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Brokered Convention

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NEWS
May 22, 1987 | By Jeff Greenfield
Once upon a time, the carnival came through town every year, turning Farmer Brown's cornfield into a riotous midway of dancing girls, sideshow freaks, food and drink and sights to dazzle the senses, spectacles wondrous enough to taunt the dreams of youth for years. Then the carnival stopped coming, an apparant victim of changing times. All that was left were the fading memories of old-timers, who would regale the young folks with tales of the days and nights that would come no more.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | By Jeff Greenfield
Once upon a time, an increasingly popular fairy tale goes, America chose its leaders far more wisely than it does now. Every four years, practical, pragmatic men closeted themselves behind closed doors, lighted cigars so that the room might be filled with smoke, and selected an able candidate for president. There were giants of the earth in those days, the fairy tale continues - Roosevelts and Trumans. Then, a little band of zealous Jacobins wrenched the process away from those good men and delivered it into the hands of the mob, whereupon dark days befell the Republic, and pygmies walked where giants had once stood.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | Compiled from reports by staff writer Reginald Stuart and Daily News wire services
With the Democratic race in a near deadlock going into the final series of presidential-preference contests, the candidates are debating the prospects of a brokered convention. Party chairman Paul Kirk, dreading the spectre of a political battle being played out on national television, already is making plans to head off any such development. He has called for the survivors of the state contests to huddle for a summit immediately after the California and New Jersey primaries on June 7. Summit topics: deciding on a nominee, a vice president and a platform.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
ASSUMING, as I do, that Rick Santorum won't be the Republican nominee, here's a question: Could Rick do for the GOP in 2012 what Ralph Nader did for Democrats back in 2000? Hold on, I'm not saying the two are alike or that the elections are similar. I'm asking if Santorum is a spoiler - in the manner of Nader. You'll may recall that Nader got nearly 97,500 votes in Florida, the state that decided the '00 race. Al Gore lost Florida by about 540 votes. Could be said that Nader helped Republicans.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Philip J. Trounstine of the Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article
Vincent Van Rhyn, an office worker here, is turned off by Bill Clinton and confused by Jerry Brown. "It's a gut feeling, but I just don't trust Clinton," he said. As for Brown, Van Rhyn, 32, is baffled since the media began raising questions about Brown's proposed flat tax. He said the questions have "thrown a monkey wrench" into his plan to vote for Brown. With the pivotal New York primary just five days away, voters are increasingly uncomfortable with both candidates.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Democratic presidential picture still cloudy, political insiders are beginning to look to the 646 so-called super delegates who will attend the party's nominating convention in July. These are the people who, by virtue of holding office or being active in the party, have been designated as delegates by the party. As such, they are more equal than the run-of-the-mill delegates elected by the voters. The super delegates, who make up the largest and most politically experienced bloc at the convention, hold a powerful hand.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | BY DANIEL SCHORR, From the New York Times
Because the road to New Orleans was more clearly charted than the road to Atlanta, the Republicans have escaped most of the orgy of media speculation and confusion that bedeviled the Democrats' nomination process. Yet, however small the vacuum of knowledge, the press abhors it. Too often, the press forgets that projections from volatile voter trends can turn out wrong and that a candidate can always create surprise by choosing a running mate not on the advertised list. Many in the media, driven by competitive pressures, tend to seek escape from uncertainty and ambiguity into a speculative world of conflict and confusion, upsets and surprises.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Washington Bureau
For the Democrats, Super Tuesday was a very strange event. The results of the 20 primaries and caucuses, which produced three distinct winners, made it all but impossible for any Democratic candidate to win the nomination outright in the primaries. The sheer arithmetic says it cannot be done. But at the same time, this huge political happening silenced any talk of late-entering candidates and other exotic solutions to the Democrats' search for the perfect nominee. "I hope these results will do away with this foolishness about a brokered convention," said former party chairman Robert S. Strauss.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Larry Eichel and Carl M. Cannon, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Democratic Party is a step away from gridlock. That step - a win by Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt in Michigan on March 26 - would return the race for the Democratic presidential nomination to square one. A revived Gephardt candidacy would leave the party with too many candidates - five - and not enough delegates at stake in the remaining contests to give the process any real chance of sorting itself out. With that, the possibility...
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye and Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Only days after Bill Clinton seemed to have the Democratic presidential nomination in hand, he suddenly faces two weeks in which he has to overcome persistent doubts about his character and electability. The Arkansas governor's defeat in Connecticut underscored that doubtful Democratic voters are not ready to accept the verdict of politicians and the media, who declared that Clinton had a lock on the nomination after Paul E. Tsongas dropped out last week. "This was a keep-it-open vote," said Ann Lewis, former political director of the Democratic National Committee.
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NEWS
March 5, 2012
ASSUMING, as I do, that Rick Santorum won't be the Republican nominee, here's a question: Could Rick do for the GOP in 2012 what Ralph Nader did for Democrats back in 2000? Hold on, I'm not saying the two are alike or that the elections are similar. I'm asking if Santorum is a spoiler - in the manner of Nader. You'll may recall that Nader got nearly 97,500 votes in Florida, the state that decided the '00 race. Al Gore lost Florida by about 540 votes. Could be said that Nader helped Republicans.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
One pitfall of political writing is that you eventually feel a bit like Bill Murray in Groundhog Day , waking over and over to the same morning and same old song. But while Murray's alarm clock played "I Got You Babe" by Sonny and Cher, I'm currently hearing three oldies in heavy rotation: Will the President Dump His Veep? Will a Third-Party Candidate Make Waves in 2012? Will We See a Brokered Convention? I've heard these tunes before, many times. But they all spin bogus scenarios, cooked up - quite frankly - by journalistic brethren who fantasize about fresh story lines.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Philip J. Trounstine of the Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article
Vincent Van Rhyn, an office worker here, is turned off by Bill Clinton and confused by Jerry Brown. "It's a gut feeling, but I just don't trust Clinton," he said. As for Brown, Van Rhyn, 32, is baffled since the media began raising questions about Brown's proposed flat tax. He said the questions have "thrown a monkey wrench" into his plan to vote for Brown. With the pivotal New York primary just five days away, voters are increasingly uncomfortable with both candidates.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye and Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Only days after Bill Clinton seemed to have the Democratic presidential nomination in hand, he suddenly faces two weeks in which he has to overcome persistent doubts about his character and electability. The Arkansas governor's defeat in Connecticut underscored that doubtful Democratic voters are not ready to accept the verdict of politicians and the media, who declared that Clinton had a lock on the nomination after Paul E. Tsongas dropped out last week. "This was a keep-it-open vote," said Ann Lewis, former political director of the Democratic National Committee.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | BY DANIEL SCHORR, From the New York Times
Because the road to New Orleans was more clearly charted than the road to Atlanta, the Republicans have escaped most of the orgy of media speculation and confusion that bedeviled the Democrats' nomination process. Yet, however small the vacuum of knowledge, the press abhors it. Too often, the press forgets that projections from volatile voter trends can turn out wrong and that a candidate can always create surprise by choosing a running mate not on the advertised list. Many in the media, driven by competitive pressures, tend to seek escape from uncertainty and ambiguity into a speculative world of conflict and confusion, upsets and surprises.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Democratic presidential picture still cloudy, political insiders are beginning to look to the 646 so-called super delegates who will attend the party's nominating convention in July. These are the people who, by virtue of holding office or being active in the party, have been designated as delegates by the party. As such, they are more equal than the run-of-the-mill delegates elected by the voters. The super delegates, who make up the largest and most politically experienced bloc at the convention, hold a powerful hand.
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | By Bill Arthur, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Rep. Richard A. Gephardt quit the 1988 Democratic presidential race yesterday, with no excuses and no complaints. "It's said that the opera isn't over until the fat lady sings," he said before 150 cheering staffers and congressional supporters here. "Well, last Saturday in Michigan I think I heard her walking to the microphone. It's time to end a presidential campaign. " Gephardt, the fourth-ranking Democrat in the House, said he would run for re-election to a seventh term from his South St. Louis district.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | Compiled from reports by staff writer Reginald Stuart and Daily News wire services
With the Democratic race in a near deadlock going into the final series of presidential-preference contests, the candidates are debating the prospects of a brokered convention. Party chairman Paul Kirk, dreading the spectre of a political battle being played out on national television, already is making plans to head off any such development. He has called for the survivors of the state contests to huddle for a summit immediately after the California and New Jersey primaries on June 7. Summit topics: deciding on a nominee, a vice president and a platform.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Larry Eichel and Carl M. Cannon, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Democratic Party is a step away from gridlock. That step - a win by Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt in Michigan on March 26 - would return the race for the Democratic presidential nomination to square one. A revived Gephardt candidacy would leave the party with too many candidates - five - and not enough delegates at stake in the remaining contests to give the process any real chance of sorting itself out. With that, the possibility...
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Washington Bureau
For the Democrats, Super Tuesday was a very strange event. The results of the 20 primaries and caucuses, which produced three distinct winners, made it all but impossible for any Democratic candidate to win the nomination outright in the primaries. The sheer arithmetic says it cannot be done. But at the same time, this huge political happening silenced any talk of late-entering candidates and other exotic solutions to the Democrats' search for the perfect nominee. "I hope these results will do away with this foolishness about a brokered convention," said former party chairman Robert S. Strauss.
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