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Bronx Cheer

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NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - It takes years for the best of baseball players to get to Yankee Stadium. For Alex Jemann, it's a five-minute walk. Jemann is a 15-year-old from the Bronx. He's a freshman in high school. Jemann walked into the athletic complex at Macombs Dams Park late yesterday afternoon. He was carrying a gym bag, a baseball bat, and a dream. He wants to play big-league baseball someday. Preferably for the New York Mets, his favorite team. Or maybe the Phillies, his favorite team last night.
NEWS
May 16, 1993
Maidenform pioneered the artform, showing women - albeit fantasy women - dreaming about fighting fires, performing operations and strutting the courtrooms in their bras. Jockey took it the next step, posing arguably real women in their underwear - a mother, a data processing exec, a construction worker. So should we be surprised to pick up Time magazine and find (fully clothed) Navy Adm. Marsha Evans staring steadily from a full-page ad for "No- nonsense pantyhose"? Well, call us old-fashioned, but it doesn't sit right.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
If there were any doubt about what a first-class operation the Phillies have become, the signing of Cliff Lee ends the argument. As everyone now knows, Lee passed up about $30 million when he decided to join the Phillies instead of the New York Yankees. Free-agent athletes don't often shortchange their bank accounts deliberately. But Lee, who pitched the Phils into the World Series in 2009, actually liked playing in Philly. After he pitched for the Texas Rangers this year, he and his family wanted to come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1989 | People magazine, New York Daily News and Associated Press contributed to this report
OPERA CRITIQUE - ITALIAN STYLE At La Scala, the fans don't mince words. When they love the arias, the artist is heaped with "bravas" and bouquets. When they think it's the pits, they cut loose with catcalls and the Italian equivalent of the Bronx cheer - until someone in the wings mercifully puts out the hook. On Sunday night, the fans fell in love with American soprano Kallen Esperian, a pupil of Luciano Pavarotti and the 1985 winner of the Philadelphia opera contest. Esperian, 28, of Chicago, succeeded where Italy's Katia Ricciarelli had failed, winning over the demanding public at the famed Milan opera house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Michael Phillips, THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
The tavern in which most of The Good Heart unfolds is a Bronx cheer in the face of the Boston TV show Cheers. Here, even if the proprietor knows your name, he doesn't care about your well-being. He's in the business of "destroying" his customers drink by drink, as he reminds his protege, a formerly homeless man he has taken in to help out and keep him company. Yet underneath all the booze and blather, Jacques the barkeep, played by Brian Cox, has a good heart. Perhaps not as good as that of young Lucas, played by Paul Dano.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Stuart Denning, 29, is the self-proclaimed king of radio call-in contest winners. Practically every radio station in New York City has at one time or another been touched by Denning's phone, and relieved of its prize thanks to his tenacity on touch dialing, and a strange talent for getting his call in at the right time. "Keeping the faith and hanging in there. That's the secret," said Denning. Other aids include a phone that automatically redials, a knack for trivia, and a musical ear that can identify dozens of songs by hearing only one or two notes.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
There were rousing cheers at the welcome home rally held for Jim McGowan yesterday afternoon on Temple University's Berks Mall. "My doctor in Dover told me I would survive the English Channel swim, but not the welcoming home in Philadelphia," said the 54-year-old paraplegic marathon swimmer in response to a thunderous round of cheers from more than 1,000 Temple students and faculty. McGowan was treated in Dover, England, for hypothermia. But the cheers turned to jeers when Temple President Peter J. Liacouras took stage center.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
A proud NIMBY says light-rail is bad for S. Jersey As a proud NIMBY (not-in-my-back-yard) type, I've followed the light-rail plan intensely, weighed the pros and cons and done my research (Editorial, Feb. 15). It hasn't been easy because I've been put off and flat-out lied to by politicians and transit officials alike. I had myself appointed to the Citizens Transportation Advisory Committee so I could have input in the process. The fact is, it's a great system, but a very bad idea for this area.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | By Doreen Carvajal and Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writers Contributing to this report were Inquirer staff writers Daniel Rubin, Emilie Lounsberry and Michael B. Coakley and Inquirer correspondents William H. Sokolic, Tia Swanson, Joe Ferry and Suzanne Sczubelek
When the end finally came and victory tasted as strong as the whiskey sour in his cocktail glass, Clarence Barksdale allowed himself three loud roars. Barksdale, a 71-year-old Republican committeeman, shifted in his bar stool and grabbed the air overhead with both hands. His eyes flicked from the television set blaring the 52-48 confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas to Barksdale's bar mates, who bolted down their melting drinks in disgust. Since midafternoon, passion and political pronouncements had filled the darkened jazz club of L.G.'s Blue Note in West Oak Lane and Barksdale had waited patiently for this moment.
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NEWS
December 16, 2010
If there were any doubt about what a first-class operation the Phillies have become, the signing of Cliff Lee ends the argument. As everyone now knows, Lee passed up about $30 million when he decided to join the Phillies instead of the New York Yankees. Free-agent athletes don't often shortchange their bank accounts deliberately. But Lee, who pitched the Phils into the World Series in 2009, actually liked playing in Philly. After he pitched for the Texas Rangers this year, he and his family wanted to come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Michael Phillips, THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
The tavern in which most of The Good Heart unfolds is a Bronx cheer in the face of the Boston TV show Cheers. Here, even if the proprietor knows your name, he doesn't care about your well-being. He's in the business of "destroying" his customers drink by drink, as he reminds his protege, a formerly homeless man he has taken in to help out and keep him company. Yet underneath all the booze and blather, Jacques the barkeep, played by Brian Cox, has a good heart. Perhaps not as good as that of young Lucas, played by Paul Dano.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - It takes years for the best of baseball players to get to Yankee Stadium. For Alex Jemann, it's a five-minute walk. Jemann is a 15-year-old from the Bronx. He's a freshman in high school. Jemann walked into the athletic complex at Macombs Dams Park late yesterday afternoon. He was carrying a gym bag, a baseball bat, and a dream. He wants to play big-league baseball someday. Preferably for the New York Mets, his favorite team. Or maybe the Phillies, his favorite team last night.
NEWS
July 13, 2006
Score one for President Bush, but his budget team is still way behind. The president said Tuesday that the federal deficit for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 would be only $296 billion. That is good news; last year's deficit was $318 billion. And the Bush administration, never shy about managing expectations, had projected in February that this year's deficit would be a whopping $423 billion. So a less catastrophic deficit is indeed a ray of sunshine. But, in this week of the All-Star Game, Robert Bixby, executive director of the nonpartisan fiscal watchdog group Concord Coalition, put the news in perspective with a baseball analogy: Suppose your team is trailing by eight runs.
NEWS
December 22, 2001
Reactions to coverage of Kimmel opening Congratulations are in order to those responsible for the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, to the Philadelphia Orchestra, and to guest performers for the inaugural concert (Inquirer, Dec. 15). WHYY-TV (Channel 12) is also due praise for its broadcast coverage. The astute commentary, camera views coordinated with the score and overall excellence provided a delightful experience for those not in attendance. Brantly Rudisill Wynnewood The article about the Kimmel Center workers injured in a construction collapse last year should have been on the front page (Inquirer, Dec. 14)
SPORTS
October 15, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Red Sox will spend an autumn weekend in New England. But unless fate takes a wrong turn, there will be nothing colorful about the spectacle. Like a northern forest in November, much of the life and color have been drained from them after consecutive one-run losses to the New York Yankees in the American League Championship Series. Once again in last night's 3-2 loss before 57,180 wildly delighted fans at Yankee Stadium, the Red Sox, as they have done over and over in other Octobers, lost when they could have won, should have won. By failing to score in a bases-loaded, one-out situation in a move-filled eighth and again with two men on in the ninth, the Red Sox wasted a fine performance from starter Ramon Martinez and a clutch two-run homer by Nomar Garciaparra.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
In Spanish, in English, with thick accents and without, Latinos say: El Bronx is Yankee country. This is their team. Better not take it away. But this World Series could be the last one to excite this largely Latino borough. George Steinbrenner, the controversial Yankee owner, has been talking about moving the team for at least a decade. Lately those talks have gotten more threatening. He's talked about a new stadium in Manhattan - even a move to New Jersey. "If the Yankees leave that's it, no more baseball for me," said Mario Gamaz, a teacher who fell in love with the Yankees when he came to the Bronx from Nicaragua in 1981.
SPORTS
September 3, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Rich Kotite was no favorite of local fans or media during his tenure as the Eagles' coach, but Philadelphia is going to seem like Mayberry to Kotite if his Jets don't do something to silence the ever-vigilant New York critics. "Shame Old Jets" was the back-page headline in yesterday's New York Daily News following their lackluster 31-6 thumping by the Denver Broncos Sunday. "$80M Busts" proclaimed the New York Post, referring to the Jets' free-agent and draft acquisitions.
SPORTS
November 14, 1995 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every time they turned a corner Sunday during the New York City Marathon, Bob Schwelm and Fred Klevan were greeted by the cheers of New York's finest. And why not? The two were decked out in yellow singlets with large NYPD emblems right in the center. "The cops were going nuts, cheering us the whole way," said Schwelm, from Bryn Mawr. "Everyone was cheering us on, except for this one guy in the Bronx. " He let them have it with a Bronx cheer. Schwelm (2 hours, 22 minutes, 35 seconds)
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