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SPORTS
August 27, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Grabbed, elbowed, clawed at and dunked, U.S. water polo team defender Robin Beauregard expected the Olympic bronze medal match yesterday against Australia to be the roughest of the tournament. Sure, feelings lingered from the 2000 Sydney Games' gold-medal match, when the Australians swam away with what Americans thought should have been their gold. But the more pressing matter yesterday at OAKA Aquatic Centre was that one country would take the bronze and the other would have four years to think about how close it came to winning a medal.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diane de Nancrede Marra, 68, of Chadds Ford, a former actress, a breeder of Olympic champion horses, and an unassuming philanthropist, died Friday of respiratory failure at her Chadds Ford home in Chester County. The oldest daughter of Canadian newspaper magnate George Maxwell Bell, she grew up in Calgary and often rode in the famous Calgary Stampede, competing in barrel racing events. She also studied theater at Mills College in California, and at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London.
SPORTS
October 1, 2001 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A year off did nothing to hurt Flim Flam's chances in Dressage at Devon yesterday. Susan Blinks and Flim Flam, her 14-year-old gelding who rode to a bronze medal in the Summer Olympics last year in Sydney, Australia, took first place in the Grand Prix Special. Blinks, of Mount Kisco, N.Y., took the $3,000 top prize during a brisk and breezy morning on the final day of competition at the 27th annual event. Blinks performed nearly to perfection, earning a high mark of 70.651.
SPORTS
August 28, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Kim Johnsson, a defenseman acquired from the New York Rangers in the Eric Lindros trade, signed a three-year contract with the Flyers, the club announced yesterday. The Flyers obtained Johnsson, 25, right winger Pavel Brendl, free-agent left winger Jan Hlavac and a third-round draft pick in 2003 in the deal for Lindros. Johnsson, who is 6-foot-1 and 205 pounds, had five goals, 21 assists and 40 penalty minutes in 75 games for the Rangers last season, his second in the NHL. A native of Malmo, Sweden, Johnsson starred at the 2001 world championships for Sweden, which won the bronze medal.
SPORTS
October 24, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Former Penn wrestler Brandon Slay said his Olympic wrestling gold medal is even sweeter because he knew "the agony of defeat before the thrill of victory. " The International Olympic Committee yesterday disqualified Germany's Alexander Leipold, who had beaten Slay, a graduate of Penn's Wharton School, in the 1671/2-pound freestyle final, 4-0, in Sydney, Australia, for using a banned steroid. Leipold was the third gold medalist and fifth athlete from the Games to be disqualified because of the use of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
October 1, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Armstrong had come here to win gold. He had broken his neck in training, gotten hit by a car, and kept working to win one medal. "I went as fast as I could go," said the man who has a pretty fair knowledge of how far he can push himself. Yesterday, over a 49-mile course, Armstrong was 34 seconds short. Good enough for a bronze medal in the Olympic cycling time trial, his first Olympic medal in his third trip to the Games. But not the reason he had kept going after winning his second Tour de France in July.
SPORTS
September 30, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The whistle blew and Chris Albright, his Olympics over, didn't move even an inch. The U.S. players, who had fallen just short of a bronze medal in soccer, were exchanging jerseys with the victorious Chilean players. Albright, a long way from FC Bayern, the Northeast Philly club where he grew up playing this sport, still stood there, for a minute, two minutes, his hands on his hips, staring into space. The Penn Charter graduate reached down, pulled down his socks, and tossed his shin guards to the turf.
SPORTS
September 29, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chris Huffins had to do what he had never done before. When he crossed the finish line after 1,500 meters, a race he used to hate, he knew that he had done it. "You know when you're a kid playing basketball by yourself?" Huffins said after winning the bronze medal in the Olympic decathlon last night. "And you imagine it's the championship game, and time is running out? And you put up a shot and it goes in and you won the championship? It was a moment just like that. " Huffins went into the second day of the decathlon with the lead.
SPORTS
September 28, 2000 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seconds after he was born, Ricardo Juarez's father named him "Rocky. " With his performance yesterday, the world may have discovered how fitting the name is. With his father, Carlos, and family in the stands, and a world champion cheering him on at ringside, Juarez - named after Rocky Marciano - bombarded his opponent with a flurry of body and head shots before a frenzied crowd inside the Sydney Exhibition Centre. The 125-pound bout was stopped with eight seconds left in the fourth and final round because of the 15-point mercy rule, with Juarez ahead, 31-16.
SPORTS
September 27, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There would be no Miracle on Grass. It didn't take the U.S. men's soccer players long to figure that out. "I came out for warm-ups. I was like, 'Wow, I don't have the normal spring,' " said U.S. defender Danny Califf. "My legs were heavy. " Within 25 minutes last night, the U.S. team had given up two goals to Spain. That was it. The Americans' semifinal bid was over. The 3-1 loss at the Sydney Football Stadium means that the United States, which had been the surprise team of this tournament, will play Chile for a bronze medal Friday.
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