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NEWS
March 24, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Like it or not, President Bush has made broccoli a household vegetable. Bush admitted Thursday that he ate broccoli as a child only because his mother forced him. Now that he is president, he said, "I'm not going to eat any more broccoli. " Suggestions for the broccoli-hating president came yesterday from TV chef Julia Child and New Jersey Agriculture Secretary Arthur Brown. Child suggests garlic. Brown, whose Garden State has 140 farms where broccoli is grown, says the president should "listen to your mother.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
I try to buy produce locally and cook it seasonally. But there comes a time in late winter-early spring when I can't bear to roast another Brussels sprout, bake another sweet potato, or massage another leaf of kale into submission. That's when I buy broccoli grown who knows where and transported to my friendly neighborhood Whole Foods Market. Call it a bridge to the days of peas and asparagus. Once I get it home, I usually douse it with curry powder and roast it, or microwave it and finish it under the broiler.
LIVING
October 15, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story also contains material from the Associated Press, the New York Post, the Los Angeles Times and the Washington Post
If Hillary Rodham Clinton has her way, peas - not broccoli - will be the anti-veggie of the Clinton administration. During taping yesterday of a segment for TV's Sesame Street - to air Nov. 22 - the script called for her to urge Big Bird and Rosita to "eat your broccoli, string beans and green peas. " But between takes, Clinton suggested that the director substitute apples for green peas. "You could go . . . 'broccoli, string beans and apples' because hardly anybody likes peas," she said.
FOOD
March 28, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
"Because I said so. " Apparently that explanation no longer works when George Bush asks, "Why do I have to eat broccoli?" George thinks now that he's President of the United States, he doesn't have to eat broccoli if he doesn't want to. Certainly, Barbara can't make him. After all, since the kids are all grown and gone, he doesn't have to set a good example at the dinner table. Nor can George be shamed into eating broccoli. Outraged broccoli growers have shipped 10 tons of the green stuff to Washington, but still he says, "Pass the pork rinds" instead.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The first family's "food fight" escalated yesterday, when Barbara Bush accepted a bunch of broccoli and launched into an attack on the President's favorite snack: pork rinds. Mrs. Bush conceded that she could not reverse her husband's vow never to eat broccoli again, but she said she could play that game, too. "I am never going to eat pork rinds. Ever," she told a group of reporters on the White House lawn, where she accepted a gift of 10,000 pounds of broccoli the produce industry is donating to soup kitchens.
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 4 servings For the broccoli soup: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small yellow onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, minced Pinch of red chili flakes 11/2 pounds broccoli, stems trimmed, peeled, and chopped, and crowns cut into bite-size pieces (reserve 2 cups florets) 1 cup drained chickpeas 3 cups water 1/2 recipe Sun-dried Tomato Pesto, see below (about 1/4 cup) Salt and pepper, to taste Parmigiano-reggiano or other sharp cheese, for serving, optional For the sun-dried tomato pesto: 1/4 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano-reggiano or Parmesan cheese Zest and juice of 1/4 lemon 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 tablespoon water Salt and pepper, to taste 1. To prepare the soup: heat olive oil in pot over medium heat.
NEWS
March 27, 1990
The bad news that Dr. Louis W. Sullivan had to deliver last week wasn't quite as catchy as the flap over broccoli, the President's Vegetable Enemy Number One. But even the TV news shows felt compelled to ask about the latest Public Health Service figures showing glaring disparities in health statistics between whites and blacks, and between the United States and other countries. They are gaps that are, by now, both distressing and numbingly familiar. The newly outspoken head of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services told an interviewer that Japan used to have much higher rates of infant deaths than America before World War II. But it crusaded against the problem.
LIVING
June 8, 1986 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Once in a while, the gardening partner gets passionate about a vegetable and, before I know what's happening, he's advocating that we grow almost nothing but this one crop. Then you hear him singing its praises in the bank, the post office, on the phone to his friends and even to his mother-in- law. This happened last fall with broccoli. We had grown broccoli before many times, but apparently he had not noticed. In October and November 1985, he could hardly leave it alone. Each morning he would dash into the garden to see what the possibilities were of another head of broccoli for supper, and he continually chastised me for not growing enough.
FOOD
March 28, 1990 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
The Leader of the Free World abhors broccoli. He has hated it since the first inklings of flavor activated his peewee palate. And now that he's president, he intends to do something about it: He won't eat it ever again. By his own report, this is not the first time that George Bush has railed against broccoli. One imagines a gentlemanly little George trapped at table, refusing to swallow one more bite of his bushy nemesis, and one wonders just what he meant when he said his mother forced him to do so. She probably insisted, cajoled and threatened.
FOOD
November 3, 1993 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
By now, many of us have heard that broccoli is one of the most healthful vegetables - it is rich in nutrients and low in calories. The problem is that there isn't always time to cook fresh broccoli for supper. One time-saving solution is to cook enough broccoli for two meals. However, even perfectly cooked, bright green, tender-crisp broccoli florets can taste and look "tired" the second time around. What I like to do when cooking dinner a day or two later is to turn cooked broccoli into a sauce for pasta.
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FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 4 servings For the broccoli soup: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small yellow onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, minced Pinch of red chili flakes 11/2 pounds broccoli, stems trimmed, peeled, and chopped, and crowns cut into bite-size pieces (reserve 2 cups florets) 1 cup drained chickpeas 3 cups water 1/2 recipe Sun-dried Tomato Pesto, see below (about 1/4 cup) Salt and pepper, to taste Parmigiano-reggiano or other sharp cheese, for serving, optional For the sun-dried tomato pesto: 1/4 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano-reggiano or Parmesan cheese Zest and juice of 1/4 lemon 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 tablespoon water Salt and pepper, to taste 1. To prepare the soup: heat olive oil in pot over medium heat.
FOOD
December 18, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
The students from Wiggins Prep Elementary in Camden were wound up for their last day of cooking class: They'd be preparing dinner for parents, siblings, and guests, showing off the skills they'd learned over the last seven weeks. And their excitement was bubbling over. The teachers were having issues of their own. "I just want to let you know what we are working with today," said Edith Bobb, one of the three teachers who have helped with the class. Dawn Wilson had put on two different-colored socks that morning, and Susan Lore came to school wearing two different shoes.
FOOD
December 11, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Not so long ago, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna noodle, chicken and rice, ground beef and macaroni, these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MAUREEN FITZGERALD, Inquirer Food Editor mfitzgerald@phillynews.com, 215-854-5744
NOT SO LONG AGO, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna-noodle; chicken and rice; ground beef and macaroni; these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia. "I guess people don't make them anymore.
FOOD
April 24, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
"Shrimp!" called out Angelica Marrero, 10, raising her fists in celebration as she entered the kitchen. She and her classmates at Sacred Heart School in Camden had been looking forward to this cooking lesson: shrimp with lemon garlic linguine. "I'm so excited for shrimp," she said. The students had flipped ahead in their cookbooks to see what recipes they would be making during the eight-week healthy-cooking class, and this was the one they were all waiting for. Last week, when Bryson Barnes, 10, said his mom made the dish with broccoli instead of peas, the other students wished for broccoli, too. So the volunteers, Ruth Biemer and Sylvia Wilson, two retired elementary-school teachers with decades of experience, taught the children a lesson before the class even started: A recipe need not be followed to the letter.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
ALLENTOWN - Matt Caton maneuvered around the wood skewer impaling a thick slice of maple-coated bacon. He took a bite. "Awesome," he said, chewing happily Sunday on the newest offering at the Lehigh Valley IronPigs' stadium. Caton knows that a health-focused organization tried to get the team, the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, to ban bacon last year. He didn't know that the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is back again this season. "Stop complaining and enjoy it with a baseball game," Caton said as the IronPigs battled the Pawtucket Red Sox. That's easy to do in a bacon-infused ballpark that features a mascot named Chris P. Bacon, and sells chocolate-covered bacon and bacon-scented T-shirts.
FOOD
December 20, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I knew I had a battle ahead of me for our next-to-last cooking class with fifth graders at Bayard Taylor Elementary School in North Philadelphia - and it wasn't with the kids. Throughout our lessons over the last nine weeks, we had been fighting with our electric oven and all its digital bells and whistles. The thing seemed to have a mind of its own; its ability to hold a consistent temperature was as unpredictable as a moody teenager. But I was determined to teach the kids this simple recipe for baked chicken thighs and potatoes because, with a working oven, it's such an easy family dinner - just prep and pop in the oven - and it appeals to even finicky eaters.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
I try to buy produce locally and cook it seasonally. But there comes a time in late winter-early spring when I can't bear to roast another Brussels sprout, bake another sweet potato, or massage another leaf of kale into submission. That's when I buy broccoli grown who knows where and transported to my friendly neighborhood Whole Foods Market. Call it a bridge to the days of peas and asparagus. Once I get it home, I usually douse it with curry powder and roast it, or microwave it and finish it under the broiler.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Now that the Supreme Court has upheld health-care reform, President Obama can get to the next logical order of business: compulsory broccoli purchases.   Absurd? Tell that to the Supreme Court, which cited the vegetable no fewer than a dozen times in its ruling last week on the Affordable Care Act. Not so long ago, when no legal scholar believed the health-care law faced a serious constitutional challenge, the broccoli question sprouted as conservative reductio ad absurdum: If the federal government could force us to buy health insurance, why couldn't it make us buy broccoli?
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