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SPORTS
August 25, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
With Danny Almonte - perhaps the hottest name in baseball - on the mound, the Rolando Paulino team from the Bronx, N.Y., has captured the imagination of the Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pa. But rumors continue to swirl about Almonte and his teammates, accusing them of being too old to play Little League and of living outside their team's district. "What can I do?" exasperated manager Alberto Gonzalez asked yesterday, a day before his team faces Apopka, Fla., for the U.S. championship.
SPORTS
January 24, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and the New York Yankees yesterday denied a report that team owner George Steinbrenner has told the mayor the club will leave the Bronx. "I wasn't formally notified, I wasn't informally notified," Giuliani said last night. "It wasn't hinted or suggested. " The New York Observer, a weekly newspaper that concentrates on local real estate and the arts, yesterday released a copy of a story it will publish tomorrow. The paper said Steinbrenner faxed a letter to City Hall on Jan. 12 formally notifying Giuliani the Yankees "will definitely abandon the Bronx for a new home, possibly in New Jersey.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | By Jimmy Breslin
A strip of old flypaper, pale yellow and thickly crusted with dead flies, hung from the ceiling of the cramped room. The people in the room in the Bronx saw flypaper. "Flies are not all that we have here," Elsie Ortiz said. "Rata," a boy with huge eyes said. Rats. This caused the others in the room, and there were many of them, to laugh. This was in an apartment in the Bronx the other day, which looked out onto vacant buildings and an empty lot. The kid with big eyes sat on a box. He had on a gray shirt and pants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The algebra teacher who has failed one too many students walks along a street in the Bronx. Suddenly, an arrow thuds into his back and he falls lifeless to the ground. Contemplating this homicide, a world-weary cop notes that there used to be Indians in the Bronx. His partner wants to know what happened to them. "The neighborhood changed," he replies. Add to this the case of the dead penguin, and a Saint Bernard who's a better detective than the real cops, then blend in what can only be called an affectionate melodrama and you have Five Corners.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012 | By Sarah Dilorenzo, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Arthur Avenue in the Bronx is the kind of place where you might be bribed with a cannoli. Many years ago, my father, a teacher, was begged by a student not to tell his parents he'd been caught fighting. "I'll bring you a box of cannolis every Friday," promised the student, who worked at a pastry shop in this old-school Italian American enclave. My dad did not accept the cannolis. But as a kid growing up in nearby suburbs, I often had treats from Arthur Avenue that he brought home.
SPORTS
April 17, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Yankees are close to reaching an agreement with city and state governments to build a new stadium, the New York Daily News reported yesterday. Citing unnamed sources, the newspaper reported that lawyers from the city, state and team are completing a "memorandum of understanding" and that an announcement is expected around May 1. "We're working very closely with the city and the state and trying to finalize our current plan," Yankees president Randy Levine told the Daily News.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
I Like It Like That brought Darnell Martin back to the downtrodden Bronx streets where she used to live to shoot her first feature. Martin's skills as a filmmaker are obvious, if a little raw around the edges, but her gift for dialogue is already finely tuned. She writes lines that pulse and, above all, she knows when to pull back and recognize that words are sometimes superfluous: Lisette Linares, young Latino mother, eking out an existence that has gone from hand-to-mouth to outright desperate when her husband is imprisoned, confronts her son. He is just 8 years old but already feeling the powerful lure of gangs and peer pressure.
SPORTS
October 14, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the beginning, this was where the big baseball highway always seemed to be pointing the New York Yankees: Toward an off-ramp into October paradise. Toward another World Series at Yankee Stadium. And last night, they reached their inevitable destination with a 9-5 victory over the Cleveland Indians on a quirky, drizzly, electrified evening in the Bronx. That finished off the Indians in six games in the American League Championship Series. And it will bring the World Series to baseball's ultimate cathedral for the 35th time.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
A couple weeks ago, two men from Stratford reported a dog that had been hanging out on their front lawn to the folks at the Voorhees Animal Orphanage. So, of course, the staff took her in. She seemed like a nice dog. White, short hair. Lineage uncertain. Boxer? Pit bull? Some scratches, but not too bad. But nervous, very nervous. The staff members decided to let her calm down a little before checking her for a microchip. The next day, they did. It turned out someone was looking for her. The microchip company had a number in New York City.
SPORTS
May 20, 2013
Against the Blue Jays this season, the only thing that has stopped the Yankees was a day full of rain. And that's what happened Sunday in the Bronx. "It's going to rain until probably 9 o'clock," Yankees manager Joe Girardi observed, perhaps wistfully. The Yankees would have been trying to make it seven in a row against the Blue Jays, but rain began to fall in the late morning with no signs of letting up, and the game was postponed before it started. Since last season, New York has won its last nine home games against Toronto, as well as the last six overall vs. its AL East rival.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Café Society Woody Allen's latest, set in the glammy 1930s, follows a kid from the Bronx (Jesse Eisenberg) who lands a job in Hollywood working for his uncle (Steve Carell), a big-deal agent to the stars. The agent's assistant (Kristen Stewart) is recruited to show the nephew the ropes. Romantic entanglements ensue. PG-13 Captain Fantastic No, not a new Marvel Comics franchise - the opposite, in fact: a human-scale indie about a dad (Viggo Mortensen) who has raised his six kids way off the grid in the Pacific Northwest.
SPORTS
June 29, 2016 | By Adam Hermann, STAFF WRITER
In the spring of 2002, Rahim Thompson got away from the big city, and took a cruise. Before leaving, Thompson had been planning on starting an outdoor basketball league for high school kids. He was going to call it the Chosen League. He placed phone calls during his vacation to solidify a playing location. When he returned from the cruise, he found chaos. His apartment had been robbed, and his grandmother had passed away. "It was double-trouble," Thompson said. When Thompson attended the funeral, a number of family members came up to him. They reminded him how much his grandmother had hoped he would get involved in a leadership role in his community.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
A couple weeks ago, two men from Stratford reported a dog that had been hanging out on their front lawn to the folks at the Voorhees Animal Orphanage. So, of course, the staff took her in. She seemed like a nice dog. White, short hair. Lineage uncertain. Boxer? Pit bull? Some scratches, but not too bad. But nervous, very nervous. The staff members decided to let her calm down a little before checking her for a microchip. The next day, they did. It turned out someone was looking for her. The microchip company had a number in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Local audiences will be fortunate to be offered two plays by John Patrick Shanley this winter: Outside Mullingar , a delectable Irish romance now in previews at Philadelphia Theatre Company, and Doubt: A Parable , a profound and troubling drama opening in January at Lantern Theatre. Together they represent the best, and the polar extremes, of a long and varied body of work, starting back in the day - 1987 - when we all fell in love with Shanley's Oscar-winning screenplay for the movie Moonstruck . Doubt , which won the Pulitzer Prize and the best-play Tony Award in 2005, is a troubling, fascinating work about moral ambiguity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do reality shows by their nature cheapen and dumb down the lives they depict? Probably. But Lifetime's surprising docu-series The Sisterhood: Becoming Nuns , may very well be an exception. Created by the folks behind Breaking Amish , it's about five women in their 20s who are considering taking the veil. Despite cleaving to most of the reality TV conventions, it manages to be serious and respectful - up to a point. The six-episode first season premieres at 10 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
IT SHOULD not pass without acclaim that Monday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the great achievements in the history of beer. On St. Patrick's Day 1914, a New York City coroner named Dr. Thomas Hayes Curtin stood before his associates and others at a Bronx social club and unveiled his wondrous invention: Green beer. Never before had anyone laid eyes on such a spectacle. Beer, the color of shamrocks, filling the mugs of hundreds. "Everything possible was green or decorated with that color," an eyewitness reported.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
Ross Wilson of Council Rock North represented Southeastern Pennsylvania well at the Foot Locker national cross-country meet Saturday in San Diego. Wilson, a senior at North, took 26th place, completing the three-mile course in 15 minutes, 50 seconds. Grant Fisher, a junior from Grand Blanc high school in Michigan, won the boys' race in 15:06.5. Abington Heights (Pa.) senior Tessa Barrett captured the girls' meet in 17:15.4. No runners from Southeastern Pennsylvania participated in the girls' race.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vvella@philly.com, 215-854-2513
IN THE wake of Sunday's deadly Bronx train derailment, commuters might be wondering: Could it happen here? Well, in Philadelphia, it's "not a likely scenario," according to Jeff Knueppel, SEPTA's deputy general manager. "We've had a good track record with the problem of overspeeding, and in a short amount of time, we're looking to eliminate it completely from our system," said Knueppel. In 26 years on the job, he said, he has not encountered a derailment on par with the one that killed four people.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
Haddonfield's Briana Gess finished in fifth place on Saturday at the Foot Locker girls' cross-country Northeast regional. The freshman finished the 3.1-mile course at Van Cortland Park in the Bronx, N.Y., in 17 minutes, 43.2 seconds. Ocean City's Epiphany Grisbaum came in at 19:22.4 for 38th place. Tessa Barrett of Abington Heights (Pa.) won the race in 17:32.3. In the boys' race: Hammonton's Louis Corgliano finished in ninth place with a 15:40.7 finish.
NEWS
October 24, 2013
A story in Wednesday's Inquirer misstated the New York borough where Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor was raised. She grew up in the Bronx. The story also imprecisely reported her comments about the justices' professional backgrounds. She said none of the justices had experience in criminal defense.
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