the legitimate Broadway stage. Witnessed last night at the Spectrum, the Hammer spectacle has pretentions closer to "A Chorus Line" than to your average Public Enemy or L.L. Cool J concert. It's an ensemble effort, and one that swallows up the Hammer man on more than a few occasions. Still, I suspect Hammer likes it that way. As a self-styled patron of the arts, he can assume the role of producer/band leader (a la Quincy Jones)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Theater Critic
The second half of the region's bustling theater season comes alive with plays fresh from Broadway and Off-Broadway - mixed in, as always, with world premieres, American premieres, and, this year, a series of Irish plays on different professional stages. In April, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts brings some new stage work with a French twist.   - Howard Shapiro   Inquirer theater critic   Spring Arts - Theater: Spring theater Lidless A new play by Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig concerns a retired Guantanamo Bay interrogator - a woman who is confronted by a former detainee with an extreme demand for a part of her liver.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
It's an off week in the video world, offering only three moderately interesting titles: a lukewarm adaptation of a Broadway play, a disappointing retelling of A Christmas Carol and a predictable teen comedy. MISS FIRECRACKER (1989) (HBO) $89.99. 102 minutes. 1/2 Holly Hunter, Mary Steenburgen, Tim Robbins, Alfre Woodard, Scott Glenn. Hunter reprises her Off-Broadway turn as a backwater beauty-queen aspirant in the screen adaptation of Beth Henley's The Miss Firecracker Contest.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service, riding a crest of spectacular sales with its Legends of American Music Series of commemoratives, will issue Wednesday a booklet of 29-cent stamps recalling four famous Broadway musicals. The commemoratives, 20 to a booklet, will depict scenes from My Fair Lady, Porgy and Bess, Show Boat and Oklahoma! The stamp for Oklahoma! was issued earlier this year as a separate sheet of 40 stamps. The issuance will coincide with the 100th anniversary of Broadway.
NEWS
June 12, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Tony Awards, Broadway's highest accolades, will be televised Sunday - the night each year when Broadway is most clearly on the nation's radar. But in cities big and small, Broadway means more than a Manhattan street or the 40 stages that represent the pinnacle of American commercial theater. Broadway, because of a vibrant schedule of popular national tours, is no longer confined to Broadway. Consider: The national tour of Billy Elliot , a Tony winner still running on Broadway, is playing in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
The latest definition of a "veteran" theatergoer is someone who can remember when the advertisements for Broadway shows always included the price of tickets. Today, the folks who write the ads apparently assume that if you have to ask the ticket price beforehand, you probably can't afford it. The top price for a hit musical like Cats is now $45, up from $30 five years ago. The average ticket price - total ticket revenue divided by total attendance - is about $29, almost three times what it was 10 years ago. Some in the industry have cast these high prices as the villain in the harsh economic drama now playing on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | By David Browne, New York Daily News
The people on the line that started at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on W. 46th Street and swung around onto Broadway weren't your typical opening-night crowd. Leather and denim replaced mink and Armani, and some theatergoers quickly abandoned their plush seats in the low-ceilinged hall for a spot in front of the stage. Ushers tried to persuade them to return to their seats but, exasperated, quickly gave up. Outside, the brightly lit marquee said it all: "Joan Jett and the Blackhearts: On Broadway March 1-5. " Rock 'n' roll and Broadway are hardly strangers, although they may seem like an odd combination.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The 1988 edition of the satirical revue Forbidden Broadway has its sharp moments, but there aren't enough to account for the fact that the show is the first runaway success of the Off-Broadway season. The show that makes fun of Broadway has played to capacity audiences since its opening on Sept. 15, crammed onto the stage of Theater East, a 125-seat East Side cabaret. The advance sale recently reached $200,000. The low-ceilinged basement room has the ambiance of a Tokyo subway car at rush hour, except that everybody is sitting down.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Although the authority and brilliance of Jerome Robbins' Broadway gives no hint of it, Robbins has occupied an unusually tender position in the American theater: an acclaimed genius with second billing. As a house choreographer for the New York City Ballet from 1949 to the present (with a hiatus in the 1960s), Robbins has worked in the shadow of Balanchine, a shadow that shows no evidence of disappearing even though Balanchine is dead. Yet all the time he has been second banana on the concert stage, he has been recognized as the grand wizard of Broadway.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|